Robin Irvine

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Robin Irvine (21 December 1901, in Stoke Newington, London, England – 28 April 1933, in Bermuda) was a British film actor. He was married to actress Ursula Jeans from 1931 until his death from pleurisy aged 31. [1]

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Filmography

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