Rancho San Pablo

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Rancho San Pablo was a 17,939-acre (72.60 km2) land grant in present-day Contra Costa County, California given in 1823 by Governor Luís Antonio Argüello to Francisco María Castro (1775–1831), a former soldier at the San Francisco Presidio and one-time alcalde of the Pueblo of San José. The grant was reconfirmed by Governor José Figueroa in 1834 to the heirs of Francisco Castro, including Víctor Castro. [1] The San Pablo grant covered what is now Richmond, San Pablo, and Kensington in western Contra Costa County. [2]

History

The land had previously been grazing land for cattle belonging to the Misión Dolores, but was secularized by the new Mexican republic. Francisco Maria Castro lived there with his wife María Gabriela Berreyesa and family from the late 1820s until his death in 1831. Governor of Mexican Alta California, Juan Alvarado, married one of the Castro daughters in 1839. After his term as governor was completed, they retired to her family property on Rancho San Pablo. [3] [4]

With the cession of California to the United States following the Mexican–American War, the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo provided that the land grants would be honored. As required by the Land Act of 1851, a claim for Rancho San Pablo was filed with the Public Land Commission by Joaquín Ysidro Castro in 1852, [5] and the grant was patented to Joaquín Ysidro Castro in 1878. [6] [7]

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References

  1. Ogden Hoffman, 1862, Reports of Land Cases Determined in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, Numa Hubert, San Francisco
  2. Diseño del Rancho Rancho San Pablo
  3. City of San Pablo - Spanish and Mexican Era (1776-1846) Archived 2007-10-09 at the Wayback Machine
  4. Conley, Frances, 1980, First Settlers: The Castros of Rancho San Pablo, San Pablo Historical and Museum Society.
  5. United States. District Court (California : Northern District) Land Case 320 ND
  6. Report of the Surveyor General 1844 - 1886 Archived 2009-05-04 at the Wayback Machine
  7. Rancho San Pablo History

Coordinates: 37°57′36″N122°19′48″W / 37.960°N 122.330°W / 37.960; -122.330