Robert Burnell

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  1. During this period, a clerk meant a man who was a member of the secular clergy. [5]
  2. Exactly what happened and when in August 1270 is confused, and as this is the time when Burnell was put forward for Canterbury as well as when he planned to accompany Edward on crusade, the exact reasons why this change happened thus remain a matter of guesswork. The historian Richard Huscroft explored the issues in an article in 2001. [11]
  3. Latin for "by what warrant?"
  4. The Privy Seal at this time was held by the controller of the Wardrobe, who was Philip Willoughby from the accession until 18 October 1274 then Thomas Bek, (later Bishop St David's) until 20 November 1280, then William Louth (later Bishop of Ely) until 12 May 1290, then Walter Langton, acting controller from 12 May 1290, and then appointed to office on 20 November 1290 until 1295. [30]

Citations

  1. Harding England in the Thirteenth Century p. 159
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Harding "Burnell, Robert" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  3. Greenway "Prebends: Holme" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 6: York
  4. 1 2 Chrimes Introduction p. 134
  5. Coredon Dictionary pp. 75–76
  6. Coredon Dictionary p. 66
  7. Prestwich Edward I p. 23
  8. 1 2 Studd "Chancellors of the Lord Edward" Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research p. 183
  9. Greenway "Archdeacons: York" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 6: York
  10. Prestwich Edward I p. 73
  11. Huscroft "Should I Stay or Should I Go?" Nottingham Medieval Studies pp. 97–109
  12. Prestwich Plantagenet England p. 123
  13. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 85
  14. 1 2 Huscroft "Robert Burnell and the Government of England" Thirteenth Century England VIII p. 59
  15. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 233
  16. 1 2 Harding England in the Thirteenth Century p. 243
  17. Jordan "English Holy Men" Cistercian Studies Quarterly p. 74
  18. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 276
  19. Greenway "Winchester: Bishops" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 2: Monastic Cathedrals (Northern and Southern Provinces)
  20. Prestwich Edward I p. 138
  21. 1 2 Prestwich Edward I p. 233
  22. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 228
  23. 1 2 3 Prestwich Plantagenet England pp. 124–126
  24. Prestwich Three Edwards pp. 20–21
  25. Clanchy From Memory to Written Record p. 3
  26. 1 2 3 Chrimes Introduction p. 140
  27. Saul "Government" Companion to Medieval England pp. 115–118
  28. Coredon Dictionary p. 143
  29. Coredon Dictionary p. 227
  30. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 79
  31. 1 2 Lyon Constitutional and Legal History pp. 362–363
  32. 1 2 Chrimes Introduction p. 145
  33. Coredon Dictionary p. 148
  34. Prestwich Edward I p. 323
  35. Prestwich Edward I p. 311
  36. Prestwich Edward I p. 365
  37. Tyerman England and the Crusades p. 236
  38. Greenway "Bishops" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 7: Bath and Wells
  39. Moorman Church Life p. 169
  40. Prestwich Edward I p. 136
  41. Powell and Wallis House of Lords p. 208
  42. Moorman Church Life p. 167
  43. Platt Castle p. 83
  44. Pettifer English Castles p. 209
  45. "Bishop's Palace Chapel Wells, UK" Palace Trust
  46. Huscroft "Robert Burnell and the Government of England" Thirteenth Century England VIII p. 70
  47. Huscroft "Should I Stay or Should I Go?" Nottingham Medieval Studies pp. 108–109
  48. Huscroft "Should I Stay or Should I Go?" Nottingham Medieval Studies p. 97

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References

  • "Bishop's Palace Chapel, Wells UK". The Bishop's Palace and Gardens. The Palace Trust. Archived from the original on 1 January 2008. Retrieved 5 February 2008.
  • Chrimes, S. B. (1966). An Introduction to the Administrative History of Mediaeval England (Third ed.). Oxford, UK: Basil Blackwell. OCLC   270094959.
  • Clanchy, M. T. (1993). From Memory to Written Record: England 1066–1307 (Second ed.). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing. ISBN   978-0-631-16857-7.
  • Coredon, Christopher (2007). A Dictionary of Medieval Terms & Phrases (Reprint ed.). Woodbridge, UK: D. S. Brewer. ISBN   978-1-84384-023-7.
  • Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  • Greenway, Diana E. (2001). "Bishops". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300. Vol. 7: Bath and Wells. Institute of Historical Research. pp. 1–6. Archived from the original on 19 September 2013. Retrieved 5 February 2008.
  • Greenway, Diana E. (1999). "Archdeacons: York". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300. Vol. 6: York. Institute of Historical Research. pp. 31–36. Archived from the original on 5 August 2011. Retrieved 5 February 2008.
  • Greenway, Diana E. (1999). "Prebends: Holme". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300. Vol. 6: York. Institute of Historical Research. pp. 78–81. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 5 February 2008.
  • Greenway, Diana E. (1971). "Winchester: Bishops". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300. Vol. 2: Monastic Cathedrals (Northern and Southern Provinces). Institute of Historical Research. pp. 85–87. Archived from the original on 14 February 2012. Retrieved 5 February 2008.
  • Harding, Alan (2004). "Burnell, Robert (d. 1292)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (October 2007 ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4055 . Retrieved 5 February 2008.(subscription or UK public library membership required)
  • Harding, Alan (1993). England in the Thirteenth Century. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0-521-31612-X.
  • Huscroft, Richard (1997). "Robert Burnell and the Government of England". In Prestwich, Michael; Britnell, Richard; Frame, Robin (eds.). Thirteenth Century England VIII. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press. pp. 59–70. ISBN   978-0-85115-719-1.
  • Huscroft, Richard (2001). "Should I Stay or Should I Go? Robert Burnell, the Lord Edward's Crusade and the Canterbury vacancy of 1270–3". Nottingham Medieval Studies. XLV: 97–109. doi:10.1484/J.NMS.3.322. S2CID   159668366.
  • Jordan, William Chester (2008). "The English Holy Men of Pontigny". Cistercian Studies Quarterly. 43 (1): 63–75.
  • Lyon, Bryce Dale (1980). A Constitutional and Legal History of Medieval England (Second ed.). New York: Norton. ISBN   0-393-95132-4.
  • Moorman, John R. H. (1955). Church Life in England in the Thirteenth Century (Revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. OCLC   213820968.
  • Pettifer, Adrian (1995). English Castles: A Guide by Counties. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press. ISBN   0-85115-782-3.
  • Platt, Colin (1996). The Castle in Medieval England & Wales (Reprint ed.). New York: Barnes & Noble. ISBN   0-7607-0054-0.
  • Powell, J. Enoch; Wallis, Keith (1968). The House of Lords in the Middle Ages: A History of the English House of Lords to 1540. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. OCLC   463626.
  • Prestwich, Michael (1997). Edward I. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ISBN   0-300-07157-4.
  • Prestwich, Michael (2005). Plantagenet England 1225–1360. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. ISBN   978-0-19-922687-0.
  • Prestwich, Michael (1990). The Three Edwards: War and State in England 1272–1377. New York: Routledge. ISBN   0-415-05133-9.
  • Saul, Nigel (2000). "Government". A Companion to Medieval England 1066–1485. Stroud, UK: Tempus. ISBN   0-7524-2969-8.
  • Studd, J. R (November 1978). "Chancellors of the Lord Edward". Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research. 51 (124): 181–183. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2281.1978.tb01878.x. S2CID   159533122.
  • Tyerman, Christopher (1988). England and the Crusades, 1095–1588. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. ISBN   0-226-82013-0.

Further reading

Robert Burnell
Bishop of Bath and Wells
Province Canterbury
Elected23 January 1275
Term ended25 October 1292
Predecessor William of Bitton II
Successor William of March
Other post(s) Lord Chancellor, Archbishop-elect of Canterbury, Bishop-elect of Winchester
Orders
Consecration7 April 1275
by  Archbishop Robert Kilwardby, O.P.
Personal details
Born c. 1239
Died25 October 1292 (age c. 53)
Berwick-upon-Tweed
Buried Wells Cathedral
ParentsRoger Burnell (probably)
Lord Chancellor
In office
1274–1292
Political offices
Preceded by Lord Chancellor
1274–1292
Succeeded by
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by Bishop of Bath and Wells
1275–1292
Succeeded by
Preceded byas consecrated archbishop) Archbishop-elect of Canterbury
1278–1279
Succeeded byas consecrated archbishop
Preceded byas consecrated bishop Bishop-elect of Winchester
1280
Succeeded by