Richard Fraser (actor)

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Richard Fraser
Richard Fraser in The Picture of Dorian Gray trailer.jpg
Fraser in a trailer for The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945)
Born
Richard Mackie Simpson

(1913-03-15)15 March 1913
Edinburgh, Scotland
Died19 January 1972(1972-01-19) (aged 58)
London, England
Other namesRichard Mackie
Education University of Cambridge
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
Occupation Actor
Years active1941–1952
Spouse(s)
Louise Christine Sheldon
(m. 1938;div. 1944)

(m. 1952;div. 1970)

Edna Martin
(m. 1971;died 1972)

Richard Fraser (born Richard Mackie Simpson; 15 March 1913 – 19 January 1972) was a Scottish film, television, and stage actor. He is perhaps best known for his role in the 1945 film The Picture of Dorian Gray .

Contents

Early life

After graduating from Sedbergh School as Richard Mackie Simpson, Richard's mother divorced and his name was shortened to Richard Mackie. After attending Cambridge University, Richard Mackie studied acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Having spent time as a London stage actor, Richard emigrated to the US and in New York married Louise Christine Sheldon, the couple then moved to Hollywood before the Second World War. Discovering that there was already a Richard Mackie acting in the US he adopted the stage name Richard Fraser. He then signed a contract with 20th Century Fox and appeared in numerous films. [1]

Career

His American film career reached its peak with his performance as James Vane, the vengeful brother of Sibyl Vane in the film The Picture of Dorian Gray . Richard retired from acting in 1949, returning to Britain in 1961 with his then-wife, US actress Ann Gillis, spending his most of his last decade working for the BBC in export sales. [1]

Selected filmography

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