Rawson Plateau

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Rawson Plateau
Highest point
Elevation 3,400 m (11,200 ft)
Coordinates 85°52′S164°45′W / 85.867°S 164.750°W / -85.867; -164.750 Coordinates: 85°52′S164°45′W / 85.867°S 164.750°W / -85.867; -164.750

The Rawson Plateau is an ice-covered plateau, 15 miles (24 km) long and 3,400 metres (11,150 ft) high, rising between the heads of Bowman Glacier, Moffett Glacier and Steagall Glacier in the Queen Maud Mountains. It was mapped by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (ByrdAE), 1928–30, and by the U.S. Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and named for Kennett L. Rawson, a contributor to the ByrdAE, 1928–30, and a member of the ByrdAE, 1933–35.

Bowman Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Bowman Glacier is a deeply entrenched glacier, 40 nautical miles (70 km) long, descending the polar plateau between the Quarles Range and the Rawson Plateau of the Queen Maud Mountains to enter the Ross Ice Shelf just west of the flow of Amundsen Glacier. It was discovered in December 1929 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition geological party under Laurence Gould, and named by Richard E. Byrd for Isaiah Bowman, an eminent geographer who was president of Johns Hopkins University, 1935–49, and Director of the American Geographical Society, 1915–35.

Moffett Glacier is a tributary glacier, 13 nautical miles (24 km) long, flowing east from Rawson Plateau to enter Amundsen Glacier just south of Mount Benjamin, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica. it was discovered by Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd on the South Pole flight of November 28–29, 1929, and named by him for Rear Admiral William A. Moffett, U.S. Navy, first Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Department of the Navy.

Steagall Glacier is a tributary glacier, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, draining the east slopes of Rawson Plateau between Mount Alice Gade and Mount Deardorff and flowing north to enter Bowman Glacier, in the Queen Maud Mountains. First mapped by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928-30. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Jack Steagall, meteorologist, South Pole Station winter party, 1961.

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Wisconsin Range

The Wisconsin Range is a major mountain range of the Horlick Mountains in Antarctica, comprising the Wisconsin Plateau and numerous glaciers, ridges and peaks bounded by the Reedy Glacier, Shimizu Ice Stream, Horlick Ice Stream and the interior ice plateau.

Leverett Glacier in Antarctica is about 50 nautical miles (90 km) long and 3 to 4 nautical miles wide, draining northward from the Watson Escarpment, between California Plateau and Stanford Plateau, and then trending west-northwest between the Tapley Mountains and Harold Byrd Mountains to terminate at the head of the Ross Ice Shelf close east of Scott Glacier. It was discovered in December 1929 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition geological party under Laurence Gould, and named by him for Frank Leverett, an eminent geologist at the University of Michigan and an authority on the glacial geology of the central United States.

The Tapley Mountains is a mountain range fronting on the eastern side of the Scott Glacier, extending eastward for 56 kilometres (35 mi) between Leverett and Albanus glaciers in the Queen Maud Mountains, a part of the larger Transantarctic Mountains.

Byrd Glacier glacier in Antarctica

The Byrd Glacier is a major glacier in Antarctica, about 136 km long and 24 km wide, draining an extensive area of the polar plateau and flowing eastward between the Britannia Range and Churchill Mountains to discharge into the Ross Ice Shelf at Barne Inlet. Its valley below the glacier is the lowest point not to covered by water on Earth which reaches 2,780 m below sea level. It was named by the NZ-APC after Rear Admiral Byrd, US Navy, American Antarctic explorer.

Churchill Mountains mountain range in Antarctica

The Churchill Mountains are a mountain range group of the Transantarctic Mountains System, located in the Ross Dependency region of Antarctica. They border on the western side of the Ross Ice Shelf, between Byrd Glacier and Nimrod Glacier.

Amundsen Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Amundsen Glacier is a major Antarctic glacier, about 6 to 10 km wide and 128 km (80 mi) long, originating on the polar plateau where it drains the area to the south and west of Nilsen Plateau, and descending through the Queen Maud Mountains to enter the Ross Ice Shelf just west of the MacDonald Nunataks. The tributary Blackwall Glacier flows northwest along the northeast side of Hansen Spur to join Amundsen Glacier.

Hughes Range (Antarctica)

The Hughes Range is a high massive north-south trending mountain range in Antarctica, surmounted by six prominent summits, of which Mount Kaplan is the highest. The range is located east of Canyon Glacier in the Queen Maud Mountains and extends 72 km (45 mi) from the confluence of Brandau and Keltie glaciers in the south, to the Giovinco Ice Piedmont in the north.

Bush Mountains

The Bush Mountains is a series of rugged elevations at the heads of the Ramsey and Kosco glaciers in Antarctica.

Quarles Range is a high and rugged range of the Queen Maud Mountains, extending from the polar plateau between Cooper and Bowman Glaciers and terminating near the edge of Ross Ice Shelf. Peaks in the range were first sighted by Captain Roald Amundsen in 1911, and the range was mapped in detail by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928–30. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Donald A. Quarles, Sec. of the Air Force, 1955–57, and Deputy Sec. of Defense, 1957–59, at the outset of the International Geophysical Year and organization of U.S. activity in Antarctica.

Scott Glacier (Transantarctic Mountains)

The Scott Glacier is a major glacier, 120 miles (190 km) long, that drains the East Antarctic Ice Sheet through the Queen Maud Mountains to the Ross Ice Shelf. The Scott Glacier is one of a series of major glaciers flowing across the Transantarctic Mountains, with the Amundsen Glacier to the west and the Leverett and Reedy glaciers to the east.

Haas Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Haas Glacier is a steep tributary glacier draining northward from Rawson Plateau to enter the south side of Bowman Glacier, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Charles G. Haas, a meteorologist in the South Pole Station winter party, 1960.

Poulter Glacier is a glacier in Antarctica, about 180 miles from the South Pole at an elevation of 8,000 feet. It flows east from the Antarctic Plateau past the Rawson Mountains in the Queen Maud Mountains and joins with the Scott Glacier. It was discovered by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition II Geology Party under Quinn Blackburn. It was named by Admiral Richard Byrd for Thomas Poulter.

Nickerson Ice Shelf, is an ice shelf about 35 miles wide, lying north of Siemiatkowski Glacier and the western part of Ruppert Coast, Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. First observed and roughly mapped by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (ByrdAE) (1928-30). Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Commander H.J. Nickerson, U.S. Navy (USN), administrative officer on the staff of the Commander, Task Force 43, during Operation Deep Freeze 1966.

Bartlett Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Bartlett Glacier is a tributary glacier, about 30 nautical miles (60 km) long and 5 nautical miles (10 km) wide at its terminus, flowing northeast from Nilsen Plateau and joining Scott Glacier close north of Mount Gardiner. It was discovered in December 1934 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition geological party under Quin Blackburn, and named by Richard E. Byrd for Captain Robert A. Bartlett of Brigus, Newfoundland, a noted Arctic navigator and explorer who recommended that the expedition acquire the Bear, an ice-ship which was purchased and rechristened by Byrd as the Bear of Oakland.

Noville Peninsula

Noville Peninsula is a high ice-covered peninsula about 30 nautical miles (60 km) long, between Peale and Murphy Inlets on the north side of Thurston Island in Antarctica. Delineated from aerial photographs made by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946. Named for George O. Noville, executive officer of Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1933-35.

Gerry Glacier

Gerry Glacier is a glacier on Edward VII Peninsula, Antarctica, flowing north between Reeves Peninsula and the Howard Heights to the head of Sulzberger Bay. Features in this area were photographed from the air and mapped by the Byrd Antarctic Expeditions, 1928–30 and 1933–35. This glacier was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959–65, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for U.S. Senator Peter G. Gerry of Rhode Island, a long-time friend of the Byrd family and a contributor to the 1933–35 expedition.

Kiel Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Kiel Glacier is a broad, heavily crevassed glacier descending southwest from Edward VII Peninsula, Antarctica, just east of the Rockefeller Mountains. The glacier was partially delineated from aerial photographs obtained by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1928–30) and subsequently was observed from the air by several U.S. expeditions to the area. It is named for driver Max R. Kiel, U.S. Navy, of the Mobile Construction Battalion, who lost his life on March 5, 1956, when his tractor fell into a crevasse about 20 nautical miles (40 km) westward of this glacier while attempting to establish a trail to Byrd Station.

References

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.