Randall Stout

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Randall Stout

Randall Stout.jpg

Randall Stout in 2011
Born(1958-05-06)May 6, 1958
Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S.
Died July 11, 2014(2014-07-11) (aged 56)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Nationality American
Occupation Architect
Practice Randall Stout Architects, Inc.
Buildings Hunter Museum of American Art, Taubman Museum of Art

Randall Paul Stout (May 6, 1958 July 11, 2014) was a Los Angeles, California based architect.

Architect person trained to plan and design buildings, and oversee their construction

An architect is a person who plans, designs and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings that have human occupancy or use as their principal purpose. Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek, i.e., chief builder.

Contents

Early life and education

Born and raised in Tennessee, [1] Stout held a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Tennessee and a Master of Architecture from Rice University. [2] [3]

Tennessee State of the United States of America

Tennessee is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Tennessee is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the west, and Missouri to the northwest. The Appalachian Mountains dominate the eastern part of the state, and the Mississippi River forms the state's western border. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, with a 2017 population of 667,560 and a 2017 metro population of 1,903,045. Tennessee's second largest city is Memphis, which had a population of 652,236 in 2017.

The Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) is a bachelor's degree designed to satisfy the academic requirement of practicing architecture.

University of Tennessee Public university in Knoxville, Tennessee, United States

The University of Tennessee is a public research university in Knoxville, Tennessee. Founded in 1794, two years before Tennessee became the 16th state, it is the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee system, with ten undergraduate colleges and eleven graduate colleges. It hosts almost 28,000 students from all 50 states and more than 100 foreign countries. In its 2019 universities ranking, U.S. News & World Report ranked UT 115th among all national universities and 52nd among public institutions of higher learning. Seven alumni have been selected as Rhodes Scholars. James M. Buchanan, M.S. '41, received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Economics. UT's ties to nearby Oak Ridge National Laboratory, established under UT President Andrew Holt and continued under the UT–Battelle partnership, allow for considerable research opportunities for faculty and students.

Career

Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, Virginia, United States (2008) Taubman Museum of Art.jpg
Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, Virginia, United States (2008)

Before starting his own firm, Stout worked four years at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, and seven and a half years for Frank O. Gehry & Associates. [4]

Frank Gehry Canadian-American architect

Frank Owen Gehry,, FAIA is a Canadian-born American architect, residing in Los Angeles.

Death

Stout died of renal cell cancer on July 11, 2014 in Los Angeles. [5] He was 56.

Renal cell carcinoma renal carcinoma that has material basis in the lining of the proximal convoluted renal tubule of the kidney

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a kidney cancer that originates in the lining of the proximal convoluted tubule, a part of the very small tubes in the kidney that transport primary urine. RCC is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, responsible for approximately 90–95% of cases.

Completed Works

Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (2010) AGA on Churchill Square.jpg
Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (2010)
Hunter Museum of American Art art museum in Chattanooga, Tennessee

The Hunter Museum of American Art is an art museum in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The museum's collections include works representing the Hudson River School, 19th century genre painting, American Impressionism, the Ashcan School, early modernism, regionalism, and post World War II modern and contemporary art.

Chattanooga, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

Chattanooga is a city located in Hamilton County, southeastern Tennessee, along the Tennessee River bordering Georgia. With an estimated population of 179,139 in 2017, it is the fourth-largest city in Tennessee and one of the two principal cities of East Tennessee, along with Knoxville. Served by multiple railroads and Interstate highways, Chattanooga is a transit hub. Chattanooga lies 118 miles (190 km) northwest of Atlanta, Georgia, 112 miles (180 km) southwest of Knoxville, Tennessee, 134 miles (216 km) southeast of Nashville, Tennessee, 102 miles (164 km) east-northeast of Huntsville, Alabama, and 147 miles (237 km) northeast of Birmingham, Alabama.

Taubman Museum of Art Art museum in Virginia, United States

The Taubman Museum of Art, formerly the Art Museum of Western Virginia, is an art museum located in Downtown Roanoke, Virginia, United States. It was designed by architect Randall Stout.

Related Research Articles

References

  1. "The Architect - Randall Stout". Art Museum of Western Virginia. Retrieved 2008-02-09.
  2. "Bio - Randall Stout". Randall Stout Architects, Inc. Archived from the original on 2008-07-08. Retrieved 2008-02-07.
  3. "Off-the-Grid Architecture" (Press release). University of Arkansas. 2007-03-29. Retrieved 2008-02-07.
  4. "Interview with Randall Stout". Volume 5. Retrieved 2008-02-09.
  5. Giovannini, Joseph (July 16, 2014). "Randall Stout, Architect Tied to Nature, Dies at 56". New York Times . Retrieved July 17, 2014.