Robert Tichborne

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  1. His name was spelt Robert Titchbourn in the Proclamation for apprehending the late King's Judges (4 June 1660) and as Robert Titchborne in House of Lords Journal Volume 11 (7 February 1662)
  2. David Plant, Robert Tichborne, Regicide, c.1610–82, the British Civil Wars and Commonwealth website
  3. Lee, Sidney (1903), Dictionary of National Biography Index and Epitome, p. 1300 (also main entry lvi 377)
  4. 1 2 Firth 1898 , p. 377 gives the quotation, but does not cite his source
  5. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Dillon, List of the Officers of the London Trained Bands, 1890, p. 8.
  6. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Report on the Duke of Portland's MSS. i. 95.
  7. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Rushworth, vii. 761; Clarke Papers, i. 396.
  8. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Rushworth, i. 396, 404, ii. 256, 258, 262.
  9. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Ludlow, Memoirs, i. 212; The humble petition of the Commons of the City of London ... together with Col. Tichborne's Speech, 1648, 4to.
  10. 1 2 3 4 Firth 1898, p. 377.
  11. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Commons' Journals, vii. 30.
  12. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Commons' Journals. vii. 132.
  13. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Commons' Journals.
  14. "Early English Books Online - EEBO". eebo.chadwyck.com. Retrieved 31 January 2020.
  15. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: London's Triumph, or the solemn reception of Robert Tichborne, Lord Mayor, 29 October 1656, 4to.
  16. Firth 1898 , p. 378 Cites: Harl. Miscell. iii. 484.
  17. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Ludlow Memoirs, ii. 131, 149, 173, ed. 1894.
  18. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1659–60, p. 574.
  19. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: Ludlow, ii. 294; and Kennet, Register, p. 181.
  20. Firth 1898 , p. 377 Cites: (The two City Jugglers, Tichborn and Ireton: a dialogue, 1660, 4to; The pretended saint and the profane libertine well met in prison: or a dialogue between Robert Tichborne and Henry Marten , 1660.
  21. Firth 1898 , p. 378 gives the quotation, but does not cite his source
  22. Firth 1898 , p. 378 Cites: (Commons' Journals. viii. 73; Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1660–1,78, 344, 558.
  23. 1 2 Firth 1898, p. 378.
  24. Firth 1898 , p. 378 Cites: Hist. MSS. Comm. 5th Rep. p. 169; cf. Thurloe, iii. 381.
  25. Firth 1898 , p. 378 Cites: Lords' Journals, xi. 372, 380.
  26. Firth 1898 , p. 378 Cites: Papers of the Duke of Leeds, p. 4; Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1663-4, pp. 289, 505, 510, 592.
  27. Firth 1898 , p. 378 Cites: Luttrell, Diary, i. 204.

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References

Attribution
Robert Tichborne
Sheriff of the City of London
In office
1651–1651
Servingwith Richard Chiverton