Red Threlfall

Last updated
Red Threlfall
Biographical details
Born1903 (1903)
Died(1971-02-16)February 16, 1971
Sioux City, Iowa
Playing career
Football
1924 Purdue
Position(s) Center
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1927 Bates (assistant)
1934–1937 South Dakota State
1938–1944 Winnipeg Blue Bombers
Basketball
1930–1933 South Dakota State
1936–1937 South Dakota State
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1935 South Dakota State
Head coaching record
Overall17–19–2 (college football)
25–32 (college basketball)

Reginald H. "Red" Threlfall (1903 – February 16, 1971) was an American football, basketball and Canadian football coach. [1] He served as the head football coach at South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota from 1934 to 1937, compiling a record of 17–19–2. [2] Threlfall was the head coach of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the Canadian Football League (CFL) from 1938 to 1944. [3]

Contents

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
South Dakota State Jackrabbits (North Central Conference)(1934–1937)
1934 South Dakota State 6–42–24th
1935 South Dakota State 4–4–11–3–15th
1936 South Dakota State 3–6–11–4–17th
1937 South Dakota State 4–52–36th
South Dakota State:17–19–26–12–2
Total:17–19–2

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The 1934 South Dakota State Jackrabbits football team was an American football team that represented South Dakota State University in the North Central Conference (NCC) during the 1934 college football season. In its first season under head coach Red Threlfall, the team compiled a 6–4 record and outscored opponents by a total of 189 to 72.

The 1935 South Dakota State Jackrabbits football team was an American football team that represented South Dakota State University in the North Central Conference (NCC) during the 1935 college football season. In its second season under head coach Red Threlfall, the team compiled a 4–4–1 record and outscored opponents by a total of 123 to 92.

The 1936 South Dakota State Jackrabbits football team was an American football team that represented South Dakota State University in the North Central Conference (NCC) during the 1936 college football season. In its third season under head coach Red Threlfall, the team compiled a 3–6–1 record and was outscored by a total of 116 to 51.

The 1937 South Dakota State Jackrabbits football team was an American football team that represented South Dakota State University in the North Central Conference (NCC) during the 1937 college football season. In its fourth season under head coach Red Threlfall, the team compiled a 4–5 record and was outscored by a total of 147 to 102.

References

  1. "Reginald Threlfall". Find a Grave. Retrieved October 18, 2018.
  2. "Memory Of Friends Glows Through The Golden Years". Yankton.net. Retrieved October 18, 2018.
  3. "Winnipeggers Love Him". Winnipeg Free Press . February 18, 1971. Retrieved October 18, 2018.