Rogerstone

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Rogerstone
Newport UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Rogerstone
Location within Newport
Population10,158 (2011 census) [1]
OS grid reference ST271885
Principal area
Country Wales
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town NEWPORT
Postcode district NP10
Dialling code 01633
Police Gwent
Fire South Wales
Ambulance Welsh
EU Parliament Wales
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
Wales
Newport
51°35′26″N3°03′13″W / 51.59061°N 3.05371°W / 51.59061; -3.05371 Coordinates: 51°35′26″N3°03′13″W / 51.59061°N 3.05371°W / 51.59061; -3.05371
Rogerstone library Rogerstone library in 2007.jpg
Rogerstone library

Rogerstone (Welsh : Tŷ du, meaning "Black house") is a large village, ward and community (parish) of the city of Newport, southeastern Wales. The area is governed by the Newport City Council. The village falls within the ancient parish of Bassaleg and historic county of Monmouthshire.

Welsh language Brythonic language spoken natively in Wales

Welsh ; [kəmˈrɑːɨɡ](listen)) or y Gymraeg is a Brittonic language of the Celtic branch of the Indo-European language family. It is spoken natively in Wales, by some in England, and in Y Wladfa. Historically, it has also been known in English as 'British', 'Cambrian', 'Cambric' and 'Cymric'.

A community is a division of land in Wales that forms the lowest tier of local government in Wales. Welsh communities are analogous to civil parishes in England. In 2016 there were 870 communities in Wales.

Newport, Wales City and County in Wales


Newport is a city and unitary authority area in south east Wales, on the River Usk close to its confluence with the Severn Estuary, 12 miles (19 km) northeast of Cardiff. At the 2011 census, it was the third largest city in Wales, with a population of 145,700. The city forms part of the Cardiff-Newport metropolitan area, with a population of 1,097,000.

Contents

The parish lies at the gateway to the Sirhowy valley, to the north of Newport on the eastern side of the Ebbw River. [2] It is bounded by the M4 motorway to the south, the Ebbw River to the west, the Henllys vale to the east and the city boundary with Caerphilly county borough to the north.

Ebbw River river in the United Kingdom

The Ebbw River is a river in South Wales.

M4 motorway motorway in the United Kingdom

The M4, a motorway in the United Kingdom running from west London to southwest Wales, was originally referred to as the London-South Wales Motorway. The English section to the Severn Bridge was constructed between 1961 and 1971; the Welsh element was completed in 1993. The Second Severn Crossing officially renamed the Prince of Wales Bridge, was inaugurated on 5 June 1996 by the Prince of Wales and the M4 was rerouted. Apart from its two spurs—the A48(M) and the M48—the M4 is the only motorway in Wales.

Rogerstone railway station is on the Ebbw Valley Railway. It opened on 6 February 2008 and links Ebbw Vale to Cardiff Central via Rogerstone.

Rogerstone railway station

Rogerstone railway station is a station on the Ebbw Valley Railway in the community of Rogerstone in Newport, south Wales. The station is situated ½ mile north of the original station on the site of former rail sidings. The station is within the Afon Village housing development. Access to the single-platform station and associated car park is off Lily Way.

Ebbw Valley Railway

The Ebbw Valley Railway is a branch line of the Great Western Main Line in South Wales. Transport for Wales Rail provides an hourly passenger service each way, between Ebbw Vale Town and Cardiff Central.

Cardiff Central railway station Grade II listed building in Cardiff. Railway station in Cardiff, Wales

Cardiff Central railway station is a major station on the South Wales Main Line in Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and one of two hubs of the city's urban rail network.

History

The original settlement dates back to Norman times when Rogerstone Castle was built in the early part of the 12th century.[ citation needed ] The name is said to originate from Roger de Haia, the Norman Lord who was responsible for the building of the castle, the remains of which are reduced to a low bush and tree covered motte opposite Criddle's garage on the lower section of Tregwilym Road.[ citation needed ] The Welsh name for Rogerstone "Tŷ Du" translates to English as "Black House", though no one is entirely sure why it has this name.[ citation needed ]

Normans European ethnic group emerging in the 10th and 11th century in France

The Normans were an ethnic group that arose in Normandy, a northern region of France, from contact between indigenous Franks, Gallo-Romans, and Norse Viking settlers. The settlements followed a series of raids on the French coast from Denmark, Norway, and Iceland, and they gained political legitimacy when the Viking leader Rollo agreed to swear fealty to King Charles III of West Francia. The distinct cultural and ethnic identity of the Normans emerged initially in the first half of the 10th century, and it continued to evolve over the succeeding centuries.

Castle Fortified residential structure of medieval Europe

A castle is a type of fortified structure built during the Middle Ages predominantly by the nobility or royalty and by military orders. Scholars debate the scope of the word castle, but usually consider it to be the private fortified residence of a lord or noble. This is distinct from a palace, which is not fortified; from a fortress, which was not always a residence for royalty or nobility; and from a fortified settlement, which was a public defence – though there are many similarities among these types of construction. Usage of the term has varied over time and has been applied to structures as diverse as hill forts and country houses. Over the approximately 900 years that castles were built, they took on a great many forms with many different features, although some, such as curtain walls, arrowslits, and portcullises, were commonplace.

The larger parish of Rogerstone started as two distinct settlements of Tregwilym and Tydu, Tregwilym taking its name from the land owner, William de Berkerolles.[ citation needed ] These hamlets remained predominantly rural until the advent of the industrial revolution. The population grew in response to the tin, iron and aluminium industries which flourished near the South Wales coalfield. At one point, the village boasted the longest aluminium rolling mill in Western Europe and one of the largest marshalling yards on the Great Western Railway network.[ citation needed ]

Tin Chemical element with atomic number 50

Tin is a chemical element with the symbol Sn (from Latin: stannum) and atomic number 50. Tin is a silvery metal that characteristicly has a faint yellow hue. Tin, like indium, is soft enough to be cut without much force. When a bar of tin is bent the so-called "tin cry" can be heard as a result of sliding tin crystals reforming; this trait is shared by indium, cadmium and frozen mercury. Pure tin after solidifying keeps a mirror-like appearance similar to most metals. However, in most tin alloys (such as pewter) the metal solidifies with a dull gray color. Tin is a post-transition metal in group 14 of the periodic table of elements. It is obtained chiefly from the mineral cassiterite, which contains stannic oxide, SnO2. Tin shows a chemical similarity to both of its neighbors in group 14, germanium and lead, and has two main oxidation states, +2 and the slightly more stable +4. Tin is the 49th most abundant element and has, with 10 stable isotopes, the largest number of stable isotopes in the periodic table, thanks to its magic number of protons. It has two main allotropes: at room temperature, the stable allotrope is β-tin, a silvery-white, malleable metal, but at low temperatures, it transforms into the less dense grey α-tin, which has the diamond cubic structure. Metallic tin does not easily oxidize in air.

Iron Chemical element with atomic number 26

Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe and atomic number 26. It is a metal, that belongs to the first transition series and group 8 of the periodic table. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust.

Aluminium Chemical element with atomic number 13

Aluminium is a chemical element with the symbol Al and atomic number 13. It is a silvery-white, soft, non-magnetic and ductile metal in the boron group. By mass, aluminium makes up about 8% of the Earth's crust; it is the third most abundant element after oxygen and silicon and the most abundant metal in the crust, though it is less common in the mantle below. The chief ore of aluminium is bauxite. Aluminium metal is so chemically reactive that native specimens are rare and limited to extreme reducing environments. Instead, it is found combined in over 270 different minerals.

The village played host to John Frost and his fellow Chartists on their historical march from the valleys to Newport, the Welsh Oak public house just north of the parish being one of the key meeting points for the protestors before they set off through the parish towards the Westgate Hotel and turmoil.[ citation needed ]

John Frost (Chartist) Welsh Chartist

John Frost was a prominent leader of the British Chartist movement in the Newport Rising.

Chartism British democratic movement (1838-1857)

Chartism was a working-class movement for political reform in Britain that existed from 1838 to 1857. It took its name from the People's Charter of 1838 and was a national protest movement, with particular strongholds of support in Northern England, the East Midlands, the Staffordshire Potteries, the Black Country, and the South Wales Valleys. Support for the movement was at its highest in 1839, 1842, and 1848, when petitions signed by millions of working people were presented to the House of Commons. The strategy employed was to use the scale of support which these petitions and the accompanying mass meetings demonstrated to put pressure on politicians to concede manhood suffrage. Chartism thus relied on constitutional methods to secure its aims, though there were some who became involved in insurrectionary activities, notably in South Wales and in Yorkshire.

The parish sits astride the Crumlin branch of the Monmouthshire Canal and plays host to the Fourteen Locks. [3] The canal opened in 1798 but was dogged by water supply problems and competition from the railways and by 1930, it had finally succumbed and has since fallen into disrepair.[ citation needed ]

Rogerstone Library is part of Newport City Council's library service, and is officially titled Rogerstone Library and Information Centre. The building was opened in 1905 as a Carnegie Library. Newport has a second Carnegie Library on Corporation Road.

Modern-day Rogerstone

The designation of the Rogerstone section of the canal as part of the National Cycle Network (route 47) and more recent efforts to restore parts of the canal have made the site a popular tourist attraction. The restoration of the locks of the canal has already cost millions, with only a few locks completed so far. Funding for this work has been provided by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The rubbish and mud lying at the bottom of the locks is being removed and the old stones that used to lie at the bottom of the locks will now be removed and replaced. The site houses the 14 Locks Canal Centre which was the subject of an arson attack in 2012 which ruined the inside of the centre. It has now been fully refurbished and is open to the public.

Rogerstone was traditionally an industrial, working-class village, but recent expensive housing developments such as Foxgloves, on the site of the former power station, has added more than 1,000 dwellings and an ever-increasing middle-class population. This has been influenced by the improved transport links.

In 2005, Warburtons opened a new bakery in the village, to supply bakery products across South Wales. However, after the financial crisis of 2007–2008, in 2010, the company announced the closure of the facility, and the loss of 140 jobs. The plant was later bought by local family owned Brace's Bakery. [4]

There are four primary schools within Rogerstone; Rogerstone Primary, Mount Pleasant Primary, High Cross Primary and Jubilee Park Primary.

Related Research Articles

Abercarn small town and community in Caerphilly, Wales

Abercarn is a small town and community in Caerphilly county borough, Wales. It is 10 miles (16 km) northwest of Newport on the A467 between Cwmcarn and Newbridge, within the historic boundaries of Monmouthshire.

Monmouthshire County

Monmouthshire is a county in south-east Wales. The name derives from the historic county of Monmouthshire of which it covers the eastern 60%. The largest town is Abergavenny. Other towns and large villages are Caldicot, Chepstow, Monmouth, Magor and Usk. It borders Torfaen and Newport to the west; Herefordshire and Gloucestershire to the east; and Powys to the north.

Risca town in Wales

Risca is a town of approximately 11,500 people in south-east Wales, within the Caerphilly County Borough and the historic boundaries of Monmouthshire. It is today part of the Newport conurbation, though it is not a Ward of Newport City Council. Risca has a railway station, opened on the Ebbw Valley Railway in February 2008, after a gap of 46 years. It is split into two communities Risca East and Risca West.

Crumlin, Caerphilly town, community and an electoral ward in Caerphilly county borough in South Wales

Crumlin is a town, community and an electoral ward in Caerphilly county borough in South Wales, situated in the Ebbw River valley, five miles west of Pontypool, within the historic boundaries of Monmouthshire.

Railway stations in Newport

There have been many railway stations in Newport, due to its importance as a port for the industrial Monmouthshire and Glamorganshire valleys. The only stations in use at the moment are Newport in the city centre and in the Western valley Pye Corner and Rogerstone.

Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal network of canals in South Wales

The Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal is a small network of canals in South Wales. For most of its currently (2018) navigable 35-mile (56 km) length it runs through the Brecon Beacons National Park, and its present rural character and tranquillity belies its original purpose as an industrial corridor for coal and iron, which were brought to the canal by a network of tramways and/or railroads, many of which were built and owned by the canal company.

Fourteen Locks

Fourteen Locks is a series of locks, also known as the Cefn Flight, on the Crumlin arm of the Monmouthshire Canal at Rogerstone in Newport, South Wales. The flight of locks was completed in 1799 and raises the water level 160 ft in just 800 yd. This is one of the steepest rises for a major run in the UK which, combined with the sheer number of locks, makes it one of the most significant in the country. The run of locks includes a series of embanked ponds, pounds, sluices and weirs to control the water supply, with no set of gates shared between individual locks. It therefore comprises a flight of locks rather than a lock staircase.

Risca and Pontymister railway station

Risca and Pontymister railway station is a station on the Ebbw Valley Railway in south-east Wales. It serves the village of Pontymister and the town of Risca. It is located roughly ½ mile south of the original Risca railway station.

Warburtons is a British baking firm founded by Thomas Warburton in 1876 and based in Bolton, a town in Lancashire, England. For much of its history Warburtons only had bakeries in Lancashire and it remains a family-owned company.

Bassaleg is a small semi-urban suburb on the west side of the city of Newport, in south Wales. It lies in the Graig electoral ward and community.

Rhiwderin

Rhiwderin is a small village in the west of the city of Newport, South Wales.

Redwick, Newport village in Newport, south-east Wales

Redwick is a small village and community (parish) to the south east of the city of Newport, in Wales, United Kingdom. It lies within the Newport city boundaries, in the historic county of Monmouthshire and the preserved county of Gwent.

High Cross is a suburb of the city of Newport, South Wales, and forms part of the community (parish) of Rogerstone.

Llangynidr village in the county of Powys, Wales

Llangynidr is a village, community and electoral ward in Powys, Wales, about 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Crickhowell and 9 miles (14.5 km) south-east of Brecon. The River Usk flows through the village as does the Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal. It is in the historic county of Brecknockshire.

Llanvihangel Crucorney village in United Kingdom

Llanvihangel Crucorney is a small village in the community (parish) of Crucorney, Monmouthshire, Wales. It is located 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Abergavenny and 18 miles (29 km) south-west of Hereford, England on the A465 road.

The Monmouthshire Railway and Canal Company was a canal and railway company that operated a canal and a network of railways in the Western Valley and Eastern Valley of Newport, Monmouthshire. It started as the Monmouthshire Canal Navigation and opened canals from Newport to Pontypool and to Crumlin from 1796. Numerous tramroads connected nearby pits and ironworks with the canal.

Brace's Bakery is a Crumlin-based Welsh bakery and bakery products brand. It is still family owned, presently run in the hands of the fourth generation.

References

  1. "Newport ward 2011" . Retrieved 5 April 2015.
  2. Grazing, above Rogerstone:: OS grid ST2788 :: Geograph Britain and Ireland - photograph every grid square!
  3. Fourteen Locks Canal Centre:: OS grid ST2788 :: Geograph Britain and Ireland - photograph every grid square!
  4. "Brace's Confirms Purchase of Warburtons' Site At Rogerstone, Newport". Brace's Bakery. 14 February 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011.