Ralph Grey, 4th Baron Grey of Werke

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Ralph Grey, 4th Baron Grey of Werke (c. 1661 – 1706) was an English peer who served as Governor of Barbados and as one of the English commissioners for the negotiations on the Treaty of Union between England and Scotland.

The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.

Treaty of Union

The Treaty of Union is the name usually now given to the agreement which led to the creation of the new state of Great Britain, stating that England and Scotland were to be "United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain", At the time it was more often referred to as the Articles of Union.

The second son of Ralph Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Werke, he became an officer in the Army. A Whig, he was a Member of Parliament for Berwick from 1679 to 1681 and attended King William III following the Glorious Revolution of 1688. He was again a member for Berwick from 1695 to 1698 and briefly in 1701. He was Auditor of Wales from 1692 to 1702 and also Governor of Barbados from 1698 to 1701. On 24 June 1701, on the death of his older brother Ford Grey, 1st Earl of Tankerville, he succeeded as Baron Grey of Werke, taking him from the House of Commons into the House of Lords. [1]

Whiggism is a historical political philosophy that grew out of the Parliamentarian faction in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms (1639–1651). The Whigs' key policy positions were the supremacy of Parliament, tolerance of Protestant dissenters and opposition to a "Papist" on the throne, especially James II or one of his descendants.

Berwick-upon-Tweed (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Berwick-upon-Tweed is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK parliament by an elected Member of Parliament (MP). Since 2015 this MP has been Anne-Marie Trevelyan of the Conservative Party who succeeded the longest serving Liberal Democrat MP Sir Alan Beith who stood down prior to the 2015 election.

Glorious Revolution 17th Century British revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law. William's successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascension to the throne as William III of England jointly with his wife, Mary II, James's daughter, after the Declaration of Right, leading to the Bill of Rights 1689.

Appointed as one of the thirty-one English commissioners for the negotiation of the Treaty of Union, he died on 20 June 1706, shortly before the Articles of Union were settled on 22 July, and was buried at Bocking, Essex. [1]

Bocking, Essex settlement and former civil parish in Essex, England

Bocking is an area of Braintree, Essex, England, which was a former village and civil parish. In 1934 it became part of the civil parish of Braintree and Bocking, which is now within Braintree District.

Grey's estates in Northumberland were inherited by a nephew, Henry Neville, a son of his sister Katherine Grey by her marriage to Richard Neville, and Henry Neville then changed his name to Grey by a private Act of Parliament. [2]

Northumberland County of England

Northumberland is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham and Tyne and Wear to the south and the Scottish Borders to the north. To the east is the North Sea coastline with a 64 miles (103 km) path. The county town is Alnwick, although the County council is based in Morpeth.

Henry Grey was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1709 and 1740.

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Acts of Union 1707 Acts of Parliament creating the United Kingdom of Great Britain

The Acts of Union were two Acts of Parliament: the Union with Scotland Act 1706 passed by the Parliament of England, and the Union with England Act passed in 1707 by the Parliament of Scotland. They put into effect the terms of the Treaty of Union that had been agreed on 22 July 1706, following negotiation between commissioners representing the parliaments of the two countries. By the two Acts, the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland—which at the time were separate states with separate legislatures, but with the same monarch—were, in the words of the Treaty, "United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain".

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Baron Grey of Werke

Baron Grey of Werke , of Chillingham in the County of Northumberland, was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created on 11 February 1624 for Sir William Grey, 1st Baronet. He had already been created a baronet, of Chillingham in the County of Northumberland, in the Baronetage of England on 15 June 1619. The third Baron was created Viscount Glendale and Earl of Tankerville in the Peerage of England in 1695. He left two daughters but no sons and on his death in 1701 the viscountcy and earldom became extinct. He was succeeded in the barony by his younger brother, the fourth Baron. The latter had previously represented Berwick in Parliament. The barony became extinct on his death in 1706.

Ford Grey, 1st Earl of Tankerville English nobleman and statesman

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Thomas Widdrington Chief Baron of the Exchequer

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Ralph Grey may refer to:

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Bevil Granville Governor of Barbados

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