Richard Bollard

Last updated

Auckland Weekly News 30 October 1919
Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19191030-39-20 R. F. Bollard MP.jpg
Auckland Weekly News 30 October 1919
Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19191030-39-20
New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1911 1914 18th Raglan Reform
1914 1919 19th Raglan Reform
1919 1922 20th Raglan Reform
1922 1925 21st Raglan Reform
1925 1927 22nd Raglan Reform

Richard Francis Bollard (23 May 1863 – 25 August 1927) was a farmer [1] and New Zealand politician of the Reform Party. He represented the Raglan electorate from 1911 to 1927, when he died. [2] As Minister of Internal Affairs, he was a cabinet minister from 1923 [3] to 1927 in the Reform Government. [4]

He was reported making speeches [5] and opening events and buildings; in 1912 farewelling the local publican, [6] in 1914 opening Matangi post office, [7] in 1915 opening the Winter Show of the Raglan A. and P. Association [8] and opening Whatawhata post office. [9] As Minister for Internal Affairs he opened Te Uku post office [10] and Te Hutewai School in 1924, [11] Raglan footbridge in 1926 [12] and in 1924 was reported as making three calls one day and two the next, in between catching the train from Auckland to Wellington. [13]

Bollard was the eldest son of John Bollard, also a Member of Parliament. [14]

Notes

  1. "Mr R. Bollard". Evening Post. LXXXII (144). 15 December 1911. p. 3.
  2. Wilson 1985, p. 184.
  3. "Political Primings". NZ Truth. 23 June 1923. p. 5. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  4. Wilson 1985, pp. 78f.
  5. "A Minister' Honoured". New Zealand Herald. 15 May 1926. p. 12. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  6. "Raglan". Waikato Argus. 26 March 1912. p. 4. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  7. "Matangi Post Office". Waikato Argus. 17 June 1914. p. 2. Retrieved 7 January 2016.
  8. Waikato Times, Volume 84, Issue 13181, 22 May 1915, Page 4
  9. "WHATAWHATA POST OFFICE". Papers Past. Waikato Times, Volume 84, Issue 13188,, Page 4. 31 May 1915.
  10. Te Uku 1975 R T Vernon page 70
  11. Raglan Settlers Centennial Booklet 1940
  12. "Tin Tactics". Auckland Star. 15 May 1926. p. 14. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  13. "Ministers' Movements". New Zealand Herald. 25 February 1924. p. 8. Retrieved 8 January 2016.
  14. "Death of Mr. John Bollard". The Evening Post . Press Association. 24 March 1912. Retrieved 8 March 2013.

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References

New Zealand Parliament
Vacant
Constituency abolished in 1870
Title last held by
James Farmer
Member of Parliament for Raglan
1911–1927
Succeeded by