Reticius

Last updated
Saint Reticius
Bishop
Died~334 AD
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Feast May 15

Saint Reticius (or Rheticus, Rheticius) (French: Saint Rhétice) (early 4th century) was a bishop of Autun, the first one known to history, according to the Catholic Encyclopedia . He was a Gallo-Roman, and an ecclesiastical writer, and served as bishop of this see from around 310 to 334 AD. [1]

<i>Catholic Encyclopedia</i> English-language encyclopedia

The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".

He traveled on behalf of Emperor Constantine the Great in 313 to the Synod of Rome and in 314 to the Synod of Arles, in order to bring about a resolution to the dispute with the Donatists. [2]

Constantine the Great Roman emperor

Constantine the Great, also known as Constantine I, was a Roman Emperor who ruled between 306 and 337 AD. Born in Naissus, in Dacia Ripensis, city now known as Niš, he was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman Army officer. His mother was Empress Helena. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian and Galerius. In 305, Constantius was raised to the rank of Augustus, senior western emperor, and Constantine was recalled west to campaign under his father in Britannia (Britain). Constantine was acclaimed as emperor by the army at Eboracum after his father's death in 306 AD. He emerged victorious in a series of civil wars against Emperors Maxentius and Licinius to become sole ruler of both west and east by 324 AD.

Gregory of Tours praised Reticius in his writings. [2] Saint Jerome mentions Reticius in his De Viris Illustribus :

Gregory of Tours Gallo-Roman historian and Bishop of Tours

Gregory of Tours was a Gallo-Roman historian and Bishop of Tours, which made him a leading prelate of the area that had been previously referred to as Gaul by the Romans. He was born Georgius Florentius and later added the name Gregorius in honour of his maternal great-grandfather. He is the primary contemporary source for Merovingian history. His most notable work was his Decem Libri Historiarum, better known as the Historia Francorum, a title that later chroniclers gave to it, but he is also known for his accounts of the miracles of saints, especially four books of the miracles of Martin of Tours. St. Martin's tomb was a major pilgrimage destination in the 6th century, and St. Gregory's writings had the practical effect of promoting this highly organized devotion.

<i>De Viris Illustribus</i> (Jerome) collection of biographies by Jerome

De Viris Illustribus is a collection of short biographies of 135 authors, written in Latin, by the 4th-century Latin Church Father Jerome. He completed this work at Bethlehem in 392-3 AD. The work consists of a prologue plus 135 chapters, each consisting of a brief biography. Jerome himself is the subject of the final chapter. A Greek version of the book, possibly by the same Sophronius who is the subject of Chapter 134, also survives. Many biographies take as their subject figures important in Christian Church history and pay especial attention to their careers as writers. It "was written as an apologetic work to prove that the Church had produced learned men." The book was dedicated to Flavius Lucius Dexter, who served as high chamberlain to Theodosius I and as praetorian prefect to Honorius. Dexter was the son of Saint Pacianus, who is eulogized in the work.

RETICIUS, bishop of Autun, among the Aedui, had a great reputation in Gaul in the reign of
Constantine. I have read his commentaries On the Song of Songs and another great volume
Against Novatian but besides these, I have found no works of his. [3]

Reticius was succeeded by Cassian of Autun, also venerated as a saint.

Saint Cassian of Autun was a 4th-century bishop of Autun. He may have been an Egyptian by birth. He traveled to Autun and was a follower of Saint Reticius, bishop of Autun.

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References

  1. "Autun". Catholic Encyclopedia. 2009. Retrieved April 23, 2009.
  2. 1 2 ? (n.d.). "Reticius von Autun". Ökumenisches Heiligenlexikon. Retrieved April 23, 2009.
  3. Saint Jerome (n.d.). "Lives of Illustrious Men. Chapter LXXXII". Christian Classics Ethereal Library. Retrieved April 23, 2009.
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