Richard Vaughan (bishop)

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Richard Vaughan
Bishop of London
Portrait of Ricardvs Vavghanvs (4672123).jpg
De Passe engraving, 1620
Church Church of England
Diocese London
Installed1604
Term ended1607
Predecessor Richard Bancroft
Successor Thomas Ravis
Other post(s) Bishop of Bangor (1595–1597)
Bishop of Chester (1597–1604)
Orders
Ordinationc.1578
Consecrationc.1595
Personal details
Bornc.1550
Died(1607-03-30)30 March 1607
London
Buried St Paul's Cathedral
Nationality Welsh
ParentsThomas ap Robert Fychan
Spouse
Jane Bower
(m. 1581)
Alma mater St John's College, Cambridge
Ordination history of
Richard Vaughan
History
Episcopal consecration
Principal consecrator John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury
Co-consecrators Richard Fletcher, Bishop of London
John Young, Bishop of Rochester
Date25 January 1596
Placethe chapel, Lambeth Palace
Source(s): [1] [2]
Arms: Sable a chevron between three fleur-de-lis Argent. Richard Vaughan Escutcheon.png
Arms: Sable a chevron between three fleur-de-lis Argent.

Richard Vaughan (c.1550 30 March 1607) was a Welsh bishop of the Church of England.

Contents

Life

His father was Thomas ap Robert Fychan of Llŷn, Caernarfonshire. He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, where he graduated BA in 1574, MA in 1577, and DD in 1589. [4] He became chaplain to John Aylmer, Bishop of London, who is said to have been a relative. [5]

Vaughan assisted William Morgan in his translation of the Bible into Welsh, published in 1588.

He was rector of Chipping Ongar from 1578 to 1580, and of Little Canfield in 1580; Archdeacon of Middlesex in 1588; [6] rector of Great Dunmow and Moreton in 1592, and of Stanford Rivers in 1594. [7] [8] [9] He became Bishop of Bangor in 1595, Bishop of Chester in 1597, was Bishop of London from 1604 to 1607. [10]

His views were Calvinist, and he signed and is presumed to have had input into the Lambeth Articles of 1595. [11] He licensed in 1606 the translation of the work Institutiones Theologicae of the Reformed theologian Guillaume Du Buc (Gulielmus Bucanus) of Lausanne, carried out by Robert Hill. [12] [13] As Bishop of London he was generally sympathetic to moderate Puritan clergy; but he did take action in suspending Stephen Egerton. [14]

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References

  1. Cassan, Stephen Hyde. The Lives of the Bishops of Winchester: From Birinus, the First Bishop of the West Saxons, to the Present Time; Vol. II. p. 60 Accessed 11 September 2014
  2. Cassan, Stephen Hyde. The Lives of the Bishops of Winchester: From Birinus, the First Bishop of the West Saxons, to the Present Time; Vol. II. p. 64 Accessed 11 September 2014
  3. "The Armorial Bearings of the Bishops of Chester". Cheshire Heraldry Society. Retrieved 9 February 2021.
  4. "Vaughan, Richard (VHN569R)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  5. https://biography.wales/article/s-VAUG-RIC-1550?query=Richard+Vaughan&field=name Welsh Biography Online
  6. Horn, Joyce M. (1969), Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1541–1857, vol. 1, pp. 10–12
  7. "Chipping Ongar: Church - British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  8. "Moreton: Church - British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  9. "Stanford Rivers: Church - British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  10. Concise Dictionary of National Biography
  11. "The Lambeth Articles (1595)". www.cprf.co.uk. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  12. Nicholas Tyacke, Aspects of English Protestantism, C. 1530-1700 (2001), p. 164.
  13. s:Hill, Robert (d.1623) (DNB00)
  14. Francis J. Bremer, Tom Webster, Puritans and Puritanism in Europe and America: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia (2006), p. 87.

Attribution

Wikisource-logo.svg  Pollard, Albert Frederick (1899). "Vaughan, Richard (1550?-1607)". In Lee, Sidney (ed.). Dictionary of National Biography . Vol. 58. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

Church of England titles
Preceded by Bishop of Bangor
1595–1597
Succeeded by
Bishop of Chester
1597–1604
Succeeded by
Preceded by Bishop of London
1604–1607
Succeeded by