Richard Rogers (MP)

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Richard Rogers (c. 1611–1643) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 to 1642. He supported the Royalist side in the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Rogers was the son of Sir John Rogers of Kilve. His father died in 1613 and his mother was known after her second marriage as Margaret Banastre. He came of age in 1632. [1]

In April 1640, Rogers was elected Member of Parliament for Dorset in the Short Parliament. [2] After being re-elected for Dorset to the Long Parliament later in the year he was disabled on 12 September 1642 for sending forces into Sherborne Castle. [3]

Dorset was a county constituency covering Dorset in southern England, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs), traditionally known as knights of the shire, to the House of Commons of England from 1290 until 1707, to the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800, and to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom until 1832.

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

Long Parliament English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660

The Long Parliament was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660. It followed the fiasco of the Short Parliament which had convened for only three weeks during the spring of 1640, and which in turn had followed an 11-year parliamentary absence. In September 1640, King Charles I issued writs summoning a parliament to convene on 3 November 1640. He intended it to pass financial bills, a step made necessary by the costs of the Bishops' Wars in Scotland. The Long Parliament received its name from the fact that, by Act of Parliament, it stipulated it could be dissolved only with agreement of the members; and, those members did not agree to its dissolution until 16 March 1660, after the English Civil War and near the close of the Interregnum.

Rogers died in 1643 aged 32.

Rogers married Anne Cheek daughter of Sir Thomas Cheek of Pirgo. After his death his wife married Robert Rich, 3rd Earl of Warwick. His two daughters, Elizabeth and Rogersa, were left in the guardianship of his mother and of Lancelot Lake, who was married to Anne's sister. Elizabeth married firstly Charles Cavendish, Viscount Mansfield and secondly Charles Stewart, 6th Duke of Lennox. Rogersa married Sir Henry Belasyse. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 'Parishes: Kilve', A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 5 (1985), pp. 96-103. Date accessed: 18 April 2011
  2. Willis, Browne (1750). Notitia Parliamentaria, Part II: A Series or Lists of the Representatives in the several Parliaments held from the Reformation 1541, to the Restoration 1660 ... London. pp.  onepage&q&f&#61, false 229–239.
  3. The parliamentary or constitutional history of England;: being a faithful account of all the most remarkable transactions in Parliament, from the earliest times. Collected from the journals of both Houses, the records, ..., Volume 9
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1629
Member of Parliament for Dorset
1640-1642
With: Lord Digby 1640
John Browne 1641–1642
Succeeded by
John Browne
Sir Thomas Trenchard