Robert Lord (screenwriter)

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Robert Lord
Born(1900-05-01)May 1, 1900
DiedApril 5, 1976(1976-04-05) (aged 75)
OccupationScreenwriter, film producer
Years active1927–1947

Robert Lord (May 1, 1900 April 5, 1976) was an American screenwriter and film producer. He wrote for 71 films between 1925 and 1940. He won an Academy Award in 1933 in the category Best Writing, Original Story for the film One Way Passage . [1] He was nominated in the same category in 1938 for the film Black Legion . [2] He was born in Chicago, Illinois and died in Los Angeles from a heart attack.

Contents

Partial filmography

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References

  1. "The 6th Academy Awards (1934) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved February 4, 2012.
  2. "The 10th Academy Awards (1938) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved August 9, 2011.