Roanoke County, Virginia

Last updated
Roanoke County
Roanoke County courthouse.JPG
Roanoke County Courthouse
Roanoke seal.png
Seal
Map of Virginia highlighting Roanoke County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Virginia in United States.svg
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°16′N80°05′W / 37.27°N 80.08°W / 37.27; -80.08
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
FoundedMarch 30, 1838
Named for Roanoke River
Seat Salem
Largest town Vinton
Area
  Total251 sq mi (650 km2)
  Land251 sq mi (650 km2)
  Water0.7 sq mi (2 km2)  0.3%
Population
 (2010)
  Total92,376
  Estimate 
(2018) [1]
94,073
  Density370/sq mi (140/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts 6th, 9th
Website www.roanokecountyva.gov
[2]

Roanoke County is a county located in the U.S. state of the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 92,376. [3] Its county seat is Salem. [4]

Contents

Roanoke County is part of the Roanoke, VA Metropolitan Statistical Area and located within the Roanoke Region of Virginia. [5]

The independent cities of Roanoke and Salem (incorporated as such in 1884 and 1968 respectively) are located within the boundaries of Roanoke County, but are not a part of the county. The town of Vinton is the only municipality within the county. While significant areas of the county are rural and mountainous, most residents live in the suburbs near Roanoke and Salem in the Roanoke Valley.

History

State historical marker for Roanoke County, Virginia Roanoke County Virginia state historical marker.JPG
State historical marker for Roanoke County, Virginia

The county was established by an act of the Virginia Legislature on March 30, 1838 from the southern part of Botetourt County. [2] It was named for the Roanoke River, which in turn was derived from a Native American term for money. [6] Additional territory was transferred to Roanoke County from Montgomery County in 1845. Salem was originally the county seat. [7] When Salem became an independent city, by agreement with the county the Roanoke County Courthouse remained in Salem and the two localities share a jail. However, the County Administrative Offices were moved to the Cave Spring District.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 251.3 square miles (650.9 km2), of which 250.6 square miles (649.1 km2) is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km2) (0.3%) is water. [8]

Districts

The county is governed by a Board of Supervisors with one representative elected from each of the five magisterial districts: Catawba, Cave Spring, Hollins, Vinton, and Windsor Hills. [9] Vinton is an incorporated town with an elected town council and town manager. [10]

Adjacent Counties and Cities

Nationally Protected Areas

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1840 5,499
1850 8,47754.2%
1860 8,048−5.1%
1870 9,35016.2%
1880 13,10540.2%
1890 30,101129.7%
1900 15,837−47.4%
1910 19,62323.9%
1920 22,39514.1%
1930 35,28957.6%
1940 42,89721.6%
1950 41,486−3.3%
1960 61,69348.7%
1970 67,3399.2%
1980 72,9458.3%
1990 79,3328.8%
2000 85,7788.1%
2010 92,3767.7%
Est. 201894,073 [1] 1.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [11]
1790-1960 [12] 1900-1990 [13]
1990-2000 [14] 2010-2013 [3]

As of the census [15] of 2000, there were 85,778 people, 34,686 households, and 24,696 families residing in the county. The population density was 342 people per square mile (132/km²). There were 36,121 housing units at an average density of 144 per square mile (56/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.63% White, 3.35% Black or African American, 0.12% Native American, 1.61% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. 1.04% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 34,686 households out of which 30.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.90% were married couples living together, 8.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.80% were non-families. 25.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.70% under the age of 18, 6.60% from 18 to 24, 27.50% from 25 to 44, 27.20% from 45 to 64, and 15.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 89.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $47,689, and the median income for a family was $56,450. Males had a median income of $39,126 versus $26,690 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,637. About 2.70% of families and 4.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.20% of those under age 18 and 4.90% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Roanoke is a strongly Republican county in Presidential elections: no Democrat has gained a plurality in the county since Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1944. However, the independent city of Roanoke itself is more Democratic than the county's average and has voted for Democrats in each presidential election since 1988.[ citation needed ]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [16]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 61.0%31,40833.4% 17,2005.6% 2,881
2012 61.8%31,62436.5% 18,7111.7% 882
2008 60.0%30,57138.9% 19,8121.2% 592
2004 65.1%30,59634.2% 16,0820.6% 295
2000 60.1%25,74037.7% 16,1412.2% 936
1996 52.5%20,70039.0% 15,3878.5% 3,334
1992 50.3%20,66735.8% 14,70413.9% 5,709
1988 62.6%22,01136.8% 12,9380.6% 208
1984 68.6%23,34831.0% 10,5690.4% 137
1980 55.8%17,18239.3% 12,1144.9% 1,518
1976 50.4%13,58748.7% 13,1200.9% 241
1972 77.3%19,92020.6% 5,3182.1% 540
1968 58.9%12,43918.5% 3,90222.6% 4,783
1964 54.8%10,71445.1% 8,8080.1% 14
1960 67.3%9,10932.4% 4,3840.3% 39
1956 69.8%7,50927.0% 2,8993.2% 345
1952 69.0%6,01730.8% 2,6890.2% 20
1948 53.5%3,98838.6% 2,8767.9% 591
1944 48.1% 3,14651.7%3,3800.2% 10
1940 39.1% 2,30260.1%3,5390.8% 47
1936 37.9% 2,10561.6%3,4220.6% 31
1932 39.9% 1,70458.8%2,5091.3% 55
1928 67.6%2,67532.4% 1,284
1924 36.8% 69557.0%1,0786.2% 117
1920 41.9% 95556.4%1,2861.8% 41
1916 34.2% 46063.2%8502.5% 34
1912 10.6% 10868.3%69621.1% 215

Education

There are five high schools located in Roanoke County:

Hollins University, a member of the Old Dominion Athletic Conference, is located in northern Roanoke County, near the Botetourt County border. Roanoke College, also a member of the Old Dominion Athletic Conference, is located in the independent city of Salem within the boundaries of Roanoke County; the former county courthouse on Main Street is now a college academic building.

Notable people

Notable sports figures from Roanoke County include Tiki Barber, Ronde Barber, and J. J. Redick, all of whom attended and graduated from Cave Spring High School in Southwest Roanoke County.

Communities

Town

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Many of these CDPs and unincorporated areas have mailing addresses in the cities of Roanoke and Salem.

See also

Related Research Articles

Montgomery County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Montgomery County is a county located in the Valley and Ridge area of the U.S. state of Virginia. As population in the area increased, Montgomery County was formed in 1777 from Fincastle County, which in turn had been taken from Botetourt County. As of the 2010 census, the population was 94,392. Its county seat is Christiansburg.

Salem, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Salem is an independent city in the U.S. commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 24,802. It is the county seat of Roanoke County, although the two are separate jurisdictions. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Salem with Roanoke County for statistical purposes.

Craig County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Craig County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,190. Its county seat is New Castle.

Covington, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Covington is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,961, making it the third-least populous city in Virginia. It is surrounded by Alleghany County, of which it is also the county seat. Located at the confluence of Jackson River and Dunlap Creek, Covington is one of three cities in the Roanoke Regional Partnership. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Covington with Alleghany county for statistical purposes.

Botetourt County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Botetourt County is a United States county that lies in the Roanoke Region of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Located in the mountainous portion of the state, the county is bordered by two major ranges, the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Appalachian Mountains.

Bedford County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Bedford County is a United States county located in the Piedmont region of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is the town of Bedford, which was an independent city from 1968 until rejoining the county in 2013.

Alleghany County, Virginia County in Virginia

Alleghany County is an American county located on the far western edge of Commonwealth of Virginia. It is bordered by the Allegheny Mountains, from which the county derives its name, and it is the northernmost part of the Roanoke Region. The county seat is Covington.

Glenvar Heights, Florida CDP in Florida, United States

Glenvar Heights is a census-designated place (CDP) and neighborhood in Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States. The population was 16,898 at the 2010 census. The zip codes serving Glenvar Heights are 33173, 33143, and 33155.

Blue Ridge, Virginia CDP in Virginia, United States

Blue Ridge is a census-designated place (CDP) in Botetourt County, Virginia, United States. The population was 3,084 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Buchanan, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Buchanan is a town in Botetourt County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,178 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was the western terminus of the James River and Kanawha Canal when construction on the canal ended.

Daleville, Virginia CDP in Virginia, United States

Daleville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Botetourt County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,557 as of the 2010 census, an increase of over 75% from the 2000 census, when the population was 1,454. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. One of the county's two high schools, Lord Botetourt, is located in Daleville.

Fincastle, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Fincastle is a town in Botetourt County, Virginia, United States. The population was 353 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Botetourt County.

Boones Mill, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Boones Mill is a town in Franklin County, Virginia, United States. The population was 239 at the 2010 census, down from 285 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Cave Spring, Virginia CDP in Virginia, United States

Cave Spring is a census-designated place (CDP) in Roanoke County, Virginia, United States. The population was 24,922 at the 2010 census. Cave Spring covers much of the area known locally as "Southwest County" which has the most affluent suburbs of Roanoke. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Vinton, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Vinton is a town in Roanoke County, Virginia, United States. The population was 8,098 at the 2010 census. Vinton is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Roanoke Region of Virginia.

Salem, West Virginia City in West Virginia, United States

Salem is a city in Harrison County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,586 at the 2010 census. It is located at the junction of U.S. Route 50 and West Virginia Route 23; the North Bend Rail Trail passes through the city. Salem University is located in Salem.

Hollins, Virginia CDP in Virginia, United States

Hollins is a census-designated place (CDP) in Botetourt and Roanoke counties in the U.S. state of Virginia. Hollins covers much of the area known locally as "North County". The population was 14,673 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. The area is also the home of Hollins University in addition to four properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the Black Horse Tavern-Bellvue Hotel and Office, Harshbarger House, the Hollins College Quadrangle, and Old Tombstone.

Roanoke metropolitan area human settlement in United States of America

The Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area is a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The Roanoke MSA is sometimes referred to as the Roanoke Valley, even though the Roanoke MSA occupies a larger area than the Roanoke Valley. It is geographically similar to the area known as the Roanoke Region of Virginia, but while the latter includes Alleghany County, the former does not. As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,309.

The Roanoke Valley in southwest Virginia is an area adjacent to and including the Roanoke River between the Blue Ridge Mountains to the east and the Appalachian Plateau to the west. The valley includes much of Roanoke County, as well as the two independent cities of Roanoke and Salem.

The Roanoke Region is the area of the Commonwealth of Virginia surrounding the city of Roanoke. Its usage may refer to the metropolitan statistical area or the Roanoke Valley, but it sometimes includes areas in the Allegheny Mountains and New River Valley which includes Alleghany county, Montgomery county, Covington, Clifton Forge, Iron Gate, Blacksburg, Christiansburg, and Radford. Rarely, it may include Bedford County and Floyd County.

References

  1. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Archived from the original on May 29, 2017. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  2. 1 2 Jack, Pp. 6-7
  3. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  4. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  5. "Home - Roanoke Regional Partnership". Roanoke Regional Partnership. Archived from the original on 2009-06-13.
  6. Jack, P. 8
  7. Jack, P. 43
  8. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Archived from the original on 2012-03-05. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. "Board of Supervisors". Roanoke County, Virginia. Archived from the original on December 6, 2010. Retrieved December 23, 2010.
  10. "Town Council". Town of Vinton. Archived from the original on January 3, 2011. Retrieved December 23, 2010.
  11. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  12. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  13. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 15, 2013. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  14. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  15. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  16. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on 2018-03-23.

Bibliography

Coordinates: 37°16′N80°05′W / 37.27°N 80.08°W / 37.27; -80.08