Regional council (Israel)

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Regional councils (plural: Hebrew : מוֹעָצוֹת אֵזוֹרִיּוֹת, Mo'atzot Ezoriyot [1] / singular: Hebrew : מוֹעָצָה אֵזוֹרִית, Mo'atza Ezorit [1] ) are one of the three types of Israel's local government entities, with the other two being cities and local councils. As of 2019, there were 54 regional councils, usually responsible for governing a number of settlements spread across rural areas. [2] [3] Regional councils include representation of anywhere between 3 and 54 communities, usually spread over a relatively large area within geographical vicinity of each other. [2]

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Each community within a regional council usually does not exceed 2,000 in population and is managed by a local committee. This committee sends representatives to the administering regional council proportionate to their size of membership and according to an index which is fixed before each election. [2] Those settlements without an administrative council do not send any representatives to the regional council, instead being dealt by it directly. [2] Representatives from those settlements which are represented directly are either chosen directly or through an election. [2] The predominant form of communities represented on regional councils are kibbutzim and moshavim. [4]

List of regional councils

Offices of the Menashe Regional Council Menashe Regional Council offices.JPG
Offices of the Menashe Regional Council

The following sortable table lists all 53 regional councils by name, and the district or area according to the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. [5]

The list includes the regional councils in the Golan Heights and the West Bank, areas considered occupied territories under international law, [6] [7] [8] [9] although the Israeli government disputes this. [10]

CouncilLink District
al-Batuf Regional Council North
al-Kasom Regional Council South
Alona Regional Council Haifa
Be'er Tuvia Regional Council South
Bnei Shimon Regional Council South
Brenner Regional Council Center
Bustan al-Marj Regional Council North
Central Arava Regional Council South
Drom HaSharon Regional Council Center
Eshkol Regional Council South
Lower Galilee Regional Council North
Upper Galilee Regional Council North
Gan Raveh Regional Council Center
Gederot Regional Council Center
Gezer Regional Council Center
Gilboa Regional Council North
Golan Regional Council North
Gush Etzion Regional Council Judea and Samaria
Har Hebron Regional Council Judea and Samaria
Hefer Valley Regional Council (Emek Hefer) Center
Hevel Eilot Regional Council South
Hevel Modi'in Regional Council Center
Hevel Yavne Regional Council Center
Hof Ashkelon Regional Council South
Hof HaCarmel Regional Council Haifa
Hof HaSharon Regional Council Center
Jezreel Valley Regional Council (Emek Yizreel) North
Northern Jordan Valley (Emek HaYarden) North
Southern Jordan Valley (Bik'at HaYarden) Judea and Samaria
Lakhish Regional Council South
Lev HaSharon Regional Council Center
Ma'ale Yosef Regional Council North
Mateh Asher Regional Council North
Mateh Binyamin Regional Council Judea and Samaria
Mateh Yehuda Regional Council Jerusalem
Megiddo Regional Council North
Megilot Regional Council Judea and Samaria
Menashe Regional Council Haifa
Merhavim Regional Council South
Merom HaGalil Regional Council North
Mevo'ot HaHermon Regional Council North
Misgav Regional Council North
Nahal Sorek Regional Council Center
Neve Midbar Regional Council South
Ramat HaNegev Regional Council South
Sdot Dan Regional Council Center
Sdot Negev Regional Council (Azata) South
Sha'ar HaNegev Regional Council South
Shafir Regional Council South
Shomron Regional Council Judea and Samaria
Tamar Regional Council South
Valley of Springs Regional Council North
Yoav Regional Council South
Zevulun Regional Council Haifa

Former regional councils

Council District
Abu Basma Regional Council South
Central Sharon Regional Council
Ef'al Regional Council Tel Aviv
Ga'aton Regional Council North
Hadar HaSharon Regional Council Center
Hof Aza Regional Council South
Kiryat Ono Regional Council
Mif'alot Afek Regional Council
Na'aman Regional Council North
Northern Sharon Regional Council Center
Sulam Tzur Regional Council North
Tel Mond Regional Council
Yarkon Regional Council

See also

Related Research Articles

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Efrat Israeli settlement in the West Bank

Efrat, or previously officially Efrata, is an Israeli settlement established in 1983 and a local council in the Judean Mountains of the West Bank. Efrat is located 12 kilometers (7.5 mi) south of Jerusalem, between Bethlehem and Hebron, 6.5 km (4 mi) east of the Green Line, inside of the Security Barrier. The settlement stands at an altitude of up to 960 metres above sea level and covers about 6,000 dunam. The international community considers Israeli settlements in the West Bank illegal under international law, but the Israeli government disputes this.

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Israeli-occupied territories Territories presently occupied by Israel since the 1967 Six-Day War

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Immanuel (town) Israeli settlement in the West Bank

Immanuel, also spelled Emmanuel or Emanuel, is an Israeli settlement organized as a local council located in the West Bank. Immanuel was established in 1983. In 2019 it had a population of 3,906; its jurisdiction is spread out over 2,750 dunams (2.75 km²).

Tekoa, Gush Etzion Israeli settlement in the West Bank

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Otniel Israeli settlement in the West Bank

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Kalya Israeli settlement in the West Bank

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Hashmonaim Israeli settlement in the West Bank

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Almon, Mateh Binyamin Israeli settlement in the West Bank

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Halamish Israeli settlement in the West Bank

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Nofei Prat Place in Judea and Samaria Area

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Psagot Israeli settlement in the West Bank

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Area C (West Bank)

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References

  1. 1 2 https://milog.co.il/מוֹעָצוֹת_אֵזוֹרִיּוֹת
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Herzog, Hanna. Gendering Politics: Women in Israel. University of Michigan Press. p. 22.
  3. Mahler, Gregory S. Politics and Government in Israel: The Maturation of a Modern State. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 229.
  4. Troen, Selwyn Ilan; Noah Lucas. Israel: The First Decade of Independence. SUNY Press. p. 496.
  5. "Table 2.13 - Localities and Population, by Municipal Status and District" (PDF). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. 2018-09-04. Retrieved 2019-03-11.
  6. Resolution 446, Resolution 465, Resolution 484, among others
  7. "Applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including Jerusalem, and the other occupied Arab territories". United Nations. 17 December 2003. Retrieved 2006-09-27.
  8. "Legal Consequences of the Construction of a Wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory". International Court of Justice. 9 July 2004. Retrieved 2006-09-27.
  9. "Implementation of the Fourth Geneva Convention in the occupied Palestinian territories: history of a multilateral process (1997-2001)". International Review of the Red Cross. International Committee of the Red Cross. 30 September 2002. Retrieved 2012-10-11.
  10. "The Geneva Convention". BBC News. 10 December 2009. Retrieved 2013-03-13.