Robert Carson (writer)

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Robert Carson
BornOctober 6, 1909
Clayton, Washington
DiedJanuary 19, 1983 (aged 73)
Los Angeles, California

Robert Carson (October 6, 1909, Clayton, Washington – January 19, 1983, Los Angeles, California) was an American film and television screenwriter, novelist, and short story writer, who won an Academy Award in 1938 for his screenplay of A Star Is Born. He was married to Mary Jane Irving, a former child actress. [1]

Contents

Film screenwriting credits

Television screenwriting credits

Bibliography

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