Radio Bulgaria

Last updated
Radio Bulgaria (BNR)
Bnr-radio-bulgaria.png
Type Radio network
Country
Bulgaria
Ownership
Owner Government of Bulgaria
Key people
Angel Nedyalkov (Director)
History
Launch dateMarch 30, 1930
Coverage
AvailabilityInternational
Links
Website http://www.bnr.bg/en

Radio Bulgaria (Bulgarian: Радио България, Radio Balgariya; BNR) is the official international broadcasting station of Bulgaria.

Contents

History

For almost seventy years the world service of the Bulgarian radio, formerly called Radio Sofia but now renamed Radio Bulgaria, has been presenting the country’s cultural and national identity to the world. It is a principal source of information from and about Bulgaria for millions of listeners outside its borders.[ citation needed ]

Current broadcasting

Radio Bulgaria ended its shortwave service on February 1, 2012. [1]

See also

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References

  1. "As of February 1 Radio Bulgaria suspends shortwave broadcasts". Radio Bulgaria. Bulgarian National Radio. January 16, 2012. Archived from the original on August 30, 2012. Retrieved July 5, 2013.