Robert Adair (actor)

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Robert Adair
Robert Adair actor.jpg
Born(1900-01-03)3 January 1900
San Francisco, California, U.S.
Died10 August 1954(1954-08-10) (aged 54)
London, England
Other namesRobert A'Dair
OccupationActor

Robert Adair (3 January 1900 – 10 August 1954) [1] was an American-born British actor. [2] He was born in San Francisco. [3] He was also known as Robert A'Dair, [1] the name by which he was billed in Journey's End (1930). [4]

Contents

Adair died of leukemia in London. [5]

Selected filmography

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References

  1. 1 2 Wollstein, Hans J. "Robert Adair". AllMovie. AllMovie. Archived from the original on 2 January 2020. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  2. McFarlane, Brian; Slide, Anthony (16 May 2016). The Encyclopedia of British Film: Fourth edition. Manchester University Press. ISBN   9781526111968 via Google Books.
  3. "Robert Adair".
  4. "'Journey's End' in Gala Bow Sunday". The San Francisco Examiner. California, San Francisco. 24 May 1930. p. 11. Retrieved 2 January 2020 via Newspapers.com.
  5. "Actor Robert Adair Dies of Leukemia". The Progress-Index. Virginia, Petersburg. Associated Press. 10 August 1954. p. 1. Retrieved 10 September 2018 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg

Sources