Robert Barnard

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Robert Barnard (23 November 1936 – 19 September 2013) was an English crime writer, critic and lecturer. [1] In addition to over 40 books published under his own name, he also published four books under the pseudonym Bernard Bastable.

Contents

Life and work

Robert Barnard was born on 23 November 1936 at Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex. He was educated at the Colchester Royal Grammar School and at Balliol College, Oxford.

His first crime novel, Death of an Old Goat, was published in 1974. The novel was written while he was a lecturer at University of Tromsø in Norway. He went on to write more than 40 other books and numerous short stories. As "Bernard Bastable", he published two standalone novels and two alternate history books, featuring Wolfgang Mozart – who had here survived to old age – as a detective.

Barnard was awarded the Cartier Diamond Dagger in 2003 by the Crime Writers Association for a lifetime of achievement. [2] He said that his favourite crime writer was Agatha Christie. In 1980 he published a critique of her work titled A Talent to Deceive: An Appreciation of Agatha Christie.

Barnard died on 19 September 2013. [2] [3] He and his wife Louise lived in Yorkshire.

Bibliography

Mystery novels

Charlie Peace novels

Perry Trethowan novels

Short story collections

Novels written as Bernard Bastable

Non-fiction

Notes

  1. Mike Ripley. "Robert Barnard obituary | Books". theguardian.com. Retrieved 2013-09-25.
  2. 1 2 "Robert Barnard, winner of the CWA Cartier Diamond Dagger 2003". Archived from the original on 2013-09-27. Retrieved 2013-09-22.
  3. "Robert Barnard R.I.P." Retrieved 2013-09-22.

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