Roger Gibson

Last updated
Roger F. Gibson Jr.
Born(1944-02-21)February 21, 1944
St. Louis, Missouri, United States
DiedSeptember 30, 2015(2015-09-30) (aged 71)
Reston, Virginia, United States
NationalityAmerican
EducationNortheast Missouri State College, currently Truman State University (B.A., 1971).
University of Missouri (M.A., 1973, Ph.D., 1977).
Notable work
(1) The Philosophy of W. V. Quine: An Expository Essay. 1982. ISBN   978-0-8130-0707-6.
(2) Enlightened Empiricism: An Examination of W. V. Quine's Theory of Knowledge. 1988. ISBN   978-0-8130-0886-8.
Spouse(s)Sharon Gibson
Era 20th-century philosophy
Region Western philosophy
School Analytic philosophy
Institutions Washington University in St. Louis
Main interests
Epistemology; philosophy of language

Roger Fletcher Gibson Jr. (February 21, 1944 – September 30, 2015) was an American philosopher specializing in epistemology and the philosophy of language. He was best known as a leading exponent of the philosophy of W. V. Quine.

Willard Van Orman Quine American philosopher and logician

Willard Van Orman Quine was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition, recognized as "one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century." From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A 2009 poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993 for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning." In 1996 he was awarded the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy for his "outstanding contributions to the progress of philosophy in the 20th century by proposing numerous theories based on keen insights in logic, epistemology, philosophy of science and philosophy of language."

Contents

Biography

Gibson was born in St. Louis, Missouri, to Roger Fletcher Gibson Sr. and Virginia Irene Melton. He spent his formative years moving throughout the country, eventually coming to live with his maternal grandparents about whom he would later remark were the most influential people in his life. Gibson joined the United States Marine Corps out of high school and volunteered for duty in Vietnam. He served in Saigon from October 1965 to October 1966. He considered his military service one of his greatest achievements.

Gibson embarked upon the pursuit of philosophy as an academic career in 1967 upon the completion of his military service. He was ready to resume his education that year, having served in the United States Marine Corps immediately after high school, between 1962 and 1966, attached for part of that time as aide to General Westmoreland [1] during the height of the Vietnam War. He enrolled in Northeast Missouri State College, currently Truman State University, where he graduated in 1971 with a B.A. in philosophy.

United States Marine Corps Amphibious warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines or U.S. Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations with the United States Navy as well as the Army and Air Force. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.

Vietnam War 1955–1975 conflict in Vietnam

The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975, with U.S. involvement ending in 1973. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and South Vietnam. North Vietnam was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; South Vietnam was supported by the United States, South Korea, the Philippines, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war from some US perspectives. It lasted some 19 years and included the Laotian Civil War and the Cambodian Civil War, resulting in all three countries becoming communist states in 1975. The outcome of the war humiliated the United States and diminished its reputation in the world.

Truman State University university in Missouri, United States

Truman State University is a public liberal arts and sciences university located in Kirksville, Missouri, United States. It is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. It had 6,379 enrolled students in the fall of 2015, with 6,039 undergraduate and 340 postgraduate students, pursuing degrees in 50 undergraduate, and eight graduate programs. The university is named after U.S. President Harry Truman, the only president born in Missouri. From 1972 until 1996, the school was known as Northeast Missouri State University, but the Board of Trustees voted to change the school's name to better reflect its statewide mission. Truman State is the only public institution in Missouri that is officially designated to pursue highly selective admissions standards.

Encouraged by his undergraduate philosophy professors, Henry Smits and Kay Blair, both holding doctorates from the University of Missouri, he applied to their graduate program in philosophy and was admitted in the fall of 1971. [2] He developed a budding affinity for analytic philosophy while at the University of Missouri, receiving an M.A. in 1973 and a Ph.D. in 1977. His experience there was shaped by Arthur Berndtson, Donald Oliver, and John Kultgen, among others, the latter also directing his dissertation. [3]

University of Missouri public research university in Columbia, Missouri

The University of Missouri is a public, land-grant research university in Columbia, Missouri. It was founded in 1839 as the first public institution of higher education west of the Mississippi River. As the state's largest university, it enrolled 30,870 students in 2017, offering over 300 degree programs in 20 academic colleges. It is the flagship campus of the University of Missouri System, which also has campuses in Kansas City, Rolla, and St. Louis. There are more than 300,000 MU alumni living worldwide with over one half residing in Missouri.

Gibson served the discipline both as a leader and as a scholar. His first notable leadership role was as President of the Central States Philosophical Association in 1983–1984. His scholarly initiatives attracted attention from the outset, earning him grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1984–1985 [4] and 1988. [5] His academic career flourished at Washington University in St. Louis, where he began teaching in 1985. He served as the Chair of the Department of Philosophy there for a decade between 1989 and 1999. His many contributions to the department included spearheading the creation of the school's Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology (PNP) Program in 1993, playing a prominent role in securing grants for that purpose from the James S. McDonnell Foundation. [6]

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency of the U.S. government, established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities. The NEH is housed at 400 7th St SW, Washington, D.C. From 1979 to 2014, NEH was at 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. in the Nancy Hanks Center at the Old Post Office.

Washington University in St. Louis university in St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Washington University in St. Louis is a private research university located in the St. Louis metropolitan area and elsewhere in Missouri. Founded in 1853, and named after George Washington, the university has students and faculty from all 50 U.S. states and more than 120 countries. As of 2017, 24 Nobel laureates in economics, physiology and medicine, chemistry, and physics have been affiliated with Washington University, nine having done the major part of their pioneering research at the university. Washington University's undergraduate program is ranked 19th by U.S. News & World Report in 2018 and 11th by The Wall Street Journal in their 2018 rankings. The university is ranked 20th in the world in 2018 by the Academic Ranking of World Universities. The acceptance rate for the class of 2022 was 15%, with students selected from more than 31,000 applications. Of students admitted 81 percent were in the top 10 percent of their class.

The James S. McDonnell Foundation was founded in 1950 by aerospace pioneer James S. McDonnell. It was established to "improve the quality of life," and does so by contributing to the generation of new knowledge through its support of research and scholarship. Originally called the McDonnell Foundation, the organization was renamed the James S. McDonnell Foundation in 1984 in honor of its founder. The foundation is based in Saint Louis, Missouri.

Gibson's formal areas of expertise were epistemology and the philosophy of language, with further competence in the philosophy of science. While publishing extensively in these areas, his overall engagement with philosophy was broad and deep enough for publication in other specialties as well, including those as diverse as logic [7] and ethics. [8] [9] Most of his works, even on the rare occasion he turned to ethics, tend to revolve around the philosophy of W. V. Quine. [10] Those that do are all well-received (as are the few that do not), earning him a reputation as one of the world's leading exponents of Quine. [11]

That reputation is the culmination of an early and steadfast interest in Quine. His master's thesis (1973) [12] and doctoral dissertation (1977) [13] are both on Quine. His persistent appeals to the Harvard philosopher for permission to sit in on his classes at Harvard University, while himself still enrolled as a graduate student at the University of Missouri, are something of an academic legend, related by Quine himself both in his autobiography, The Time of My Life: An Autobiography (1985), [14] and in his foreword to Gibson's first book, The Philosophy of W. V. Quine: An Expository Essay (1982). [15] The permission granted paved the way for some of the most influential secondary literature on Quine, including two monographs, three edited volumes, and numerous articles. Gibson's two monographs — The Philosophy of W. V. Quine: An Expository Essay (1982) [16] and Enlightened Empiricism: An Examination of W. V. Quine's Theory of Knowledge (1988) [17] — are held in especially high regard.

His personal output on Quine was complemented by his ability to bring out the same in others. Attesting to his dedication to the enrichment of Quine studies, he organized, together with Robert B. Barrett Jr., a conference (April 9–13, 1988) bringing together at Washington University in St. Louis the world's foremost authorities on the subject, including Quine himself, as well as Donald Davidson, Dagfinn Føllesdal, Susan Haack, Gilbert Harman, Jaakko Hintikka, Jerrold Katz, Barry Stroud, and Joseph S. Ullian. The proceedings were published in 1990 as Perspectives on Quine. [18]

A festschrift organized in his honor in 2008 brought together eminent analytic philosophers from around the world: Robert B. Barrett Jr.; Lars Bergström; Richard Creath; David Henderson; Terence Horgan; Ernest Lepore; Pete Mandik; Alex Orenstein; Kenneth Shockley; J. Robert Thompson; Josefa Toribio; Joseph S. Ullian; Josh Weisberg; Chase B. Wrenn. [19]

Gibson died at the age of 71 in Reston, Virginia, after a long battle with Parkinson’s and Parkinson’s dementia.

Selected publications

Books

DatePublication
1982Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (1982). The Philosophy of W. V. Quine: An Expository Essay. Tampa: University Presses of Florida. ISBN   978-0-8130-0707-6.
1988Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (1988). Enlightened Empiricism: An Examination of W. V. Quine's Theory of Knowledge. Tampa: University Presses of Florida. ISBN   978-0-8130-0886-8.
1990Barrett, Robert B. Jr.; Gibson, Roger F. Jr., eds. (1990). Perspectives on Quine. Philosophers and Their Critics No. 6. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. ISBN   978-0-6311-6135-6.
2004Gibson, Roger F. Jr., ed. (2004). The Cambridge Companion to Quine. Cambridge Companions to Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   978-0-5216-3056-6.
2004Gibson, Roger F. Jr., ed. (2004). Quintessence: Basic Readings from the Philosophy of W. V. Quine. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. ISBN   978-0-6740-1048-2.

Articles

DatePublication (Gibson as sole author)
1980"Are There Really Two Quines?" Erkenntnis: An International Journal of Scientific Philosophy 15:3 (November 1980): 349–370. ISSN   0165-0106  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1007/BF02070844.
1983"A New Perspective on Quine." Journal of Thought 18:2 (Summer 1983): 73–84. ISSN   0022-5231  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN..
1984"On an Inconsistency in Thomson's Abortion Argument." Philosophical Studies 46:1 (July 1984): 131–139. ISSN   0031-8116  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1007/BF00353495.
1986"Corporations, Persons, and Moral Responsibility." Journal of Thought 21:2 (Summer 1986): 17–26. ISSN   0022-5231  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN..
1986"Quine's Dilemma." Synthese: An International Journal for Epistemology, Methodology and Philosophy of Science 69:1 (October 1986): 27–39. ISSN   0039-7857  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1007/BF01988285.
1986"Translation, Physics, and Facts of the Matter." Chapter 5 of The Philosophy of W. V. Quine (pp. 139–154, with Quine's reply in 155–157). Edited by Lewis Edwin Hahn and Paul Arthur Schilpp. The Library of Living Philosophers 18. La Salle: Open Court Publishing Company, 1986. Pagination identical in second, expanded edition, 1998. ISBN   978-0-8126-9012-5.
1986"Logic as a Core Curriculum Subject: Its Case as an Alternative to Mathematics." Journal of Philosophy of Education 20:1 (July 1986): 21–37. ISSN   1467-9752  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9752.1986.tb00107.x.
1987"A Rose by Another Name: A Rejoinder to Professors Hoffman and Frederick." Journal of Thought 22:1 (Spring 1987): 7–11. ISSN   0022-5231  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN..
1987"Quine on Naturalism and Epistemology." Erkenntnis: An International Journal of Scientific Philosophy 27:1 (July 1987): 57–78. ISSN   0165-0106  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1007/BF00169711.
1988"Flanagan on Quinean Ethics." Ethics 98:3 (April 1988): 534–540. (Flanagan's response follows in pp. 541–550 of the same volume.) ISSN   0014-1704  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1086/292970.
1989"Stroud on Naturalized Epistemology." Metaphilosophy 20:1 (January 1989): 1–11. ISSN   0026-1068  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9973.1989.tb00402.x.
1991"More on Quine's Dilemma of Underdetermination." Dialectica: International Journal of Philosophy of Knowledge 45:1 (March 1991): 59–66. ISSN   0012-2017  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1111/j.1746-8361.1991.tb00977.x.
1992"The Key to Interpreting Quine." The Southern Journal of Philosophy 30:4 (Winter 1992): 17–30. ISSN   0038-4283  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1111/j.2041-6962.1992.tb00644.x.
1993"Katz on Indeterminacy and the Proto-Theory." Chapter 16 of Naturalism and Normativity. Edited by Enrique Villanueva. Philosophical Issues 4 (1993): 167–173. (Reply by Katz appears as chapter 17 of the same volume: pp. 174–179). Atascadero: Ridgeview Publishing Company. ISSN   1533-6077  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.2307/1522838. Reprinted as a review of Jerrold J. Katz's The Metaphysics of Meaning (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1990): Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54:1 (March 1994): 133–138. ISSN   0031-8205  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.2307/2108360.
1993"Two Conceptions of Philosophy." Grazer Philosophische Studien: Internationale Zeitschrift für Analytische Philosophie 44 (1993): 25–39. ISSN   0165-9227  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.5840/gps19934431.
1994"Quine and Davidson: Two Naturalized Epistemologists." In Symposium on Quine's Philosophy. Edited by Dagfinn Føllesdal and Alastair Hannay. Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy (Special Issue) 37:4 (1994): 449–463. ISSN   0020-174X  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1080/00201749408602367.
1995"A Note on Boghossian's Master Argument." Chapter 19 of Content. Edited by Enrique Villanueva. Philosophical Issues 6 (1995): 222–226. ISSN   1533-6077  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.2307/1523043.
1996"McDowell's Direct Realism and Platonic Naturalism." Chapter 25 of Perception. Edited by Enrique Villanueva. Philosophical Issues 7 (1996): 275–281. (Reply by McDowell appears as the first part of chapter 26 of the same volume: pp. 283–285). Atascadero: Ridgeview Publishing Company. ISSN   1533-6077  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.2307/1522912.
1996"Quine, Wittgenstein and Holism." Chapter 4 of Wittgenstein and Quine (pp. 80–96). Edited by Robert L. Arrington and Hans-Johann Glock. London: Routledge, 1996. ISBN   978-0-4153-4904-8. Reprinted in Knowledge, Language and Logic: Questions for Quine (pp. 81–93). Essays presented to Professor Quine in celebration of his ninetieth birthday. Edited by Alex Orenstein and Petr Kotatko. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science No. 210. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000. ISBN   978-1-4020-0253-3. doi: 10.1007/978-94-011-3933-5 7.
1996"Quine's Behaviorism." Chapter 7 of The Philosophy of Psychology (pp. 96–107). Edited by William O'Donohue and Richard F. Kitchener. London: Sage Publications, 1996. ISBN   978-0-7619-5305-0. doi: 10.4135/9781446279168.n7. Reprinted as chapter 15 of the Handbook of Behaviorism (pp. 419–436). Edited by William O'Donohue and Richard F. Kitchener. San Diego: Academic Press, 1999. ISBN   978-0-1252-4190-8. doi: 10.1016/b978-012524190-8/50016-4.
1998"Quine's Philosophy: A Brief Sketch." Chapter 25 of The Philosophy of W. V. Quine (pp. 667–683, with Quine's reply in 684–685). Second, expanded edition. Edited by Lewis Edwin Hahn and Paul Arthur Schilpp. The Library of Living Philosophers 18. La Salle: Open Court Publishing Company, 1998. Gibson's "Sketch" is not in the original edition of 1986. ISBN   978-0-8126-9371-3.
2002"Remembering Willard van Orman Quine (1908–2000)." Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33:2 (2002): 213–229. ISSN   0925-4560  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1023/A:1022460321692.
2003"Quine." Chapter 29 of The World's Great Philosophers (pp. 253–260). Edited by Robert L. Arrington. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2003. ISBN   978-0-6312-3145-5. doi: 10.1002/9780470693704.ch29.
2004"Quine's Behaviorism cum Empiricism." Chapter 7 of The Cambridge Companion to Quine (pp. 181–199). Edited by Roger F. Gibson Jr. Cambridge Companions to Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Abridged and corrected version of Gibson's "Quine's Behaviorism" (1996 [= 1999]). ISBN   978-0-5216-3056-6. doi: 10.1017/CCOL0521630568.008.
2004"Willard Van Orman Quine." In The Cambridge Companion to Quine (pp. 1–18). Edited by Roger F. Gibson Jr. Cambridge Companions to Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. ISBN   978-0-5216-3056-6. doi: 10.1017/CCOL0521630568.001.
2006"W. V. Quine." Chapter 9 of A Companion to Pragmatism (pp. 101–107). Edited by John R. Shook and Joseph Margolis. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2006. ISBN   978-1-4051-1621-3. doi: 10.1002/9780470997079.ch10.

Reviews

DatePublication (Gibson as sole author)
1989Review of Christopher Hookway's Quine: Language, Experience and Reality (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1988). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40:4 (December 1989): 557–567. ISSN   0007-0882  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1093/bjps/40.4.557.
1989Review of Paul Gochet's Ascent to Truth: A Critical Examination of Quine's Philosophy (Munich: Philosophia Verlag, 1986). Metaphilosophy 20:2 (April 1989): 163–168. ISSN   0026-1068  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9973.1989.tb00416.x.
1989Review of Robert Feleppa's Convention, Translation, and Understanding: Philosophical Problems in the Comparative Study of Culture (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1988). Southwest Philosophy Review 5:2 (July 1989) 83–90. ISSN   0897-2346  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.5840/swphilreview19895226.
1992Review of Mark Sacks's The World We Found: The Limits of Ontological Talk (La Salle: Open Court, 1989). The Philosophical Review 101:3 (July 1992): 673–675. ISSN   0031-8108  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.2307/2186076.
1994Review of Peter Lipton's Inference to the Best Explanation (Philosophical Issues in Science Series. New York: Routledge, 1991). The Review of Metaphysics 48:2 (December 1994): 417–418. ISSN   0034-6632  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN..
1995Review of Rudolf Fara and Michael Fara's In Conversation: W. V. Quine (Audiovisual series originally issued on VHS tape. London: Philosophy in Britain, Philosophy International, Centre for the Philosophy of the Natural and Social Sciences, The London School of Economics and Political Science, 1994.) Mind (New Series) 104:415 (July 1995): 637–645. ISSN   0026-4423  Parameter error in {{ issn }}: Invalid ISSN.. doi: 10.1093/mind/104.415.637.

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References

  1. "Roger F. Gibson Jr". Washington University in St. Louis. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
  2. "Roger F. Gibson Jr". University of Missouri. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
  3. "Roger F. Gibson Jr". University of Missouri. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
  4. "Grant (#FB-22459-84) for the study of Willard Van Orman Quine". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
  5. "Grant (#FT-31150-88) for the study of Donald Davidson". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
  6. "Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology (PNP) Program". Washington University in St. Louis. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
  7. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (July 1986). "Logic as a Core Curriculum Subject: Its Case as an Alternative to Mathematics". Journal of Philosophy of Education. 20:1: 21–37. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9752.1986.tb00107.x. ISSN   1467-9752.
  8. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (July 1984). "On an Inconsistency in Thomson's Abortion Argument". Philosophical Studies. 46:1: 131–139. doi:10.1007/BF00353495. ISSN   0031-8116.
  9. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (Summer 1986). "Corporations, Persons, and Moral Responsibility". Journal of Thought. 21:2: 17–26. ISSN   0022-5231.
  10. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (April 1988). "Flanagan on Quinean Ethics". Ethics. 98:3: 534–540. doi:10.1086/292970. ISSN   0014-1704.
  11. Wrenn, Chase B., ed. (2008). Naturalism, Reference, and Ontology: Essays in Honor of Roger F. Gibson. New York: Peter Lang. p. 6. ISBN   978-1-4331-0229-5.
  12. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (1973). Quinean Analysis (M.A.). University of Missouri-Columbia. OCLC   9144809.
  13. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (1977). The Logical Structure of Quine's Philosophy (Ph.D.). University of Missouri-Columbia. OCLC   3961078.
  14. Quine, W. V. (1985). The Time of My Life: An Autobiography. Cambridge: MIT Press. p. 422. ISBN   978-0-2621-7003-1.
  15. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (1982). The Philosophy of W. V. Quine: An Expository Essay. Tampa: University Presses of Florida. pp. xi. ISBN   978-0-8130-0707-6.
  16. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (1982). The Philosophy of W. V. Quine: An Expository Essay. Tampa: University Presses of Florida. ISBN   978-0-8130-0707-6.
  17. Gibson, Roger F. Jr. (1988). Enlightened Empiricism: An Examination of W. V. Quine's Theory of Knowledge. Tampa: University Presses of Florida. ISBN   978-0-8130-0886-8.
  18. Barrett, Robert B. Jr.; Gibson, Roger F. Jr., eds. (1990). Perspectives on Quine. Philosophers and Their Critics No. 6. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. ISBN   978-0-6311-6135-6.
  19. Wrenn, Chase B., ed. (2008). Naturalism, Reference, and Ontology: Essays in Honor of Roger F. Gibson. New York: Peter Lang. ISBN   978-1-4331-0229-5.