Rabat-Salé-Kénitra

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Rabat-Salé-Kénitra

  • الرباط-سلا-القنيطرة  (Arabic)
  • ⴻⵕⵕⴱⴰⵟ-ⵙⵍⴰ-ⵇⵏⵉⵟⵔⴰ  (Berber languages)
Rabat Sale Kenitra region locator map.svg
Location in Morocco
Coordinates: 34°02′N6°50′W / 34.033°N 6.833°W / 34.033; -6.833 Coordinates: 34°02′N6°50′W / 34.033°N 6.833°W / 34.033; -6.833
CountryFlag of Morocco.svg  Morocco
Capital Rabat
Government
  WaliAbdelouafi Laftit
  PresidentAbdessamad Sekkal
Population
 (2014 census)
  Total4,580,866
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)

Rabat-Salé-Kenitra (Arabic : الرباط-سلا-القنيطرة, romanized: ar-ribāṭ salā al-qunayṭira; Berber languages : ⴻⵕⵕⴱⴰⵟ-ⵙⵍⴰ-ⵇⵏⵉⵟⵔⴰ, romanized: eṛṛbaṭ sla qniṭra) is one of the twelve administrative regions of Morocco. It is situated in north-western Morocco and has a population of 4,580,866 (2014 census). [1] The capital is Rabat. [2]

Contents

History

Rabat-Salé-Kenitra was formed in September 2015 by merging Rabat-Salé-Zemmour-Zaer with the region of Gharb-Chrarda-Béni Hssen. [2]

Administrative divisions

The region is made up into the following provinces and prefectures: [3]

Related Research Articles

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Sidi Slimane, Morocco city in Rabat-Salé-Kénitra, Morocco

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Drâa-Tafilalet Region of Morocco

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Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima Region of Morocco

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Béni Mellal-Khénifra Region of Morocco

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References

  1. "Population légale d'après les résultats du RGPH 2014 sur le Bulletin officiel N° 6354" (pdf). Haut-Commissariat au Plan (in Arabic). Retrieved 11 July 2015.
  2. 1 2 "Décret fixant le nom des régions" (PDF). Portail National des Collectivités Territoriales (in French). 20 February 2015. Archived from the original (pdf) on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 11 December 2015.
  3. "Décret fixant le nom des régions" (PDF). Portail National des Collectivités Territoriales (in French). Archived from the original (pdf) on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 11 July 2015.