Robert K. Massie

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Robert K. Massie
BornRobert Kinloch Massie III
(1929-01-05) January 5, 1929 (age 90)
Lexington, Kentucky, United States
Occupation Historian, biographer
Nationality American
Alma mater Yale University
University of Oxford

Robert Kinloch Massie III (born January 5, 1929) is an American historian and biographer. He has devoted much of his career to studying the House of Romanov, Russia's royal family from 1613 to 1917.

Historian person who studies and writes about the past

A historian is a person who studies and writes about the past, and is regarded as an authority on it. Historians are concerned with the continuous, methodical narrative and research of past events as relating to the human race; as well as the study of all history in time. If the individual is concerned with events preceding written history, the individual is a historian of prehistory. Some historians are recognized by publications or training and experience. "Historian" became a professional occupation in the late nineteenth century as research universities were emerging in Germany and elsewhere.

House of Romanov imperial dynasty of Russia

The House of Romanov was the reigning royal house of Russia from 1613 to 1917.

Russian Empire Former country, 1721–1917

The Russian Empire, also known as Imperial Russia or simply Russia, was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.

Contents

Biography

Massie was born in Lexington, Kentucky. He spent much of his youth in Nashville, Tennessee and studied United States and European history at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut and Oxford University in Great Britain (United Kingdom), respectively, on a Rhodes Scholarship. Massie worked as a journalist for Newsweek news magazine from 1959 to 1962 before taking a position at the old Saturday Evening Post .

Lexington, Kentucky Consolidated city-county in Kentucky, United States

Lexington, consolidated with Fayette County and often denoted as Lexington-Fayette, is the second-largest city in Kentucky and the 60th-largest city in the United States. By land area, Lexington is the 28th largest city in the United States. Known as the "Horse Capital of the World," it is the heart of the state's Bluegrass region. It has a nonpartisan mayor-council form of government, with 12 council districts and three members elected at large, with the highest vote-getter designated vice mayor. In the 2017 U.S. Census Estimate, the city's population was 321,959, anchoring a metropolitan area of 512,650 people and a combined statistical area of 856,849 people.

Kentucky State of the United States of America

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it, (because in Kentucky's first constitution, the name state was used) Kentucky is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth. Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States.

Tennessee State of the United States of America

Tennessee is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Tennessee is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the west, and Missouri to the northwest. The Appalachian Mountains dominate the eastern part of the state, and the Mississippi River forms the state's western border. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, with a 2017 population of 667,560. Tennessee's second largest city is Memphis, which had a population of 652,236 in 2017.

In 1967, before he and his family moved to France, Massie wrote and published his breakthrough book, Nicholas and Alexandra , an authoritative biography of Tsar/Czar Nicholas II (1868–1918, reigned 1894–1917) and Alexandra of Hesse (1872–1918), the last Emperor and Empress of Russia. Massie's interest in the Russian Imperial Family of Romanov was triggered by the birth of his son, Robert Kinloch Massie IV, who was born with hemophilia—a hereditary disease that also afflicted Nicholas's son and heir to the imperial throne, the Tsarevich (crown prince) Alexis Nikolaevich. In 1971 the book was the basis for an Academy Award-winning biographical feature film with the same title, which starred Michael Jayston alongside Janet Suzman. 28 years later in 1995, in his book The Romanovs: The Final Chapter, Massie updated the Nicholas and Alexandra historical biography with much newly discovered information following the opening of some Russian and Soviet archives after 73 years and the end of the Cold War with the opening of the Berlin Wall, the fall of communism in 1989 and subsequent dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1990–1991. Their bodies and those of some of their children were later exhumed from unmarked hidden forest graves, identified from modern DNA evidence and given a State and Church funeral by the new Russian Federation and interred in the restored Russian Orthodox cathedral in renamed St. Petersburg in 1998.

France Republic with mainland in Europe and numerous oversea territories

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.3 million. France, a sovereign state, is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

Nicholas and Alexandra: An Intimate Account of the Last of the Romanovs and the Fall of Imperial Russia is a 1967 biography of the last royal family of Russia by historian Robert K. Massie.

Bob Massie (politician) American politician

Robert Kinloch "Bob" Massie IV is an American activist and author who works on issues of global leadership and corporate accountability, social justice, and climate change. He has created or led several organizations, including Ceres, the Global Reporting Initiative, the Investor Network on Climate Risk, and the New Economy Coalition. His early activism centered on opposition to South Africa's apartheid regime, writing the about the relationship between the US and South Africa in the apartheid era.

In 1975 Robert Massie and his then-wife Suzanne Massie chronicled their experiences as the parents of a child with hemophilia and the significant differences between the American and French health care systems in their jointly-written book, Journey.

Suzanne Massie is an American author who played an important role in the relations between Ronald Reagan and the Soviet Union in the final years of the Cold War.

Health care Prevention of disease and promotion of wellbeing

Health care or healthcare is the maintenance or improvement of health via the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, illness, injury, and other physical and mental impairments in human beings. Health care is delivered by health professionals in allied health fields. Physicians and physician associates are a part of these health professionals. Dentistry, midwifery, nursing, medicine, optometry, audiology, pharmacy, psychology, occupational therapy, physical therapy and other health professions are all part of health care. It includes work done in providing primary care, secondary care, and tertiary care, as well as in public health.

Massie later won the 1981 Pulitzer Prize for Biography for Peter the Great: His Life and World . This biographical book inspired a 1986 NBC television network miniseries, Peter the Great , that won three Emmy Awards and starred Maximilian Schell, Laurence Olivier and Vanessa Redgrave.

Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography

The Pulitzer Prize for Biography is one of the seven American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Letters, Drama, and Music. It has been presented since 1917 for a distinguished biography, autobiography or memoir by an American author or co-authors, published during the preceding calendar year. Thus it is one of the original Pulitzers, for the program was inaugurated in 1917 with seven prizes, four of which were awarded that year.

Peter the Great: His Life and World is a 1980 work written by Robert K. Massie. The book won the 1981 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography. The book chronicles the life of Peter I of Russia, and is divided into five parts: "Old Muscovy", "The Great Embassy", "The Great Northern War", "On the European Stage", and "The New Russia".

An Emmy Award, or simply Emmy, is an American award that recognizes excellence in the television industry, and is the equivalent of an Academy Award, the Tony Award, and the Grammy Award.

Since then, Massie has written a number of books, and his most recent biographical book, Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman was published in 2011 about the Tsarina Catherine the Great (1729–1796, reigned 1762–1796).

Catherine the Great Empress of Russia

Catherine II, also known as Catherine the Great, born Princess Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst, was Empress of Russia from 1762 until 1796, the country's longest-ruling female leader. She came to power following a coup d'état when her husband, Peter III, was overthrown. Under her reign, Russia was revitalized; it grew larger and stronger and was recognized as one of the great powers of Europe.

From 1987 to 1991, Massie was President of the Authors Guild, and he currently serves as an ex officio council member. [1] While President of the Guild, he famously called on authors to boycott any store that refused to carry Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses because of threats from the Islamic /Muslim world. [2]

Awards and honors

Bibliography

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References

  1. http://www.authorsguild.org/?p=181
  2. Smith, William E. (1989-03-06). "Terrorism The New Satans". TIME. Retrieved 2011-06-27.
  3. Carolyn Kellogg (June 25, 2012). "First-ever Carnegie Awards in Literature go to Enright, Massie". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved June 25, 2012.