Road Users' Code

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Road Users' Code is a road user guide in Hong Kong. It is published by the Transport Department.

Contents

There is not a single law governing the rules of the road like other jurisdictions. Licensing and road maintenance are under the purview of the Transport Department and the Highways Department respectively. The first edition was published in June 1987, and has been updated from time to time. The latest edition was published in June 2020.

There are several motoring laws in Hong Kong:

Previous editions

See also

Related Research Articles

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Traffic Road users travelling by foot or vehicle

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Jaywalking

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Yield sign traffic sign

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