Reg Parker (rugby league)

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Reg Parker
Personal information
Bornfourth ¼ 1927
Ulverston district, England
Died13 November 2014(2014-11-13) (aged 86–87)
Grange-over-Sands, England
Playing information
Position Prop, Second-row
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1948–58 Barrow 24139
1958 Wakefield Trinity 8
1958–60 Blackpool Borough
Total24939000
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
Lancashire 10000
1955 England 10000
Coaching information
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
197477 Great Britain
1984 England 1100100
Source: [1] [2] [3]

Reg Parker (fourth ¼ 1927 [4] – 13 November 2014) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, coach of the 1970s, and was an administrator of the 1980s. He played at representative level for England and Lancashire, and at club level for Whitehouse Juniors ARLFC, Barrow, Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 645), and Blackpool Borough, as a prop, or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums, [1] coached at representative level for Great Britain, [3] [5] and was the chairman of the Rugby Football League (RFL) for the 1984–85 Rugby Football League season.

Contents

Background

Parker's birth was registered in Ulverston district, Lancashire, England, and he died aged 87 at Cartmel Grange Care Home, Grange-over-Sands, Cumbria, his funeral service took place at St Paul's Parish Church, Grange-over-Sands, at 1 pm on Tuesday 25 November 2014, followed by a reception at the Netherwood Hotel

Playing career

International honours

Parker won a cap for England while at Barrow in 1955 against Other Nationalities. [2]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Parker played right-second-row, i.e. number 12, in Barrow's 21-12 victory over Workington Town in the 1955 Challenge Cup Final during the 1954–55 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 30 April 1955, in front of a crowd of 66,513, [6] and played right-prop, i.e. number 10, in the 7–9 defeat by Leeds in the 1957 Challenge Cup Final during the 1956–57 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 11 May 1957, in front of a crowd of 76,318.

County Cup Final appearances

Parker played right-second-row, i.e. number 12, and scored a try in Barrow's 12–2 victory over Oldham in the 1954 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1954–55 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 23 October 1954. [7]

Club career

Parker made his début for Barrow against Belle Vue Rangers in 1948, he was transferred in 1958 for £800 (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £38,470 in 2013), [8] and he made his début for Wakefield Trinity playing Second-row (replacing an injured Ken Traill) in the 17–12 victory over St. Helens at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Saturday 1 February 1958, also making their début in that match were Geoffrey Oakes and Harold Poynton, due to the difficulties in travelling from Grange-over-Sands to Wakefield, at the end of the 1957–58 season he was transferred to Blackpool Borough, where he later became a director.

Coaching career

International honours

Parker was Great Britain's manager for the 19 7 4 tour of Australia and New Zealand, and the 1977 World Cup. [9]

Parker coached England for one game v Wales in a 28-9 win on 14 Oct 1984 in Ebbw Vale.

Genealogical information

Reg Parker's marriage to Shirley (née Cummock birth registered third ¼ 1930 (age 9091) in Barton-upon-Irwell district) was registered during fourth ¼ 1949 in Ulverston district. [10] They had children; Karen S. Parker (birth registered first ¼ 1953 (age 6768) in Ulverston district), and Simon L. Parker (birth registered fourth ¼ 1956 (age 6465) in Ulverston district). S Louise Parker (birth registered July - August 1963 (age 54-55) in Ulverston district).

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  5. "Back on the Wembley trail". nwemail.co.uk. 31 December 2013. Archived from the original on 9 October 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  6. "Saturday, October 1 1983…". nwemail.co.uk. 31 December 2013. Archived from the original on 4 March 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  7. "Barrow make two finals in one year". nwemail.co.uk. 31 December 2013. Archived from the original on 29 November 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  8. "Measuring Worth – Relative Value of UK Pounds". Measuring Worth. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  9. Paddy McAteer (22 December 2010) "Whole World in their Hands" Archived 5 October 2012 at the Wayback Machine North West Evening Mail
  10. "Marriage details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.