Robert Zuppke

Last updated
Robert Zuppke
Robert Zuppke.jpg
Zuppke at Illinois, c. 1920
Biographical details
Born(1879-07-02)July 2, 1879
Berlin, Germany
DiedDecember 22, 1957(1957-12-22) (aged 78)
Champaign, Illinois
Playing career
Football
c. 1900 Milwaukee Normal
Basketball
1903–1905 Wisconsin
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1906–1909Hackley Manual Training (MI)
1910–1912 Oak Park and River Forest HS (IL)
1913–1941 Illinois
Head coaching record
Overall131–81–12 (college)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
4 National (1914, 1919, 1923, 1927)
7 Western / Big Ten (1914–1915, 1918–1919, 1923, 1927–1928)
Awards
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award (1948)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1951 (profile)

Robert Carl Zuppke (July 2, 1879 – December 22, 1957) was an American football coach. He served as the head coach at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign from 1913 until 1941, compiling a career college football record of 131–81–12. Inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951, Zuppke coached his teams to national titles in 1914, 1919, 1923, and 1927. Zuppke's teams also won seven Big Ten Conference championships. While at the University of Illinois, Zuppke was a member of the Alpha-Gamma Chapter of Kappa Sigma. Among the players Zuppke coached at Illinois was Red Grange, the era's most celebrated college football player. The field at the University of Illinois's Memorial Stadium is named Zuppke Field in his honor. Zuppke is credited for many football inventions and traditions, including the huddle and the flea flicker. In 1914, he reintroduced the I formation. [1]

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign public research university in Urbana and Champaign, Illinois, United States

The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign is a public research university in Illinois and the flagship institution of the University of Illinois System. Founded in 1867 as a land-grant institution, its campus is located in the twin cities of Champaign and Urbana.

College football collegiate rules version of American/Canadian football, played by student-athletes of American/Canadian colleges and universities

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Contents

Prior to coaching at the University of Illinois, Zuppke coached at Muskegon High School in Muskegon, Michigan and Oak Park and River Forest High School in Oak Park, Illinois, where he tutored future Pro Football Hall of Famer George Trafton, and Olympic decathlete Harry Goelitz. [2] Zuppke led the team to state championships in 1911 and 1912. He had several coaching influences. He used some plays developed by Pop Warner. [3]

Muskegon High School

Muskegon High School is a public high school located in Muskegon, Michigan, and was the first high school in Muskegon County, Michigan.

Muskegon, Michigan City in Michigan, United States

Muskegon is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, and is the largest populated city on the eastern shores of Lake Michigan. At the 2010 census the city population was 38,401. The city is the county seat of Muskegon County. It is located at the southwest corner of Muskegon Township, but is administratively autonomous.

Oak Park and River Forest High School

Oak Park and River Forest High School, or OPRF, is a public four-year high school located in Oak Park, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. It is the only school of Oak Park and River Forest District 200.

Zuppke also was a writer and a fine art painter. From 1930 to 1948, Zuppke wrote the syndicated newspaper strip Ned Brant, drawn by Walt Depew. [4] During the 1930s, Zuppke also wrote syndicated sports-related columns. [5] As a painter, Zuppke was known for his rugged Western landscapes.

Zuppkeisms

Zuppke was given to philosophical remarks, known as "Zuppkeisms." The seven best-known are as follows:

  1. Never let hope elude you; that is life's biggest failure
  2. The greatest athlete is one who can carry a nimble brain to the place of action
  3. Moral courage is the result of respect from fellow men
  4. A good back should keep his feet at all times and never lose his head
  5. Men do their best if they know they are being observed
  6. Alumni are loyal if a coach wins all his games
  7. Advice to freshmen: don't drink the liniment [6]

Artist

Zuppke was also a painter who worked mainly on creating evocative, naturalistic landscapes depicting the American Southwest. Zuppke saw no conflict between his interest in painting and football strategy as he believed, "Art and football are very much alike". [7] His work was displayed in several shows, including a one-man show at the Palmer House in Chicago in 1937. Zuppke was a member of the No-Jury Society of Artists in Chicago and an acquaintance of Ernest Hemingway. Images of Zuppke alongside some of his paintings can be found in the University of Illinois Archives. [8]

Ernest Hemingway American author and journalist

Ernest Miller Hemingway was an American journalist, novelist, and short-story writer. His economical and understated style—which he termed the iceberg theory—had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his adventurous lifestyle and his public image brought him admiration from later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short-story collections, and two non-fiction works. Three of his novels, four short story collections, and three non-fiction works were published posthumously. Many of his works are considered classics of American literature.

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Illinois Fighting Illini (Western Conference / Big Ten Conference)(1913–1941)
1913 Illinois 4–2–12–2–15th
1914 Illinois 7–06–01st
1915 Illinois 5–0–23–0–2T–1st
1916 Illinois 3–3–12–2–1T–4th
1917 Illinois 5–2–12–2–1T–5th
1918 Illinois 5–24–0T–1st
1919 Illinois 6–16–11st
1920 Illinois 5–24–24th
1921 Illinois 3–41–4T–8th
1922 Illinois 2–52–46th
1923 Illinois 8–05–0T–1st
1924 Illinois 6–1–13–1–1T–2nd
1925 Illinois 5–32–2T–4th
1926 Illinois 6–22–2T–6th
1927 Illinois 7–0–15–01st
1928 Illinois 7–14–11st
1929 Illinois 6–1–13–1–12nd
1930 Illinois 3–51–48th
1931 Illinois 2–60–610th
1932 Illinois 5–42–47th
1933 Illinois 5–33–2T–5th
1934 Illinois 7–14–13rd
1935 Illinois 3–51–4T–9th
1936 Illinois 4–3–12–2–16th
1937 Illinois 3–3–22–38th
1938 Illinois 3–52–37th
1939 Illinois 3–4–13–36th
1940 Illinois 1–70–59th
1941 Illinois 2–60–59th
Illinois:131–81–1276–66–8
Total:131–81–12
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

See also

Related Research Articles

Bob Blackman (American football) American football player and coach

Bob Blackman was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Denver (1953–1954), Dartmouth College (1955–1970), the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (1971–1976), and Cornell University (1977–1982), compiling a career college football record of 168–112–7. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1987.

Christian Steinmetz college basketball player

Christian Steinmetz was an American basketball player. He played forward for the University of Wisconsin from 1903 to 1905. He was college basketball's leading scorer in the game's first 25 years from 1895 to 1920. He became known as the "Father of Wisconsin Basketball" and was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1961.

Ralph Jones American football and basketball coach

Ralph Robert "Curley" Jones was an American high school and college football and basketball coach. He also served as the head coach for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL) from 1930 to 1932, leading them to the 1932 NFL championship.

Bunny Oakes American football player and coach, college athletics administrator

Bernard F. "Bunny" Oakes was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Montana (1931–1934), the University of Colorado at Boulder (1935–1939), the University of Wyoming (1941–1946), and Grinnell College (1947–1948), compiling a career college football record of 43–69–4.

The Illinois Fighting Illini football program represents the University of Illinois in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level. Illinois has five national championships and 15 Big Ten championships.

Bart Macomber American football player

Franklin Bart Macomber was an American football player. He played halfback and quarterback for the University of Illinois from 1914 to 1916 and helped the school to its first national football championship and consecutive undefeated seasons in 1914 and 1915. He later played professional football for the Canton Bulldogs and Youngstown Patricians. He was also the coach and owner of the Oakland Oaks in the Pacific Coast professional football league founded in 1926. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1972.

Ernest Bearg American football and basketball coach

Elmer Ernest Bearg was an American football and basketball coach. He served as the head football coach at Washburn University from 1918 to 1919 and again from 1929 to 1935 and the University of Nebraska–Lincoln from 1925 to 1928, compiling a career college football record of 69–40–7. Bearg also spent one year as Nebraska's men's basketball coach (1925–1926) and posted an 8–10 mark. Before coming to Nebraska, he also served as an assistant coach at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign under Robert Zuppke

Leonard J. Umnus American college sports coach

Leonard J. Umnus was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach.

Maynard Morrison (American football) Player of American football

Maynard Davis "Doc" Morrison was an All-American football fullback and center for the University of Michigan Wolverines from 1929 to 1931. Michigan football coach Harry Kipke ranked Morrison as the finest linebacker he ever saw. "No one ever got past him," Kipke said. In 1931, he was chosen by Grantland Rice and the NEA Service as a first-team All-American at center and helped lead Michigan to a Big Ten Conference championship.

The 1940 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1940 Big Ten Conference football season. Under third-year head coach Fritz Crisler, Michigan compiled a 7–1 record and finished the season ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. The team outscored opponents 196 to 34. The team's sole setback was a 7–6 loss on the road against a Minnesota team that finished the season No. 1 in the final AP Poll.

Harold Pogue was an American football player and businessman. He played quarterback and halfback for Robert Zuppke's University of Illinois football teams and was selected as a first-team All-American in 1914. He later served as a member of the University of Illinois' Board of Trustees for 17 years.

Milo Sukup American football player and coach

Milo Frederick Sukup was an American football player and coach. He played college football for the University of Michigan from 1938 to 1940, where he was the running guard and a key blocker for Heisman Trophy winner Tom Harmon. He sustained a head injury late in his senior year that ended his football career. He was the head football coach and athletic director at Union High School in Grand Rapids, Michigan from 1942 to 1971.

Robert "Bob" Reitsch was a college football player. A prominent center, he was the captain of the national champion 1927 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, chosen first-team All-American by some selectors. Reitsch was a native of Rockford.

1915 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1915 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1915 college football season. In their third season under head coach Robert Zuppke, the Illini compiled a 5–0–2 record and finished as co-champions of the Western Conference. Center John W. Watson was the team captain.

1918 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1918 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1918 Big Ten Conference football season. In their sixth season under head coach Robert Zuppke, the Illini compiled a 5–2 record and tied for the Big Ten Conference championship.

1928 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1928 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1928 college football season. In their 16th season under head coach Robert Zuppke, the Illini compiled a 7–1 record and finished in first place in the Big Ten Conference. Tackle Albert J. Nowack was the team captain.

1937 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1937 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1937 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 25th season under head coach Robert Zuppke, the Illini compiled a 3–3–2 record and finished in eighth place in the Big Ten Conference. Quarterback Jack Berner was selected as the team's most valuable player.

William W. Anderson was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Occidental College from 1932 to 1939. Anderson played college football at the University of Illinois from 1915 to 1916 under head coach Robert Zuppke. Anderson was born in Ohio, Illinois. He died on September 17, 1969, at the age of 77.

References

  1. https://books.google.com/books?id=OmwfnipKuogC&pg=PA83
  2. Brichford , p. 15
  3. Brichford , p. 27
  4. DePew bio, Lambiek's Comiclopedia. Accessed December 10, 2011.
  5. Brichford, Maynard. Bob Zuppke: the life and football legacy of the Illinois coach (McFarland, 2009).
  6. "Bob "The Little Dutchman" Zuppke". College Football Hall of Fame . Retrieved February 17, 2010.
  7. "Sport: Football Artist". Time Magazine. October 18, 1937.
  8. "Robert Zuppke and His Artwork". University of Illinois Archives. Retrieved December 10, 2011.

Books