René Arnoux

Last updated
René Arnoux
Rene Arnoux WSR2008 HU.png
Arnoux in 2008
Born (1948-07-04) 4 July 1948 (age 70)
Pontcharra, Isère, France
Formula One World Championship career
Nationality Flag of France.svg French
Active years 19781989
Teams Martini, Surtees, Renault, Ferrari, Ligier
Entries165 (149 starts)
Championships 0
Wins 7
Podiums22
Career points181
Pole positions 18
Fastest laps 12
First entry 1978 South African Grand Prix
First win 1980 Brazilian Grand Prix
Last win 1983 Dutch Grand Prix
Last entry 1989 Australian Grand Prix

René Alexandre Arnoux (born 4 July 1948) [1] is a French former racing driver who competed in 12 Formula One seasons (1978 to 1989). He participated in 165 World Championship Grands Prix (149 starts) winning seven of them, achieving 22 podium finishes and scoring 181 career points. His best finish in the World Drivers' Championship was third in 1983 for Ferrari. In 1977, Arnoux won the European Formula Two Championship. In 2006 he raced in the inaugural season of the Grand Prix Masters series for retired F1 drivers.

Formula One is the highest class of single-seater auto racing sanctioned by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) and owned by the Formula One Group. The FIA Formula One World Championship has been one of the premier forms of racing around the world since its inaugural season in 1950. The word "formula" in the name refers to the set of rules to which all participants' cars must conform. A Formula One season consists of a series of races, known as Grands Prix, which take place worldwide on purpose-built circuits and on public roads.

Scuderia Ferrari S.p.A. is the racing division of luxury Italian auto manufacturer Ferrari and the racing team that competes in Formula One racing. The team is also nicknamed "The Prancing Horse", with reference to their logo. It is the oldest surviving and most successful Formula One team, having competed in every world championship since the 1950 Formula One season. The team was founded by Enzo Ferrari, initially to race cars produced by Alfa Romeo, though by 1947 Ferrari had begun building its own cars. Among its important achievements outside Formula One are winning the World Sportscar Championship, 24 Hours of Le Mans, 24 Hours of Spa, 24 Hours of Daytona, 12 Hours of Sebring, Bathurst 12 Hour, races for Grand tourer cars and racing on road courses of the Targa Florio, the Mille Miglia and the Carrera Panamericana.

The European Formula Two Championship was a Formula Two motor racing series that was held between 1967–84. The races were held across Europe, and were contested both by drivers aiming to compete in Formula One in the future as well as current Formula One drivers wishing to practice. The series was sanctioned by the FIA, motorsports world governing body.

Contents

Early career

Arnoux's career began in Formule Renault and he first moved into Formula Two in 1974 with Elf, taking fourth place on his debut at Nogaro. [1] In 1975 he moved to Formule Super Renault and won the title. [1] For 1976, Arnoux moved back to Formula Two with an Elf-sponsored, works Martini-Renault, winning three races and narrowly losing the title to Jean-Pierre Jabouille. [1] However, he won the 1977 European Championship, again driving a Martini-Renault. [1] Arnoux won races at Silverstone, Hockenheim, Pau and Nogaro, which along with second places at Enna-Pergusa and Estoril saw him finish 12 points clear of American Eddie Cheever who was driving for Ron Dennis' Project Four Racing, and 14 points clear of teammate Didier Pironi.

Formula Two race car class

Formula Two, abbreviated to F2, is a type of open wheel formula racing first codified in 1948. It was replaced in 1985 by Formula 3000, but revived by the FIA from 2009–2012 in the form of the FIA Formula Two Championship. The name returned in 2017 when the former GP2 Series became known as the FIA Formula 2 Championship.

Circuit Paul Armagnac motorsport track in France

Circuit Paul Armagnac also known as Circuit de Nogaro is a motorsport race track near Nogaro in southwestern France.

Automobiles Martini is a constructor of Formula racing cars from France, founded by Renato "Tico" Martini in 1965, when Martini and partner Bill Knight founded the Winfield Racing School at the Magny-Cours circuit, in France. Martini's first car was the MW3, a Formula Three car built in 1968.

Formula One

Martini / Surtees

Arnoux continued with the Martini team when it made the transition to Formula One in 1978. However, in an organisation with insufficient means to compete in the highest echelon of the sport, Arnoux was unable to demonstrate his abilities and Martini abandoned Formula One during the season, having run short of money. Arnoux's best finishes for Martini were two 9th places in Belgium and Austria. He failed to qualify in South Africa, and failed to pre-qualify in Monaco and Germany.

The 1978 Formula One season was the 32nd season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1978 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the International Cup for F1 Constructors, contested concurrently over a sixteen race series which commenced on 15 January and ended on 8 October. The season also included the non-championship BRDC International Trophy.

1978 Belgian Grand Prix Formula One race

The 1978 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 21 May 1978 at Zolder. It was the sixth race of the 1978 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1978 International Cup for F1 Constructors. The 70-lap race was won from pole position by Mario Andretti, driving the new Lotus 79. Teammate Ronnie Peterson was second in the older Lotus 78, with Carlos Reutemann third in a Ferrari.

1978 Austrian Grand Prix

The 1978 Austrian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 13 August 1978 at Österreichring.

Arnoux moved to Surtees for the last two races of the season, but once again found himself in a team on the edge of failure. Unlike team owner John Surtees who had won the F1 World Championship in 1964, Team Surtees was rarely a front runner in Grand Prix racing. In his two races for the team Arnoux's best finish was his first race where he placed 9th at Watkins Glen for the United States Grand Prix. Arnoux qualified the Surtees TS20 in 21st place at Watkins Glen, while teammate Beppe Gabbiani failed to qualify. His last race for the team in Canada saw him qualify an encouraging 16th but retire just after half distance when the Ford DFV engine failed. Surtees would have liked to sign Arnoux on a permanent basis, but his few drives to date had demonstrated his potential to bigger teams and Arnoux signed with Renault for 1979. [1]

The Surtees Racing Organisation was a race team that spent nine seasons as a constructor in Formula One, Formula 2, and Formula 5000.

John Surtees British motorcycle and automobile racer

John Surtees, was an English Grand Prix motorcycle road racer and Formula One driver. He was a four-time 500cc motorcycle World Champion – winning that title in 1956, 1958, 1959 and 1960 – the Formula One World Champion in 1964, and remains the only person to have won World Championships on both two and four wheels. He founded the Surtees Racing Organisation team that competed as a constructor in Formula One, Formula 2 and Formula 5000 from 1970 to 1978. He was also the ambassador of the Racing Steps Foundation.

The 1964 Formula One season was the 18th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It included the 1964 World Championship of Drivers, won by John Surtees; and the 1964 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers, won by Ferrari – both of which were contested concurrently over a series which commenced on 10 May and ended on 25 October after ten races. The season also included eight non-championship races for Formula One cars.

An ex-Jabouille Renault RS01 of 1979 being demonstrated by Rene Arnoux in 2007. Renault RS01 Arnoux 2007.jpg
An ex-Jabouille Renault RS01 of 1979 being demonstrated by René Arnoux in 2007.

Renault

In the 1979 season, the factory Renault team entered two cars for the first time since its debut in 1977. The team's only victory of the year was taken by Arnoux's teammate Jean-Pierre Jabouille at the French Grand Prix at the Dijon-Prenois circuit, [2] but Arnoux took the headlines due to a fierce, but good-natured wheel-banging battle with the Flat-12 Ferrari of Gilles Villeneuve for second place. Ultimately Villeneuve would just hold off Arnoux to take second place. Arnoux began to fulfil his potential in the second half of the season with 4 top-six finishes (3 podium places) whereas Jabouille's Dijon victory was his only points finish of the year. [2] [3]

The 1979 Formula One season was the 33rd season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1979 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1979 International Cup for F1 Constructors which were contested concurrently over a fifteen-round series which commenced on 21 January 1979, and ended on 7 October. The season also included three non-championship Formula One races. Jody Scheckter of Scuderia Ferrari won the 1979 World Championship of F1 Drivers while Scuderia Ferrari won 1979 International Cup for F1 Constructors. Gilles Villeneuve made it a 1–2 for Ferrari in the championship, concluding a successful second half of the 1970s for Ferrari. Alan Jones finished the season strongly for Williams, finishing third in the championship and with teammate Clay Regazzoni scoring Williams's first ever Grand Prix win as a constructor. Scheckter's title was Ferrari's last drivers' title for 21 years, before Michael Schumacher won five consecutive titles for the team between 2000 and 2004.

Renault in Formula One French auto racing team

Renault is currently involved in Formula One as a constructor, under the name of Renault F1 Team. They have been associated with Formula One as both constructor and engine supplier for various periods since 1977. In 1977, the company entered Formula One as a constructor, introducing the turbo engine to Formula One in its first car, the Renault RS01. In 1983, Renault began supplying engines to other teams. Although the Renault team won races and competed for world titles, it withdrew at the end of 1985. Renault continued supplying engines to other teams until 1986, then again from 1989 to 1997 and at various other times since then until the present.

Jean-Pierre Jabouille racecar driver from France

Jean-Pierre Alain Jabouille is a French former racing driver. He raced in 55 Formula One Grands Prix, collecting two wins during the first years of Renault's turbocharged programme in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Jabouille also raced the 24 Hours of Le Mans from the late 1960s to the early 1990s, driving for Alpine, Matra, Sauber and Peugeot and collecting four 3rd overall finishes in 1973, 1974, 1992 and 1993. Jabouille was one of the last of a breed of Formula One drivers who were also engineers.

In 1980, Arnoux took his first two Formula One victories, the first being at a much-protested Interlagos circuit in Brazil but a lack of reliability prevented him from playing a part in the fight for the world title, although he took three pole positions. His second win came in the very next race at the Kyalami circuit in South Africa [3] where the thinner air at high altitude saw the turbocharged Renault RE20 have a power advantage over its mostly Cosworth powered rivals. At that point in the season Arnoux was leading the World Championship for the first time. He would not lose the championship lead until Round 6 in Monaco. The season though was punctuated by unreliability from the turbocharged Renault V6 engine, though progress was rapidly moving forward with the V6 proving powerful, producing approximately 510 bhp (380 kW; 517 PS)[ citation needed ] to be on par with Ferrari (and considerably more powerful than the 475 bhp (354 kW; 482 PS)[ citation needed ] Ford DFV). What generally hurt the Renaults was unreliability, and the lack of ground effects. Although he would later finish in a fine second in the Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort, he would finish the season in 6th place with 29 points, 38 points behind World Champion Alan Jones.

The 1980 Formula One season was the 34th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1980 World Championship of Drivers and the 1980 International Cup for F1 Constructors, which were contested concurrently from 13 January to 5 October over a fourteen-race series. The season also included one non-championship race, the Spanish Grand Prix.

Autódromo José Carlos Pace motorsport venue in Brazil

Autódromo José Carlos Pace, also known as Interlagos, is a motorsport circuit located in the city of São Paulo, in the neighborhood of Interlagos. It is named after Brazilian Formula One driver Carlos Pace, who died in a plane crash in 1977. It has hosted the Formula One Brazilian Grand Prix since 1973.

1980 Brazilian Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1980

The 1980 Brazilian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 27 January 1980 at the Interlagos circuit in the Interlagos neighborhood of São Paulo. It was the second round of the 1980 Formula One season, and it was also the ninth Brazilian Grand Prix. It was the eighth to be held at Interlagos and would be the last until the circuit was substantially redeveloped for the 1990 Brazilian Grand Prix. The race was held over 40 laps of the 7.87-kilometre circuit for a total race distance of 315 kilometres. This race was originally supposed to be held at the Jacarepaguá circuit in Rio de Janeiro, but was transferred to Interlagos because parts of the Rio circuit's tarmac were actually sinking into the soft swampland the circuit was built on. This last-minute switch to Interlagos- which was to be resurfaced and heavily rebuilt with new pit facilities and safety measures for the 1981 season caused a lot of controversy- Interlagos had returned a bit too soon for some of the drivers.

Arnoux's situation was complicated in 1981 by the arrival of Alain Prost at Renault. Inevitably their rivalry on track flared up off the track and relations between the two men deteriorated, dividing the small world of French motorsport. The conflict reached its peak at the 1982 French Grand Prix at the Circuit Paul Ricard. The drivers took the first one-two in Renault's history in Formula One, Arnoux finishing ahead of Prost. Prost was furious, considering that his teammate had not kept to the team orders agreed before the race, according to which he should have ceded the win to Prost, who was better placed in the 1982 championship. [1] Arnoux replied that no orders had been given before the race and that he was free to drive his own race. He took one other win at the Italian Grand Prix at the end of the season. He was also lucky to walk away from a high speed crash after losing a wheel going into the banked Tarzan corner at the end of the long straight in the 1982 Dutch Grand Prix, though luckily his car's momentum was largely stopped by the sand trap and tyre barrier.

Arnoux started at the back of the field for the 1984 Dallas Grand Prix, but climbed to second by the finish. Arnoux Ferrari 126C4 1984 Dallas F1.jpg
Arnoux started at the back of the field for the 1984 Dallas Grand Prix, but climbed to second by the finish.

Ferrari

The pairing of Prost and Arnoux having become unsustainable, Arnoux left Renault at the end of 1982 to join the other factory team in Formula One, Ferrari in 1983, joining another French driver Patrick Tambay. Prior to the Canadian Grand Prix, rumours were flying that Arnoux's place at Ferrari was under threat. However, with three victories, at the Canadian, German, and Dutch Grands Prix, he was in contention for the world title for much of the season, but was left behind by his rivals Prost and Nelson Piquet in the championship run in. [1] Both Arnoux and Tambay became favourites with the Tifosi for their hard charging styles and results saw Ferrari win the Constructors' Championship. Arnoux's win at Zandvoort would prove to be the 7th and last win of his Formula One career.

With the McLarens of Prost and Niki Lauda dominating 1984, Arnoux had a less successful second season at Ferrari, only finishing 6th with 27 points, with his new teammate Michele Alboreto progressively taking the initiative and team leadership from him. After three wins and four pole positions in 1983, Arnoux failed to win or claim a pole position in 1984 (Alboreto won the Belgian Grand Prix from pole with Arnoux starting second and finishing third), though he still drove well on occasions, finishing second in San Marino and Dallas where he was forced to start from the pits due to an electrical fault on the warm up lap and managed to keep his car out of trouble on the crumbling track. The only Grand Prix ever held in Dallas was also the last time Arnoux achieved a Formula One podium finish. As the season progressed, Arnoux appeared to lack motivation [1] and after finishing 4th in the opening race of the 1985 championship in Brazil, an 'amicable separation' [1] was agreed between him and Ferrari. His place in the team was taken by Swedish driver Stefan Johansson. He was seen in the Brabham pits at Imola in Round 3, sparking rumours he was set to join the team then owned by Bernie Ecclestone, but nothing came of it and he was rarely seen at races for the rest of the season.

Ligier

Without a drive for the rest of the 1985 season, Arnoux made his return to Formula One in 1986 for the French Ligier team who were using turbocharged Renault engines, where he delivered several good performances. However, despite maintaining his motivation, the Pirelli-tyred Ligiers were not competitive as the season progressed. Arnoux had two teammates in 1986. For the first half of the season his teammate was French driver Jacques Laffite. However, Laffite's career ended when he broke both of his legs in a first corner crash at Brands Hatch in the British Grand Prix. From the following race Laffite was replaced with yet another French driver, the fast but accident prone Philippe Alliot.

For 1987, Ligier were to have exclusive use of a new, 850 bhp (634 kW; 862 PS) four-cylinder turbocharged Alfa Romeo engine in the new Ligier JS29. [4] However, after Arnoux compared the engine to "used food" during pre-season testing, Alfa's parent company Fiat pulled the plug on the project and Ligier were forced into using the four-cylinder Megatron engines for the season and there was little to show for it in the way of results despite the Megatron (the old BMW M12/13 engine) producing around 950 bhp (708 kW; 963 PS). [5] Arnoux scored the team's only point during the season with a 6th place in Belgium. The race at Spa also saw the best finish for his teammate Piercarlo Ghinzani who finished 7th.

1988 was to prove the final year for turbos in Formula One and Ligier took the chance to race the new, 3.5-litre Judd V8 engine. The Ligier JS31 proved to be a disaster though with both Arnoux and new teammate Stefan Johansson struggling, often only just making it onto the grid or simply failing to qualify, with both drivers often complaining that even in dry conditions the lack of grip saw them forced to drive with a wet weather technique. Although he only failed to qualify twice during the season (San Marino and France – Johansson failed to make the grid 6 times), his best finish of the year was a disappointing 10th place in the Portuguese Grand Prix. It was the first time since his debut season in 1978 that Arnoux failed to score a World Championship point. His DNQ at Imola was the first time he had failed to qualify for a race since the 1981 Belgian Grand Prix. His season finished on a sour note when he took out race leader Gerhard Berger while being lapped at the 1988 Australian Grand Prix (though of all the experts and commentators who blamed Arnoux for taking out Berger's Ferrari in Adelaide and ruining the race as a spectacle, Berger himself refused to do so, citing a "very long" brake pedal after his hot pace which meant he couldn't stop to avoid Arnoux, nor pass him more easily as he normally would have. He also cited the fact that with his turbo boost turned up to full, the Ferrari would have run out of fuel long before the race ended).

Arnoux's fall to the back of the grid didn't change in 1989, despite the new Ford DFR powered Ligier JS33 showing promise. Towards the end of his career, Arnoux had attracted some controversy; he was frequently accused of not using his mirrors and blocking faster cars in qualifying and when being lapped (a trait he seemingly passed on to his 1989 rookie teammate Olivier Grouillard), even taking off a number of cars as well. During the 1989 Monaco Grand Prix, BBC commentator Murray Walker remarked that Arnoux's claimed reason for going so slow at that stage of his career was that he was used to turbo powered cars and that the naturally aspirated cars were "a completely different kettle of fish to drive — he says". Walker's co-commentator, 1976 World Champion James Hunt's reply was typically blunt as he said "And all I can say to that is bullshit". [6] Arnoux received criticism after the race for continually ignoring the blue flags, with former Renault teammate Prost in particular held up by the Ligier which refused to let the McLaren past for a number of laps. This cost Prost some 20 seconds in his pursuit of teammate Ayrton Senna and for a number of laps the Ligier had a crocodile line of cars behind him as he refused to move over and let faster cars through. [7]

Arnoux finished his career with 181 World Championship points, with his last points coming from a 5th place at the 1989 Canadian Grand Prix. His last race was the very wet 1989 Australian Grand Prix in Adelaide where his Ligier was pushed into retirement by the Arrows of Eddie Cheever after just 4 laps. Showing he still had skill as a driver, Arnoux was second fastest to the McLaren-Honda of outgoing World Champion, pole man and acknowledged rain master Ayrton Senna in the extra half-hour warm-up that was scheduled to let drivers and teams set up their cars for what would be a wet race after three days of typically sunny Australian weather.

Post career

René Arnoux has since started an indoor karting business called Kart'in, consisting of four tracks in France, two in the Parisian area, one in the suburbs of Lyons and one near Marseille. He also owns and manages two factories, frequently appears and drives in historical events on behalf of Renault and resides in Paris.

Arnoux was one of the drivers invited to take part in the Grand Prix Masters championship in 2006 and 2007, restricted to former Formula One drivers. In 2007 and 2008 he drove for the Renault H&C Classic Team, when he presented and drove Alain Prost's F1 car from 1983 at World Series by Renault events.

Racing record

Complete European F5000 Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap.)

YearEntrantChassisEngine123456789101112131415161718Pos.Pts
1974 Tony Kitchiner McLaren M19A Chevrolet 5.0 V8 BRH MAL SIL OUL BRH ZOL THR
Ret
ZAN MUG MNZ MAL MON THR BRH OUL SNE MAL BRH NC0

Complete European Formula Two Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine12345678910111213Pos.Pts
1974 Ecurie Elf Alpine A367 BMW BAR HOC PAU SAL HOC MUG KAR PER HOC VAL
Ret
NC0
1976 Automobiles Martini Martini Mk 16 Renault HOC
2
THR
7
2nd52
Martini Mk 19 VAL
Ret
SAL
4
PAU
1
HOC
5
ROU
10
MUG
2
PER
1
EST
1
NOG
Ret
HOC
3
1977 Equipe Renault Elf Martini Mk 22 Renault SIL
1
THR
Ret
HOC
2
NÜR
5
VAL
Ret
PAU
1
MUG
16
ROU
Ret
NOG
1
PER
2
MIS
Ret
EST
2
DON
6
1st52

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine12345678910111213141516WDC Pts
1978 Automobiles Martini Martini MK23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 ARG BRA RSA
DNQ
USW MON
DNPQ
BEL
9
ESP SWE FRA
14
GBR GER
DNPQ
AUT
9
NED
Ret
ITA NC0
Durex Team Surtees Surtees TS20 USA
9
CAN
Ret
1979 Equipe Renault Elf Renault RS01 Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6 t ARG
Ret
BRA
Ret
RSA
Ret
USW
DNS
ESP
9
BEL
Ret
8th17
Renault RS10 MON
Ret
FRA
3
GBR
2
GER
Ret
AUT
6
NED
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
Ret
USA
2
1980 Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE20 Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6 t ARG
Ret
BRA
1
RSA
1
USW
9
BEL
4
MON
Ret
FRA
5
GBR
NC
GER
Ret
AUT
9
NED
2
ITA
10
CAN
Ret
USA
7
6th29
1981 Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE20B Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6 t USW
8
BRA
Ret
ARG
5
SMR
8
BEL
DNQ
9th11
Renault RE30 MON
Ret
ESP
9
FRA
4
GBR
9
GER
13
AUT
2
NED
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
Ret
CPL
Ret
1982 Equipe Renault Elf Renault RE30B Renault-Gordini EF1 1.5 V6 t RSA
3
BRA
Ret
USW
Ret
SMR
Ret
BEL
Ret
MON
Ret
DET
10
CAN
Ret
NED
Ret
GBR
Ret
FRA
1
GER
2
AUT
Ret
SUI
16
ITA
1
CPL
Ret
6th28
1983 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 126C2B Ferrari 021 1.5 V6 t BRA
10
USW
3
FRA
7
SMR
3
MON
Ret
BEL
Ret
DET
Ret
CAN
1
GBR
5
3rd49
Ferrari 126C3 GER
1
AUT
2
NED
1
ITA
2
EUR
9
RSA
Ret
1984 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 126C4 Ferrari 031 1.5 V6 t BRA
Ret
RSA
Ret
BEL
3
SMR
2
FRA
4
MON
3
CAN
5
DET
Ret
DAL
2
GBR
6
GER
6
AUT
7
NED
11
ITA
Ret
EUR
5
POR
9
6th27
1985 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 156/85 Ferrari 031 1.5 V6 t BRA
4
POR SMR MON CAN DET FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA BEL EUR RSA AUS 17th3
1986 Equipe Ligier Ligier JS27 Renault EF4B 1.5 V6 t BRA
4
ESP
Ret
SMR
Ret
MON
5
BEL
Ret
CAN
6
DET
Ret
FRA
5
GBR
4
GER
4
HUN
Ret
AUT
10
ITA
Ret
POR
7
MEX
15
AUS
7
10th14
1987 Ligier Loto Ligier JS29B Megatron M12/13 1.5 L4 t BRA SMR
DNS
BEL
6
MON
11
DET
10
19th1
Ligier JS29C FRA
Ret
GBR
Ret
GER
Ret
HUN
Ret
AUT
10
ITA
10
POR
Ret
ESP
Ret
MEX
Ret
JPN
Ret
AUS
Ret
1988 Ligier Loto Ligier JS31 Judd CV 3.5 V8 BRA
Ret
SMR
DNQ
MON
Ret
MEX
Ret
CAN
Ret
DET
Ret
FRA
DNQ
GBR
18
GER
17
HUN
Ret
BEL
Ret
ITA
13
POR
10
ESP
Ret
JPN
17
AUS
Ret
NC0
1989 Ligier Loto Ligier JS33 Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 BRA
DNQ
SMR
DNQ
MON
12
MEX
14
USA
DNQ
CAN
5
FRA
Ret
GBR
DNQ
GER
11
HUN
DNQ
BEL
Ret
ITA
9
POR
13
ESP
DNQ
JPN
DNQ
AUS
Ret
23rd2

Complete Formula One Non-Championship results

(key) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine1
1978 Automobiles Martini Martini MK23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 INT
DNS
1983 Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 126C2B Ferrari 021 1.5 V6 t ROC
Ret

24 Hours of Le Mans results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1977 Flag of France.svg J. Haran de Chaunac Flag of France.svg Didier Pironi
Flag of France.svg Guy Fréquelin
Renault Alpine A442 S
+2.0
0DNFDNF
1994 Flag of France.svg Rent-a-Car Racing Team Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Justin Bell
Flag of France.svg Bertrand Balas
Dodge Viper RT/10GT127312th3rd
1995 Flag of the United States.svg Euromotorsport Racing Inc. Flag of Italy.svg Massimo Sigala
Flag of the United States.svg Jay Cochran
Ferrari 333 SP WSC7DNFDNF
Source: [8]

Related Research Articles

Alain Prost French racing driver

Alain Marie Pascal ProstOBE is a retired French racing driver and a four-time Formula One Drivers' Champion. From 1987 until 2001 Prost held the record for most Grand Prix victories and is considered as one of the greatest F1 drivers ever. Michael Schumacher surpassed Prost's total of 51 victories at the 2001 Belgian Grand Prix. In 1999, Prost received the World Sports Awards of the Century in the motor sport category.

Eddie Cheever American racecar driver

Edward McKay Cheever Jr. is an American former racing driver who raced for almost 30 years in Formula One, sports cars, CART, and the Indy Racing League. Cheever participated in 143 Formula One World Championship races and started 132, more than any other American, driving for nine different teams from 1978 through 1989. In 1997, he formed his own IRL team and won the 1998 Indianapolis 500 as both owner and driver. The team now competes in sports cars.

1981 German Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1981

The 1981 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Hockenheimring on 2 August 1981. It was the tenth race of the 1981 FIA Formula One World Championship.

1981 Austrian Grand Prix

The 1981 Austrian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Österreichring on 16 August 1981. It was the eleventh race of the 1981 Formula One World Championship.

1982 Caesars Palace Grand Prix racing

The 1982 Caesars Palace Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on September 25, 1982 in Las Vegas, Nevada. It was the sixteenth and final race of the 1982 FIA Formula One World Championship, and the second and last F1 race to be held in Las Vegas.

1983 French Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1983

The 1983 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Paul Ricard on April 17, 1983.

1985 San Marino Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1985

The 1985 San Marino Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Imola on 5 May 1985. It was the third race of the 1985 Formula One World Championship. The 60-lap race was won by Elio de Angelis, driving a Lotus-Renault, after McLaren driver Alain Prost had been disqualified for being underweight. Thierry Boutsen was second in an Arrows-BMW, with Patrick Tambay third in a factory Renault.

1988 Australian Grand Prix 468th Formula 1 Championship Grand Prix

The 1988 Australian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Adelaide Street Circuit, Adelaide, on 13 November 1988. It was the 53rd Australian Grand Prix to be held since the original 100 Miles Road Race was held in 1928, and it was the fourth race to be held on the streets of Adelaide as part of the Formula One world championship. It was the sixteenth and final race of the 1988 Formula One season, as well as the last race for which turbocharged engines would be eligible until 2014.

1989 Spanish Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1989

The 1989 Spanish Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Jerez on 1 October 1989. The race, contested over 73 laps, was the fourteenth race of the 1989 Formula One season and was won from pole position by Ayrton Senna, driving a McLaren-Honda. Gerhard Berger was second in a Ferrari, while Senna's teammate and Drivers' Championship rival Alain Prost was third.

1986 Formula One World Championship sports season

The 1986 FIA Formula One World Championship was the 40th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1986 Formula One World Championship for Drivers and the 1986 Formula One World Championship for Manufacturers, both of which commenced on 23 March and ended on 26 October after sixteen races. The Drivers' Championship was won by Alain Prost, and the Manufacturers' Championship was won by Williams. Prost was the first driver to win back-to-back Drivers' Championships since Jack Brabham in 1959 and 1960.

The 1985 FIA Formula One World Championship was the 39th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1985 Formula One World Championship for Drivers and the 1985 Formula One World Championship for Manufacturers, both of which commenced on 7 April and ended on 3 November after sixteen races. The World Championship for Drivers was won by Alain Prost, and the World Championship for Manufacturers was won by McLaren for the second consecutive year.

The 1984 FIA Formula One World Championship was the 38th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1984 Formula One World Championship for Drivers and the 1984 Formula One World Championship for Manufacturers, which were contested concurrently over a sixteen-race series that commenced on 25 March and ended on 21 October.

The 1983 FIA Formula One World Championship was the 37th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1983 Formula One World Championship for Drivers and the 1983 Formula One World Championship for Constructors, which were contested concurrently over a fifteen-race series that commenced on 13 March and ended on 15 October. Nelson Piquet won the Drivers' Championship, his second Formula One title and the first to be won by a driver using a turbocharged engine, while Ferrari won the Constructors' Championship.

1982 Formula One World Championship sports season

The 1982 FIA Formula One World Championship was the 36th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1982 Formula One World Championship for Drivers and the 1982 Formula One World Championship for Constructors, which were contested concurrently over a sixteen-race series that began on 23 January and ended on 25 September. The Drivers' Championship was won by Keke Rosberg and the Constructors' Championship by Ferrari.

The 1981 FIA Formula One World Championship was the 35th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1981 Formula One World Championship for Drivers and the 1981 Formula One World Championship for Constructors, which were contested concurrently over a fifteen-race series that commenced on 15 March and ended on 17 October. Formula One cars also contested the 1981 South African Grand Prix, although this was technically a Formula Libre race and was not part of the Formula One World Championship.

Stefan Johansson Swedish racecar driver

Stefan Nils Edwin Johansson is a Swedish racing driver who drove in Formula One for both Ferrari and McLaren, among other teams. Since leaving Formula One he has won the 1997 24 Hours of Le Mans and raced in a number of categories, including CART, various kinds of Sports car racing and Grand Prix Masters.

Renault RE30

The Renault RE30 was a Formula One car designed by Bernard Dudot and Michel Tétu for use by the Renault team in the 1981 Formula One season. An updated version, the RE30B, was used in the 1982 season, and a further update, the RE30C, at the start of the 1983 season.

The Ligier JS27 was the Formula One car used by French team Ligier team competed in the 1986 season.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 32. ISBN   0851127029.
  2. 1 2 Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 201. ISBN   0851127029.
  3. 1 2 Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 33. ISBN   0851127029.
  4. "Engine Alfa Romeo". www.statsf1.com. Retrieved 27 May 2017.
  5. "Engine Megatron". www.statsf1.com. Retrieved 27 May 2017.
  6. Wendler, Andrew (20 September 2013). "10 Things You Need to Know About James Hunt Before Seeing Rush". Car and Driver . Hearst Communications, Inc. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  7. Murray Walker & James Hunt on René Arnoux at 1989 Monaco GP on YouTube
  8. "All Results of René Arnoux". racingsportscars.com. Retrieved September 21, 2017.

Sources

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Jean-Pierre Jabouille
European Formula Two
Champion

1977
Succeeded by
Bruno Giacomelli