Radziejów County

Last updated
Radziejów County

Powiat radziejowski
Krzywosadz manor house.jpg
POL powiat radziejowski flag.svg
Flag
POL powiat radziejowski COA.svg
Coat of arms
Powiat radziejowski.png
Location within the voivodeship
Coordinates(Radziejów): 52°38′N18°31′E / 52.633°N 18.517°E / 52.633; 18.517 Coordinates: 52°38′N18°31′E / 52.633°N 18.517°E / 52.633; 18.517
CountryFlag of Poland.svg  Poland
Voivodeship Kuyavian-Pomeranian
Seat Radziejów
Gminas
Area
  Total607 km2 (234 sq mi)
Population
 (2019)
  Total40,546
  Density67/km2 (170/sq mi)
   Urban
10,034
  Rural
30,512
Car plates CRA
Website http://www.radziejow.pl

Radziejów County (Polish : powiat radziejowski) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, north-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Radziejów, which lies 45 km (28 mi) south of Toruń and 64 km (40 mi) south-east of Bydgoszcz. The only other town in the county is Piotrków Kujawski, lying 10 km (6 mi) south of Radziejów.

Contents

The county covers an area of 607 square kilometres (234.4 sq mi). As of 2019 its total population is 40,546, out of which the population of Radziejów is 5,578, that of Piotrków Kujawski is 4,456, and the rural population is 30,512.

Neighbouring counties

Radziejów County is bordered by Aleksandrów County to the north, Włocławek County to the east, Koło County and Konin County to the south, and Inowrocław County to the north-west.

Administrative division

The county is subdivided into seven gminas (one urban, one urban-rural and five rural). These are listed in the following table, in descending order of population.

GminaTypeArea
(km²)
Population
(2019)
Seat
Gmina Piotrków Kujawski urban-rural138.69,311 Piotrków Kujawski
Gmina Osięciny rural123.07,619 Osięciny
Radziejów urban5.75,578 
Gmina Dobre rural70.85,372 Dobre
Gmina Topólka rural102.94,827 Topólka
Gmina Radziejów rural92.64,366 Radziejów *
Gmina Bytoń rural73.43,473 Bytoń
* seat not part of the gmina

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References