Rajanganaya Dam

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Rajanganaya Dam
Rajanganaya Dam - Sri Lanka - 30DEC2012.JPG
Country Sri Lanka
Location Rajanganaya
Coordinates 08°08′30″N80°13′23″E / 8.14167°N 80.22306°E / 8.14167; 80.22306 Coordinates: 08°08′30″N80°13′23″E / 8.14167°N 80.22306°E / 8.14167; 80.22306
Purpose Irrigation
Status Operational
Operator(s) Ministry of Irrigation
Dam and spillways
Impounds Kala Oya
Length 350 m (1,150 ft)
Reservoir
Total capacity 100.37×10^6 m3 (3,545×10^6 cu ft)
Catchment area 76,863.60 hectares (189,934.1 acres)

The Rajanganaya Dam (also sometimes called Rajangana) is an irrigation dam built across the Kala Oya river, at Rajanganaya, bordering the North Western and North Central provinces of Sri Lanka. The main concrete dam measures approximately 350 m (1,150 ft) and creates the Rajanganaya Reservoir, which has a catchment area of 76,863.60 hectares (189,934.1 acres) and a total storage capacity of 100.37 million cubic metres (3,545×10^6 cu ft). [1]

Dam A barrier that stops or restricts the flow of surface or underground streams

A dam is a barrier that stops or restricts the flow of water or underground streams. Reservoirs created by dams not only suppress floods but also provide water for activities such as irrigation, human consumption, industrial use, aquaculture, and navigability. Hydropower is often used in conjunction with dams to generate electricity. A dam can also be used to collect water or for storage of water which can be evenly distributed between locations. Dams generally serve the primary purpose of retaining water, while other structures such as floodgates or levees are used to manage or prevent water flow into specific land regions. The earliest known dam is the Jawa Dam in Jordan, dating to 3,000 BC.

Kala Oya

The Kala Oya is the third longest river in Sri Lanka. It is approximately 145 km (90 mi) in length. The river has a basin size of 2,873 km2 (1,109 sq mi), and more than 400,000 rural population live by the river basin.

Rajanganaya Divisional Secretariat is a Divisional Secretariat of Anuradhapura District, of North Central Province, Sri Lanka.

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