Raymond Rouleau

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Raymond Rouleau
Born(1904-06-14)14 June 1904
Brussels, Belgium
Died1 December 1981(1981-12-01) (aged 77)
Paris, France
OccupationActor
Film director
Years active1928–1981

Raymond Rouleau (14 June 1904 1 December 1981) was a Belgian actor and film director. [1] He appeared in 49 films between 1928 and 1979. He also directed 22 films between 1932 and 1981. He was married to the actress Françoise Lugagne.

Contents

Partial filmography

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References

  1. "Raymond Rouleau". Allocine. Retrieved 28 April 2020.