Rocket Bar

Last updated
Rocket Bar
Sire Three Bars
GrandsirePercentage
DamGolden Rocket
DamsireCartago
Sex Stallion
Foaled1951
CountryUnited States
Colour Chestnut
Record36 starts: 16-6-5
AA speed rating
Earnings$22,904.00
Major wins
Phoenix Gold Cup Handicap (twice)
Awards
AQHA Race Register of Merit
Honours
American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame

Rocket Bar (1951–1970) was a registered Thoroughbred stallion that made his mark on the Quarter Horse racetracks and as a breeding stallion.

Thoroughbred Horse breed developed for racing

The Thoroughbred is a horse breed best known for its use in horse racing. Although the word thoroughbred is sometimes used to refer to any breed of purebred horse, it technically refers only to the Thoroughbred breed. Thoroughbreds are considered "hot-blooded" horses that are known for their agility, speed, and spirit.

Stallion male horse that has not been castrated

A stallion is a male horse that has not been gelded (castrated). Stallions follow the conformation and phenotype of their breed, but within that standard, the presence of hormones such as testosterone may give stallions a thicker, "cresty" neck, as well as a somewhat more muscular physique as compared to female horses, known as mares, and castrated males, called geldings.

Contents

Life

Rocket Bar was a registered Thoroughbred son of Three Bars that foaled in Arizona in 1951. [1] [2] He raced until 1958, when he was sold and started a career in the breeding shed. [1]

Arizona State in the United States

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

Racing career

On the Quarter Horse tracks, Rocket Bar started once and came in third. He reached an AA speed rating in that one start, earning him a Race Register of Merit with the American Quarter Horse Association (or AQHA). [3] On the Thoroughbred tracks, he started 35 times in six years. From those starts, he won 16 times, came in second 6 times and was third 4 times. He earned a total of $22,904.00 and won the 1956 and 1957 Phoenix Gold Cup Handicap. [4] ]

Speed index is a system of rating the performance of Quarter Horse racehorses. The American Quarter Horse Association has used two systems over the history of Quarter Horse racing to evaluate racing performances. The original system used a letter grade, starting at D, then C, B, A and the highest AA. Later AAA was tacked on the top, and later still AAAT was made the top speed. Eventually, this system became too cumbersome, and a new system was introduced: the Speed Index system, which used a number system, with 100 being roughly equivalent to the old AAAT. This change occurred in 1969.

American Quarter Horse Association American horse breed registry for Quarter Horses

The American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), based in Amarillo, Texas, is an international organization dedicated to the preservation, improvement and record-keeping of the American Quarter Horse. The association sanctions many competitive events and maintains the official registry. The organization also houses the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame and Museum and sponsors educational programs. The organization was founded in 1940 in Fort Worth, Texas and now has nearly 234,627 members, over 32,000 of which are international.

Breeding record

During Rocket Bar's breeding career, he sired AQHA Supreme Champions Fire Rocket, He Rocket, and Sugar Rocket along with other notable horses including Rocket Wrangler, Osage Rocket, Mr Tinky Bar, and Top Rockette. [5]

Winner of the All American Futurity, Rocket Wrangler (1968–1992) went on to sire Dash For Cash.

Death and honors

Rocket Bar died on October 23, 1970, after colic surgery. [1]

Colic form of pain

Colic is a form of pain that starts and stops abruptly. It occurs due to muscular contractions of a hollow tube in an attempt to relieve an obstruction by forcing content out. It may be accompanied by sweating and vomiting. Types include:

Rocket Bar was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame in 1992. [6]

The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame and Museum was created by the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), based in Amarillo, Texas. Ground breaking construction of the Hall of Fame Museum began in 1989.The distinction is earned by people and horses who have contributed to the growth of the American Quarter Horse and "have been outstanding over a period of years in a variety of categories". In 1982, Bob Denhardt and Ernest Browning were the first individuals to receive the honor of being inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame. In 1989, Wimpy P-1, King P-234, Leo and Three Bars were the first horses inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.

Pedigree

Ballot
Midway
Thirty-third
Percentage
Bulse
Gossip Avenue
Rosewood
Three Bars
Ultimus
Luke McLuke
Midge
Myrtle Dee
Patriot
Civil Maid
Civil Rule
Rocket Bar
=St. Amant
*Atwell
=Doro
Cartago
Heno
Polly H
Polly
Golden Rocket
Runnymede
Morvich
Hymir
Morshion
Non Pareil
Cushion
Hassock

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Simmons, et al. Legends 2 pp. 134–139
  2. All Breed Pedigree Pedigree of Rocket Bar
  3. Wagoner Quarter Horse Digest pp. 1017–1021
  4. Bloodstock Research & Statistical Bureau American Produce Records p. 3521
  5. Pitzer Most Influential Quarter Horse Sires pp . 104–105
  6. American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA). "Rocket Bar". AQHA Hall of Fame. American Quarter Horse Association. Retrieved September 2, 2017.

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References