Regions of Senegal

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Senegal is subdivided into 14 regions (French: régions, singular région), each of which is administered by a Conseil Régional (pl.: Conseils Régionaux) elected by population weight at the arrondissement level. Senegal is further subdivided into 45 departments, 103 arrondissements (neither of which have administrative function) and by collectivités locales (the 14 regions, 110 communes, and 320 communautés rurales) which elect administrative officers. [1] Three of these regions were created on 10 September 2008, when Kaffrine Region was split from Kaolack, Kédougou region was split from Tambacounda, and Sédhiou region was split from Kolda.

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Regions of Senegal Regions of Senegal.svg
Regions of Senegal

To date, all regions take their name from their regional capitals.

RegionCapital
Area
(km2)
Population
(2013 census)
[2]
Dakar Dakar 5473,137,196
Ziguinchor Ziguinchor 7,352549,151
Diourbel Diourbel 4,8241,497,455
Saint-Louis Saint-Louis 19,241908,942
Tambacounda Tambacounda 42,364681,310
Kaolack Kaolack   5,357960,875
Thiès Thiès 6,6701,788,864
Louga Louga 24,889874,193
Fatick Fatick 6,849835,352
Kolda Kolda 13,771714,392
Matam Matam 29,445562,539
Kaffrine Kaffrine 11,262566,992
Kédougou Kédougou 16,800152,357
Sédhiou Sédhiou 7,341452,944
The Conseil Regional building in Ziguinchor. Regions, unlike Departments or Arrondissements (but like Communes), have defined administrative and political power in Senegal. Ziguinchor10.JPG
The Conseil Régional building in Ziguinchor. Regions, unlike Departments or Arrondissements (but like Communes), have defined administrative and political power in Senegal.

See also

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References

  1. List of current local elected officials Archived 2007-08-19 at the Wayback Machine from Union des Associations d’ Elus Locaux (UAEL) du Sénégal. See also the law creating current local government structures: (in French) Code des collectivités locales, Loi n° 96-06 du 22 mars 1996.
  2. Senegal Archived 2015-04-19 at the Wayback Machine at GeoHive.