Richard Webb (settler)

Last updated
Richard Webb
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk
In office
May 1656 October 1656
Preceded by Matthew Canfield
Succeeded by Matthew Canfield
Personal details
BornMay 5, 1580 [1]
Warwickshire, England [1]
DiedJuly 1665 [2]
Norwalk, Connecticut Colony [2]
Resting place East Norwalk Historical Cemetery, East Norwalk, Connecticut
Spouse(s)Grace Wilson (m. May 1610), Elizabeth Gregory [1] [2]
ChildrenRichard Webb, Jr.
Residence Cambridge, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Hartford, Connecticut Colony
Norwalk, Connecticut Colony [2]
Occupationsurveyor [2]

Richard Webb (May 5, 1580 – July 1665) was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk in the session of May 1656.

Settler person who has migrated to an area and established permanent residence there

A settler is a person who has migrated to an area and established a permanent residence there, often to colonize the area. Settlers are generally from a sedentary culture, as opposed to nomads who share and rotate their settlements with little or no concept of individual land ownership. Settlements are often built on land already claimed or owned by another group. Many times settlers are backed by governments or large countries. They also sometimes leave in search of religious freedom.

Hartford, Connecticut Capital of Connecticut

Hartford is the capital city of Connecticut. It was the seat of Hartford County until Connecticut disbanded county government in 1960. The city is nicknamed the "Insurance Capital of the World", as it hosts many insurance company headquarters and is the region's major industry. It is the core city in the Greater Hartford area of Connecticut. Census estimates since the 2010 United States Census have indicated that Hartford is the fourth-largest city in Connecticut, behind the coastal cities of Bridgeport, New Haven, and Stamford.

Norwalk, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwalk is a U.S. city located in southwestern Connecticut, in southern Fairfield County, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. Norwalk lies within both the New York metropolitan area as well as the Bridgeport metropolitan area.

He came to America from England in 1626, and originally settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He went to Hartford in 1636, with the congregation of Thomas Hooker. His home was on the west aide of Main Street, near the present corner of Church Street. In Hartford he served as a grand-juror in 1643, as a townsman in 1649, and as a surveyor of highways in 1650. [2]

Cambridge, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Cambridge is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and part of the Boston metropolitan area.

Thomas Hooker Puritan minister

Thomas Hooker was a prominent Puritan colonial leader, who founded the Colony of Connecticut after dissenting with Puritan leaders in Massachusetts. He was known as an outstanding speaker and an advocate of universal Christian suffrage.

He was one of the signers of the agreement for planting Norwalk, June 19, 1650. [2] He moved there soon after. [2]

He is listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founders of Hartford in the Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford, and he is also listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founders of Norwalk in the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery.

History of Hartford, Connecticut

The History of Hartford, Connecticut has occupied a central place in Connecticut's history from the state's origins to the present, as well as the greater history of the United States of America.

First Church of Christ and the Ancient Burying Ground church building in Connecticut, United States of America

The First Church of Christ and the Ancient Burying Ground is a historic church and cemetery at 60 Gold Street in Hartford, Connecticut. It is the oldest church congregation in Hartford, founded in 1636 by Thomas Hooker. The present building, the congregation's fourth, was built in 1807, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The adjacent cemetery, formally set apart in 1640, was the city's sole cemetery until 1803.

History of Norwalk, Connecticut

The history of Norwalk, Connecticut ranges from pre-contact cultures and Native Americans to the 21st century.

Webb's paternal grandmother was Margaret Arden, sister of Mary Arden, the mother of playwright William Shakespeare.

Some researchers cite 1629 as the year that a Richard Webb (b. 1580) and his son Richard (b. 1610) arrived in Massachusetts. In all likelihood, it was either the younger Richard that followed the Reverend Hooker in the 1636 settlement of Hartford, Conn. or the Richard Webb in the company of an Elizabeth Webb who arrived in the 1630 Winthrop Fleet. The elder Richard may have died in 1646.

Related Research Articles

Connecticut Colony English, from 1707, British, possession in North America between 1636 and 1776

The Connecticut Colony or Colony of Connecticut, originally known as the Connecticut River Colony or simply the River Colony, was an English colony in North America that became the state of Connecticut. It was organized on March 3, 1636 as a settlement for a Puritan congregation, and the English permanently gained control of the region in 1637 after struggles with the Dutch. The colony was later the scene of a bloody war between the colonists and Pequot Indians known as the Pequot War. Connecticut Colony played a significant role in the establishment of self-government in the New World with its refusal to surrender local authority to the Dominion of New England, an event known as the Charter Oak incident which occurred at Jeremy Adams' inn and tavern.

Richard Risley was an early Puritan settler in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and one of the founders of Hartford, Connecticut. Risley sailed from England on July 15, 1633, in the ship Griffen with Thomas Hooker, William Stone, John Cotton, and John Haynes. They arrived in Boston on September 4, 1633.

William Parker (1618–1686) was an early Puritan settler in the Connecticut Colony and one of the founders of Hartford. He arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the summer of 1635 after sailing from London on May 21, 1635 aboard the ship Mathew. He settled in Newtowne, the community that is now Cambridge, and became one of the members of Thomas Hooker's congregation. He was one of the founders of Hartford, Connecticut.

Richard Olmsted was a founding settler of both Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served in the General Court of the Connecticut Colony in the sessions of May 1653, October 1654, May 1658, October 1660, May 1662, May and October 1663, May and October 1664, October 1665, May and October 1666, May 1667, May and October 1668, May 1669, May 1671, and May 1679.

Matthew Canfield was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut and Newark, New Jersey. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony representing Norwalk in the sessions of May 1654, May 1655, May 1656, May 1657, May 1658, May 1659, May 1660, May 1661, May and October 1662, October 1663, May and October 1664, May and October 1665, and May and October 1666.

Matthew Marvin Sr. was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the May 1654 session. He served as a magistrate in 1659.

Samuel Hale was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of 1656, 1657 and 1660.

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Nathaniel Richards (1604–1681) was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk in October 1658.

John Bowton was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1671, October 1673, May 1674, May 1675, October 1676, May and October 1677, May 1678, October 1679, May 1680, May 1681, May and October 1682. May 1683, and May and October 1685.

Stephen Beckwith was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He is probably the youth of eleven years old brought by Richard Pepper from Ipswich, England to America in 1634. He was at Hartford in 1649, and moved to Norwalk prior to 1655. He sold his farm to Richard Homes in March 1663. He was still living in Norwalk as late as 1687.

Thomas Hales was a founding settler of Hartford, and Norwalk, Connecticut. He was the son of Thomas Hale, born 1590 in Hertfordshire, England, and Joan Kirby Hale, born 1590, died 1640.

Thomas Hanford was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was the first minister in Norwalk, and continued in charge of the settlement's church for forty-one years, until his death in 1693. In addition to his spiritual leadership, he also served as the civic leader and school teacher of the settlement.

Richard Holmes was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut.

Matthew Marvin Jr. was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of May 1694, and May and October 1697.

Ralph Keeler was a founding settler of both Hartford, and Norwalk, Connecticut, United States.

Jonathan Marsh (1621–1672) was a founding settler of the New Haven Colony, and of Norwalk, Connecticut. He came to Norwalk from New Haven sometime prior to March 1656. He was the settlement's miller.

John Ruscoe was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut.

Thomas Seamer was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk in the May 1690 session.

References

Preceded by
Matthew Canfield
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

May 1656 – October 1656
Succeeded by
Matthew Canfield