Ralph E. Haines Jr.

Last updated
Ralph E. Haines Jr.
Ralph Edward Haines Jr USARPAC.jpg
Haines as Commander, U.S. Army, Pacific
Born(1913-08-21)August 21, 1913
Fort Mott, New Jersey [1]
DiedNovember 23, 2011(2011-11-23) (aged 98)
San Antonio, Texas
Place of burial
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Department of the Army Seal.svg United States Army
Years of service1935–1973
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg General
Commands heldContinental Army Command
U.S. Army, Pacific
III Corps
1st Armored Division
Battles/wars World War II
Awards Distinguished Service Medal
Legion of Merit (3)
Bronze Star
Haines in February 2010. Ralph Haines 2010.jpg
Haines in February 2010.

Ralph Edward Haines Jr. (August 21, 1913 – November 23, 2011) was a United States Army four-star general who served as Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army from 1967 to 1968, Commander, U.S. Army, Pacific from August 1968 to October 1970, and Commanding General, U.S. Continental Army Command (CG CONARC), from 1970 to 1973. At his death he was the Army's oldest living four-star general and its senior retired officer. [2]

Contents

Military career

Haines attended Texas Military Institute and graduated in 1930 as his class valedictorian. [3] He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1935 with a commission in the Cavalry. He later attended the Armed Forces Staff College, the Army War College, the National War College and the Army Management School. Prior to World War II he served in the Philippine Scouts and during the war he served in Italy.

Haines served as Commanding General of the 1st Armored Division at Fort Hood, Texas, from 1962 to 1963. He served as Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff for Force Development in Washington from 1963 to 1965. From 1965 to 1967, he commanded the III Corps. He was successively Acting Vice Chief of Staff and then Vice Chief of Staff for the U.S. Army and during this period he commanded the army forces assisting the suppression of the 1968 Washington, D.C. riots. [4] :282-5 He then served as Commanding General, Continental Army Command, at Fort Monroe, Virginia until his retirement on January 31, 1973.

Haines's awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, and the Bronze Star. [5]

Post military career

The Ralph E. Haines Jr. Award, presented to the United States Army Reserve Drill Sergeant of the Year, is named in his honor. [6] Haines was member of the Advisory Committee of the U.S. Cavalry Association. [7] He retired to San Antonio, Texas, with his wife, the former Sally Swift, who died in 2003. [8] Haines had two sons, both West Point alumni. [3] One son, Palmer Swift Haines, died in an aircraft crash in 2004 when the Cessna 421 he was piloting suffered dual engine failure near Austin, Texas. [9]

Haines died in November 2011 at the San Antonio Military Medical Center of natural causes. [10]

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References

  1. Department of Defense appropriations
  2. Ramon, Robert R. (February 17, 2010), "Army's oldest living four-star general visits Army South Headquarters", U.S. Army South Public Affairs
  3. 1 2 Texas Military Institute bio Archived 2007-09-28 at the Wayback Machine
  4. Scheips, Paul (2005). The Role of Federal Military Forces in Domestic Disorders, 1945-1992 (PDF). US Army Center of Military History. ISBN   9781517253783.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  5. Huddleston, Scott, "San Antonian Celebrating Long Gray Line", San Antonio Express-News , May 16, 2010.
  6. Ralph E. Haines Jr. Award
  7. U.S. Cavalry Association Officers Archived 2007-09-29 at the Wayback Machine
  8. Obituary of Ralph Haines' son, Palmer Swift Haines [ permanent dead link ]
  9. "Catkiller Newsletter August 2004". Archived from the original on February 19, 2005. Retrieved 2007-08-29.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  10. https://news.yahoo.com/oldest-living-4-star-army-general-ralph-haines-222842023.html

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Government document " United States Army, Pacific - History of General Ralph E. Haines Jr. ".

Military offices
Preceded by
Gen. Creighton Abrams
Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army
1967–1968
Succeeded by
Gen. Bruce Palmer Jr.