Ralph Stratford

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Ralph Stratford
Bishop of London
Elected26 January 1340
Term ended17 April 1354
Predecessor Richard de Wentworth
Successor Michael Northburgh
Orders
Consecration12 March 1340
Personal details
Born c. 1300
Warwickshire
Died7 or 17 April 1354
Stepney, London
DenominationCatholic
Coats of arms attributed to Ralph de Stratford:

a) Per fess gules and sable, three plates
b) Gules, a fess argent, between three plates
c) Two cinquefoils pierced; quartering, 2 and 3, a sword in pale, point towards chief; 4, three cinquefoils Ralph de Stratfords Coat of Arms.jpeg
Coats of arms attributed to Ralph de Stratford:
  • a) Per fess gules and sable, three plates
  • b) Gules, a fess argent, between three plates
  • c) Two cinquefoils pierced; quartering, 2 and 3, a sword in pale, point towards chief; 4, three cinquefoils

Ralph Stratford (c. 1300-1354), also known as Ralph Hatton of Stratford, was a medieval Bishop of London.

Contents

Early life

Born in Stratford-on-Avon at the beginning of the fourteenth century, Stratford's parents may have been Thomas Hatton (of Warwickshire) and a sister of the bishops John de Stratford and Robert Stratford. He is also related, through them, to Henry de Stratford, Sir Andrew de Stratford [2] and the Archdeacon Thomas de Stratford. He attended Oxford University and was regent MA in 1329. [3]

Career

Stratford's career was closely defined by and linked with his uncles John and Robert. [4] He was elected 26 January 1340 and consecrated on 12 March 1340. [5] In 1350 the king nominated him for the cardinalate. [3]

Death

Stratford died at Stepney, on 7 or 17 April 1354, and on 28 April his uncle Robert Stratford, bishop of Chichester, granted forty days' indulgence to those who prayed for his soul. He was buried in St Paul's Cathedral. [3]

Citations

  1. Bedford, WK Riland. "The Blazon of Episcopacy" 1858
  2. Blomefield and Parkin An essay towards a topographical history of the county of Norfolk pp. 390
  3. 1 2 3 Roy Martin Haines, ‘Stratford , Ralph (c.1300–1354)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 28 May 2014
  4. Haines, Roy Martin (1986). Archbishop John Stratford, Political Revolutionary and Champion of the Liberties of the English Church, c.1275/80-1348. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies. ISBN   0888440766.
  5. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 258

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References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Richard de Wentworth
Bishop of London
1340–1354
Succeeded by
Michael Northburgh