Red Hayworth

Last updated
Red Hayworth
Catcher
Born:(1916-05-14)May 14, 1916
High Point, North Carolina
Died: November 2, 2006(2006-11-02) (aged 90)
High Point, North Carolina
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
April 21, 1944, for the St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
September 22, 1945, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Batting average .212
Home runs 1
Runs batted in 42
Teams

Myron Claude "Red" Hayworth (May 14, 1916 – November 2, 2006) was an American professional baseball player, manager, coach and scout. [1] He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1944 to 1945, most notably as a member of the only St. Louis Browns team to win an American League pennant in 1944. He was listed at 6 ft 1.5 in (1.87 m), 200 lb. Hayworth batted and threw right-handed. [1]

Baseball team sport

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objective of the offensive team is to hit the ball into the field of play, allowing its players to run the bases, having them advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate. The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

Manager (baseball) Someone who manages a baseball team

In baseball, the field manager is the equivalent of a head coach who is responsible for overseeing and making final decisions on all aspects of on-field team strategy, lineup selection, training and instruction. Managers are typically assisted by a staff of assistant coaches whose responsibilities are specialized. Field managers are typically not involved in off-field personnel decisions or long-term club planning, responsibilities that are instead held by a team's general manager.

In baseball, a number of coaches assist in the smooth functioning of a team. They are assistants to the manager, who determines the lineup and decides how to substitute players during the game. Beyond the manager, more than a half dozen coaches may assist the manager in running the team. Essentially, baseball coaches are analogous to assistant coaches in other sports, as the baseball manager is to the head coach.

Contents

Baseball career

Hayworth was born in High Point, North Carolina. [1] He spent more than 50 years in baseball. Considered a light-hitting but solid catcher, he started his professional career in 1936 with the Akron Yankees. After eight years in the minor leagues, he entered the majors in 1944 as one of two catchers for the only St. Louis Browns club to ever win an American League pennant. He shared duties with Frank Mancuso, hitting .222 in 90 games. The Browns lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1944 World Series as Hayworth started all six games, collecting two hits in 17 at bats with one run and an RBI. He played his last majors season with St. Louis in 1945.

High Point, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

High Point is a city located in the Piedmont Triad region of the U.S. state of North Carolina. Most of the city is located in Guilford County, with portions spilling into neighboring Randolph, Davidson, and Forsyth counties. High Point is North Carolina's only city that extends into four counties. As of the 2010 census the city had a total population of 104,371, with an estimated population of 112,316 in 2018. High Point is currently the ninth-largest municipality in North Carolina, and the 259th largest city in America.

The Akron Yankees were a minor league baseball team that existed from 1935 until 1941. A class C farm team of the New York Yankees, the club was based in Akron, Ohio and played in the Middle Atlantic League.

American League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League.

In a two-season career, Hayworth was a .212 hitter (91-for-430) with one home run and 42 RBI in 146 games, including 27 runs, 15 doubles, and one triple. [1]

Home run in baseball, a four-base hit resulting in a run by the batter

In baseball, a home run is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. A home run with a high exit velocity and good launch angle is sometimes called a "no-doubter," because it leaves no doubt that it is going to leave the park when it leaves the bat.

In baseball, a double is the act of a batter striking the pitched ball and safely reaching second base without being called out by the umpire, without the benefit of a fielder's misplay or another runner being put out on a fielder's choice. A double is a type of hit and is sometimes called a "two-bagger" or "two-base hit". For statistical and scorekeeping purposes it is denoted by 2B.

Triple (baseball) in baseball, a three-base hit

In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base after hitting the ball, with neither the benefit of a fielder's misplay nor another runner being put out on a fielder's choice. A triple is sometimes called a "three-bagger" or "three-base hit". For statistical and scorekeeping purposes it is denoted by 3B.

Following his major league career, Hayworth played, managed and coached in the minor leagues and later served as a scout until the late 1980s. His older brother, Ray Hayworth, also was a major league catcher. [1]

Ray Hayworth American baseball player and coach

Raymond Hall Hayworth was an American professional baseball player, manager and scout. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball between 1926 and 1945, most notably as a member of the Detroit Tigers team that won two consecutive American League pennants in 1934 and 1935 and won the 1935 World Series. He was employed in professional baseball for nearly 50 years from 1926 to 1973.

Hayworth died in his hometown of High Point, North Carolina, at the age of 90.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Red Hayworth statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 16, 2019.