Rodney (New Zealand electorate)

Last updated
Rodney electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election Rodney electorate, 2014.svg
Rodney electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Rodney is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives. The current MP for Rodney is Mark Mitchell of the National Party. [1] He has held this position since 2011.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

Mark Mitchell (politician) New Zealand politician

Mark Patrick Mitchell is a New Zealand politician and a member of the New Zealand House of Representatives. He is a member of the National Party.

Contents

Population centres

The 1941 New Zealand census had been postponed due to World War II, so the 1946 electoral redistribution had to take ten years of population growth and movements into account. The North Island gained a further two electorates from the South Island due to faster population growth. The abolition of the country quota through the Electoral Amendment Act, 1945 reduced the number and increased the size of rural electorates. None of the existing electorates remained unchanged, 27 electorates were abolished, 19 electorates were created for the first time, and eight former electorates were re-established, including Rodney. [2]

North Island More northern, and smaller, of the two main islands of New Zealand

The North Island, also officially named Te Ika-a-Māui, is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the larger but much less populous South Island by Cook Strait. The island's area is 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi), making it the world's 14th-largest island. It has a population of 3,749,200.

South Island southernmost and largest of the two main islands in New Zealand

The South Island, also officially named Te Waipounamu, is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand in surface area; the other being the smaller but more populous North Island. It is bordered to the north by Cook Strait, to the west by the Tasman Sea, and to the south and east by the Pacific Ocean. The South Island covers 150,437 square kilometres (58,084 sq mi), making it the world's 12th-largest island. It has a temperate climate.

The country quota was a part of the New Zealand electoral system from 1881 until 1945. Its effect was to make urban constituencies more populous than those in rural areas, thus making rural votes worth more in general elections.

The 1981 census had shown that the North Island had experienced further population growth, and three additional general seats were created through the 1983 electoral redistribution, bringing the total number of electorates to 95. [3] The South Island had, for the first time, experienced a population loss, but its number of general electorates was fixed at 25 since the 1967 electoral redistribution. [4] More of the South Island population was moving to Christchurch, and two electorates were abolished, while two electorates were recreated. In the North Island, six electorates were newly created, three electorates were recreated (including Rodney), and six electorates were abolished. [5]

Christchurch Metropolitan area in South Island, New Zealand

Christchurch is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand and the seat of the Canterbury Region. The Christchurch urban area lies on the South Island's east coast, just north of Banks Peninsula. It is home to 404,500 residents, making it New Zealand's third-most populous city behind Auckland and Wellington.

The 1987 electoral redistribution took the continued population growth in the North Island into account, and two additional general electorates were created, bringing the total number of electorates to 97. In the South Island, the shift of population to Christchurch had continued. [6] Overall, three electorates were newly created, three electorates were recreated, and four electorates were abolished (including Rodney). All of those electorates were in the North Island. Changes in the South Island were restricted to boundary changes. [7] These changes came into effect with the 1987 election. [8]

1987 New Zealand general election

The 1987 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 42nd sitting of the New Zealand Parliament. The governing New Zealand Labour Party, led by Prime Minister David Lange, was re-elected for a second term, although the Opposition National Party made gains. The election also saw the elimination of the Democratic Party from Parliament, leaving Labour and National as the only parties represented.

Rodney covers an area of the northern Auckland region from Warkworth in the north, south through the Hibiscus Coast to Auckland's northern urban fringe. High population growth in north and west Auckland has led to Rodney shrinking – Helensville and Kumeu were taken out in 1999, and the next major town to be removed was Wellsford after the 2006 census.

Auckland Metropolitan area in North Island, New Zealand

Auckland is a city in the North Island of New Zealand. Auckland is the largest urban area in the country, with an urban population of around 1,628,900. It is located in the Auckland Region—the area governed by Auckland Council—which includes outlying rural areas and the islands of the Hauraki Gulf, resulting in a total population of 1,695,900. A diverse and multicultural city, Auckland is home to the largest Polynesian population in the world. The Māori-language name for Auckland is Tāmaki or Tāmaki-makau-rau, meaning "Tāmaki with a hundred lovers", in reference to the desirability of its fertile land at the hub of waterways in all directions.

Warkworth, New Zealand Town in Auckland, New Zealand

Warkworth is a town on the Northland Peninsula in the upper North Island of New Zealand. It is in the northern part of the Auckland Region. It is located on State Highway 1, 64 km north of Auckland and 98 km south of Whangarei, and is at the head of Mahurangi Harbour.

Hibiscus Coast

The Hibiscus Coast is a stretch of the Hauraki Gulf coast located in New Zealand's Auckland Region. It contains the northernmost part of the Auckland metropolitan area.

History

Rodney was first created for the 1871 election and was represented by four MPs from 1871 to 1890: Harry Farnall 1871–1872 (resigned); John Sheehan 1872–1879 (elected for Thames in 1879); Seymour Thorne George 1879–1884 (retired); and William Pollock Moat 1884–1890 (retired).

1871 New Zealand general election New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1871 was held between 14 January and 23 February to elect 78 MPs across 72 electorates to the fifth session of the New Zealand Parliament. 41,527 electors were registered.

Harry Warner Farnall was a New Zealand politician, emigration agent and labour reformer. He was a Member of Parliament from Auckland.

John Sheehan (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

John Sheehan was a 19th-century New Zealand politician. He was the first New Zealand-born Member of Parliament elected by a general electorate and he was the first New Zealand-born person to hold cabinet rank.

Its first recreation was from the 1946 election to 1978, and was recreated for a single term six years later for the 1984 election.

Rodney was again recreated ahead of the change to mixed-member proportional (MMP) voting in 1996. Its original incarnation was coterminous with the district for which it is named – most of the old Albany seat minus its eponymous town, with a large section of Kaipara tacked onto the northern fringe. Both of these seats were held by National MPs - Lockwood Smith in Kaipara and then Deputy Prime Minister Don McKinnon in Albany. Smith won his party's nomination for what is a safe National seat and has held it until the 2011 election, when he stood as a list candidate only. In the 1996 election, Mike Lee came second standing as an Independent. [9]

Members of Parliament

Key

  Independent     National     Green     NZ First   

ElectionWinner
1871 election Harry Farnall
1872 by-election John Sheehan
1876 election
1879 election Seymour George
1881 election
1884 election William Moat
1887 election
(Electorate abolished 1890–1946)
1946 election Clifton Webb
1949 election
1951 election
1954 election Jack Scott
1957 election
1960 election
1963 election
1966 election
1969 election Peter Wilkinson
1972 election
1975 election
(Electorate abolished 1978–1984, see Albany)
1984 election Don McKinnon
(Electorate abolished 1987–1996, see Albany)
1996 election Lockwood Smith
1999 election
2002 election
2005 election
2008 election
2011 election Mark Mitchell
2014 election
2017 election

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Rodney electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
1999 election Sue Bradford
2002 election
Craig McNair
2011 election Tracey Martin
2014 election Tracey Martin
2017 election Marja Lubeck
Tracey Martin

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Rodney [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Mark Mitchell 28,14063.14+0.1427,01061.02-1.37
Labour Marja Lubeck 8,57919.25+8.2310,57123.35+11.05
NZ First Tracey Martin 4,3819.83-0.323,9558.73-0.34
Green Harrison Burnard2,5038.87-3.252,0848.50-3.90
Opportunities Brittany Owens9632.168051.78
ACT  3890.86+0.37
Conservative  1300.29-6.46
Legalise Cannabis  1160.26−0.05
Māori  1030.23-0.13
Outdoors  320.07
United Future  270.06−0.15
People's Party  200.04
Ban 1080  170.04-0.03
Internet  110.02-0.57 [lower-alpha 1]
Democrats  80.02-0.02
Mana  30.01-0.58 [lower-alpha 2]
Informal votes22070
Total Valid votes44,56645,281
Turnout 45,351
National holdMajority19,56143.89-7.44

2014 election

2014 general election: Rodney [11]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Mark Mitchell 24,51963.00+9.4624,05161.02−1.12
Labour Eric Bolt4,28911.02−2.654,84712.30−1.13
NZ First Tracey Martin 3,95110.15+6.253,5759.07+2.10
Green Malcolm McAll3,4548.87+1.753,3518.50+0.03
Conservative Anton Heyns2,2105.68−15.552,6616.75+0.37
ACT Beth Houlbrooke2440.63+0.091920.49−0.70
Internet Mana  2310.59+0.44 [lower-alpha 3]
Māori  1420.36+0.00
Legalise Cannabis  1230.31−0.08
United Future  810.21−0.19
Ban 1080  290.07+0.07
Democrats  150.04+0.01
Independent Coalition  120.03+0.03
Civilian  80.02+0.02
Focus  50.01+0.01
Informal votes25591
Total Valid votes38,92239,414
Turnout 39,41481.63+3.58
National holdMajority20,23051.33+19.02

2011 election

2011 general election: Rodney [12]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Mark Mitchell 20,25353.54-6.8723,96762.15+3.16
Conservative Colin Craig 8,03121.23+21.232,4596.38+6.38
Labour Christine Rose5,17013.67-5.135,17813.43-7.19
Green Teresa Moore2,6947.12-0.573,2658.47+3.29
NZ First Tracey Martin 1,4763.90-0.352,6886.97+2.44
ACT Beth Houlbrooke2040.54-4.154601.19-5.37
United Future  1540.40-0.36
Legalise Cannabis  1510.39+0.03
Māori  1400.36-0.12
Mana  580.15+0.15
Libertarianz  180.05+0.02
Democrats  130.03+0.01
Alliance  120.03-0.03
Informal votes615257
Total Valid votes37,82838,563
National holdMajority12,22232.31-9.31

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 49,407 [13]

2008 election

2008 general election: Rodney [14]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Lockwood Smith 22,69860.4122,44158.99
Labour Conor Roberts7,06318.807,84220.61
Green David Hay2,8907.691,9695.18
ACT Beryl Good1,7604.682,4966.56
NZ First Tracey Martin 1,5994.261,7224.53
Family Party Karl Adams7351.962260.59
Kiwi Simonne Dyer5811.553270.86
United Future Kathleen Deal2450.652880.76
Progressive  1970.52
Māori  1820.48
Bill and Ben  1500.39
Legalise Cannabis  1360.36
Alliance  240.06
Libertarianz  110.03
Democrats  90.02
Workers Party  80.02
Pacific  50.01
RAM  50.01
RONZ  40.01
Informal votes226107
Total Valid votes37,57138,042
National holdMajority15,63541.61+10.57

2005 election

2005 general election: Rodney [15]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
National Green check.svgY Lockwood Smith 20,65155.57+16.9919,79952.65
Labour Tony Dunlop9,11524.53-0.8510,46227.82
NZ First Craig McNair 3,4969.413,0898.08
Green Graham Evans1,9185.161,6314.34
United Future Peter Mountain9972.681,1623.09
ACT Christopher Brown4501.216781.80
Progressive Tony Sharrock3320.893190.85
Māori Adell Dick1660.451070.28
Direct Democracy Colin Punter360.1020.01
Destiny  2380.63
Legalise Cannabis  580.15
Christian Heritage  360.10
Alliance  180.05
Democrats  150.04
Family Rights  80.02
Libertarianz  70.02
99 MP  60.02
RONZ  60.02
One NZ  30.01
Informal votes353145
Total Valid votes37,16137,605
National holdMajority11,53631.04+16.84

1999 election

Refer to Candidates in the New Zealand general election 1999 by electorate#Rodney for a list of candidates.

Table footnotes

  1. 2017 Internet Party swing is relative to the votes for Internet-Mana in 2014; it shared a party list with Mana Party in the 2014 election
  2. 2017 Mana Party swing is relative to the votes for Internet-Mana in 2014; it shared a party list with the Internet Party in the 2014 election
  3. 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.

Notes

  1. New Zealand Parliament - Mark Mitchell MP
  2. McRobie 1989, pp. 91–96.
  3. McRobie 1989, pp. 123f.
  4. McRobie 1989, pp. 111, 123.
  5. McRobie 1989, pp. 119–124.
  6. McRobie 1989, pp. 127f.
  7. McRobie 1989, pp. 123–128.
  8. McRobie 1989, p. 127.
  9. "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place - Rodney" (PDF). Retrieved 6 July 2013.
  10. "Official Count Results -- Rodney (2017)". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  11. "Official Count Results -- Rodney (2014)". Electoral Commission. 10 October 2014. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  12. 2011 election results
  13. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  14. 2008 election results
  15. election result Rodney 2005

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