Raymond L. Quigley

Last updated
Raymond L. Quigley
Raymond L. Quigley.png
Biographical details
Born(1885-05-20)May 20, 1885
Princeton, Illinois
DiedMarch 9, 1958(1958-03-09) (aged 72)
Fresno, California
Playing career
Football
1908 Chicago
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1910–1911 Northern Normal and Industrial
1912 Arizona
Basketball
1912–1914 Arizona
Baseball
1913 Arizona
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1910–1912 Northern Normal and Industrial
1912–1913 Arizona
Head coaching record
Overall10–7 (football)
10–4 (basketball)
1–0 (baseball)

Raymond Leamore Quigley (May 20, 1885 – March 9, 1958) [1] was an American football player, track athlete, coach in multiple sports, and athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Northern Normal and Industrial School in South Dakota—now known as Northern State University—from 1910 to 1911 and at the University of Arizona for one season in 1912, compiling a career college football coaching record of 10–7. Quigley was also the head basketball coach at Arizona for two seasons, from 1912 to 1914, tallying a mark of 10–4, and the head baseball coach at the school for one season in 1913. Quigley served as the playground superintendent for the city of Fresno, California from 1914 until his retirement in 1953.

Contents

Playing career

Quigley attended the University of Chicago, where he played football and ran track under coach Amos Alonzo Stagg. He was the captain of the Chicago Maroons football team in 1908. [2]

Coaching career

Quigley was the head football coach at Northern Normal and Industrial School, now known as Northern State University, in Aberdeen, South Dakota for two seasons, 1910 and 1911, where he compiled a record of 8–6. [3] He was also the school's athletic director during that time. [4]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Northern Normal and Industrial (Independent)(1910–1911)
1910 Northern Normal and Industrial7–1
1911 Northern Normal and Industrial1–5
Northern Normal and Industrial:8–6
Arizona (Independent)(1912)
1912 Arizona 2–1
Arizona:2–1
Total:10–7

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References

  1. Lloyd, Paula (February 1, 2010). "Moore was first black rancher in Valley". The Fresno Bee . Archived from the original on March 21, 2012. Retrieved June 17, 2011.
  2. "Raymond Quigley" (PDF). Fresno Athletic Hall of Fame. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 16, 2011. Retrieved June 17, 2011.
  3. Papendick, John (December 18, 2009). "Northern State football facts and figures". The American News . Retrieved June 17, 2011.
  4. "Aberdeen". Freeman Courier. September 5, 1912. Retrieved June 17, 2011.