Recklinghausen (district)

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Recklinghausen
Flagge Kreis Recklinghausen.svg
DEU Kreis Recklinghausen COA.svg
Recklinghausen (district)
Country Germany
State North Rhine-Westphalia
Adm. region Münster
Capital Recklinghausen
Area
  Total760.27 km2 (293.54 sq mi)
Population
 (31 December 2021) [1]
  Total612,801
  Density810/km2 (2,100/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
Vehicle registration RE, GLA, CAS

Recklinghausen (German pronunciation: [ʁɛklɪŋˈhaʊzən] ) is a Kreis (district) in the centre of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is surrounded by the neighbouring districts of Borken, Coesfeld, Unna, Gelsenkirchen, Bottrop, and Wesel. The district administration is located in the city of the same name.

Contents

Apart from the Region Hannover, Kreis Recklinghausen is the largest non-city district in Germany by population. [2]

History

During medieval times, the area surrounding present-day Recklinghausen was known as Vest Recklinghausen, a territory which belonged to the Electorate of Cologne. From 1446 to 1576, this area was leased to the lordship of Gemen (now a part of the city Borken) and Schaumburg-Lippe. In 1811, the territory was added to the Grand Duchy of Berg, and in 1815 it became part of the Prussian Province of Westphalia.[ citation needed ]

The district was created in 1816. After several changes it obtained its present borders with the last reorganizations of 1975–76.[ citation needed ] It is also one of the oldest districts located in Germany.[ citation needed ]

Geography

The district Recklinghausen is located at the north of the Ruhr area with the urban parts of Ruhr area to the south and the rural Münsterland to the north. [3] The Lippe River flows through the district.

Coat of arms

The coat of arms show a silver nettle leaf on green ground - the sign of the Herrlichkeit Lembeck, an Amt (subdivision) in the clerical state of Münster. The black cross is the sign of the Bishops of Cologne who owned a big part of the district's area, the Vest Recklinghausen. The key inside the cross symbolizes St. Peter, the patron of Cologne. [4]

Towns and municipalities

Clickable map of towns and municipalities in the district Municipalities in RE.svgHerneMarl
Clickable map of towns and municipalities in the district
  1. Castrop-Rauxel
  2. Datteln
  3. Dorsten
  4. Gladbeck
  1. Haltern am See
  2. Herten
  3. Marl
  4. Oer-Erkenschwick
  1. Recklinghausen
  2. Waltrop

Partner districts

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References

  1. "Bevölkerung der Gemeinden Nordrhein-Westfalens am 31. Dezember 2021" (in German). Landesbetrieb Information und Technik NRW . Retrieved 20 June 2022.
  2. "Regionales".
  3. "Recklinghausen | Germany | Britannica".
  4. "Wappen der deutschen Stadt- und Landkreise – Heraldik-Wiki".
  5. http://www.kreis-re.de/Inhalte/Buergerservice/Zahlen_Daten_Fakten/_Partnerkreise.asp

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Kreis Recklinghausen at Wikimedia Commons:

Coordinates: 51°40′N7°10′E / 51.67°N 7.17°E / 51.67; 7.17