Rail transport in Honduras

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Passenger train in La Ceiba on January 11, 2005. Engineer tanks fuel manually from a barrel. Colorful passenger car (former box car without walls) is attached to the right. Train LaCeiba2.JPG
Passenger train in La Ceiba on January 11, 2005. Engineer tanks fuel manually from a barrel. Colorful passenger car (former box car without walls) is attached to the right.
Rail map as of 1925 Honduras rail map 1925.jpg
Rail map as of 1925

Railroads in Honduras were built in late 19th and early 20th centuries by two competing U.S. corporations - United Fruit (Tela Railroad Company) and Standard Fruit (later nationalized). All were in the Caribbean coastal area and never reached the capital. In 1993, the combined network had 785 km. At present (2006), only three separate segments remain in operation under the management of FNH - Ferrocarril Nacional de Honduras:

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San Pedro Sula Place in Cortés, Honduras

San Pedro Sula is the capital of Cortés Department, Honduras. It is located in the northwest corner of the country in the Sula Valley, about 50 kilometres (31 mi) south of Puerto Cortés on the Caribbean Sea. With a census population of 719,063 in 2013, and 1,445,598 people living in its metropolitan area in 2010, it is the nation's primary industrial center and second largest city after the capital Tegucigalpa.

La Ceiba Place in Atlántida, Honduras

La Ceiba is a port city on the northern coast of Honduras in Central America. It is located on the southern edge of the Caribbean, forming part of the south eastern boundary of the Gulf of Honduras. With an estimated population of over 200,000 living in approximately 170 residential areas, it is the third largest city in the country and the capital of the Honduran department of Atlántida. La Ceiba was officially founded on 23 August 1877. The city was named after a giant ceiba tree which grew near the old dock. The dock itself finally fell into the sea in late 2007. The city has been officially proclaimed the "Eco-Tourism Capital of Honduras" as well as the "Entertainment Capital of Honduras". Every year, on the third or fourth Saturday of May, the city holds its famous carnival to commemorate Isidore the Laborer. During this time, the city is host to approximately 500,000 tourists.

History

The railroads in Honduras were originally built by banana companies and consisted of two separate systems with differing gauges. The larger system, with almost 600 kilometers (370 mi) of track, was built by Standard Fruit Company in the early 1900s. Half of this system was 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) narrow gauge; the other half consisted of 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge lines. The government nationalized the Standard Fruit line in 1983, renaming it the Honduras National Railroad (Ferrocarril Nacional de Honduras—FNH). The other system, owned by the Tela Railroad Company, a subsidiary of Chiquita Brands International, encompassed 190 kilometers (120 mi) of 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) narrow gauge lines. Both systems were located in the north central and northwestern coastal areas of Honduras and provided freight and passenger service. [2]

Track gauge spacing of the rails on a railway track

In rail transport, track gauge or track gage is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails.

3 ft 6 in gauge railways railways with tracks 1067 mm (3′ 6″) apart

Railways with a track gauge of 3 ft 6 in / 1,067 mm were first constructed as horse-drawn wagonways. From the mid-nineteenth century, the 3 ft 6 in gauge became widespread in the British Empire, and was adopted as a standard in Japan and Taiwan.

3 ft gauge railways

Three foot gauge railways have a track gauge of 3 ft or 1 yard. This gauge is a narrow gauge and is generally found throughout North, Central, and South America. In Ireland, many secondary and industrial lines were built to 3 ft gauge, and it is the dominant gauge on the Isle of Man, where it is known as the Manx Standard Gauge. Modern 3 ft gauge railways are most commonly found in isolated mountainous areas, on small islands, or in large-scale amusement parks and theme parks. This gauge is also popular in model railroading, and model prototypes of these railways have been made by several model train brands around the world, such as Accucraft Trains (US), Aristo-Craft Trains (US), Bachmann Industries, Delton Locomotive Works (US), LGB (Germany), and PIKO (Germany).

FERISTSA

The FERISTSA Railway was proposed to connect Mexico with Panama and therefore pass through Honduras. [3]

FERISTSA

FERISTSA was the name of a proposed 1,600-mile (2,600 km) US$3 billion privately owned commercial railroad going from the Panama Canal Railway Company through the entire length of Central America, linking with Mexico's rail system at the Guatemala border, and thus to Belize, the United States, and Canada.

Transoceanic project

In 2013 it was announced that the Honduran Government and the China Harbour Engineering Company (CCEC) were interested in building a transoceanic railroad. [4]

China Harbour Engineering Company Ltd (CHEC) is an engineering contractor and a subsidiary of China Communications Construction Company (CCCC), providing infrastructure construction, such as marine engineering, dredging and reclamation, road and bridge, railways, airports and plant construction. It is the second largest dredging company in the world, carrying out projects in Asia, Africa, and Europe.

See also

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The 1991–92 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 26th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament remained the same as the previous season. C.D. Motagua won the title after defeating Real C.D. España in the finals. Both teams qualified to the 1992 CONCACAF Champions' Cup.

Rail transport in Guatemala

Although Guatemala still has a network of 3 ft narrow gauge railroads, no passenger or freight trains currently run, except for occasional chartered tourist trains.

Rail transport in El Salvador

At present (2015), no trains are operated in El Salvador. The national railroad corporation is FENADESAL, a division of CEPA. It oversees 554.8 km of all disused 3 ft narrow gauge lines connecting major cities and formerly linked with Guatemala railroads at Anguiatú.

Since 2008, the only functioning railroad in Panama has been the Panama Canal Railway, operated by the Panama Canal Railway Company, successor of Panama Railway, which provides passenger and freight service between Panama City and Colón. Historically, there were also narrow gauge railroads in Chiriquí Province, which were been abandoned in the late 20th century.

History of rail transport in Nicaragua

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Rail transport in Central America

Rail transport in Central America consists of several isolated railroad lines with freight or passenger service. The most famous one is the Panama Canal Railway, the oldest transcontinental railroad in the world, connecting Panama City with Colón since 1855. Other railroads in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama were built by private and public investors mainly to facilitate the transport of local agricultural produce to export markets and harbors. Their market share and profitability went into decline in the second half of the twentieth century and most lines have been decommissioned by the end of the 1990s. As of 2018, railroads operate locally in Honduras, Costa Rica and Panama only; all rail transport has been suspended in Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua. None of the operating railways crosses national borders.

The 1990–91 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 25th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament consisted of a three round-robin schedule followed by a 5-team playoff round. Real C.D. España won the title after defeating C.D. Motagua in the finals. Both teams qualified to the 1991 CONCACAF Champions' Cup.

The 1986–87 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 21st edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament remained the same as the previous season. Club Deportivo Olimpia won the title after winning the final round and qualified to the 1987 CONCACAF Champions' Cup along with runners-up Real C.D. España.

The 1992–93 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 27th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament remained the same as the previous season. Club Deportivo Olimpia won the title after winning the regular season and the final round and qualified to the 1994 CONCACAF Champions' Cup along with runners-up C.D. Petrotela.

The 1985–86 Honduran Liga Nacional season was the 20th edition of the Honduran Liga Nacional. The format of the tournament consisted of two groups of five followed by a 4-team playoff round. C.D. Marathón won the title after winning the final round and qualified to the 1986 CONCACAF Champions' Cup along with C.D. Motagua.

Banana production in Honduras

Banana production in Honduras plays an important role in the economy of Honduras. In 1992, the revenue generated from banana sales amounted to US$287 million and along with the coffee industry accounted for some 50% of exports. Honduras produced 861,000 tons of bananas in 1999. The two corporations, Chiquita Brands International and the Dole Food Company are responsible for most Honduran banana production and exports.

References