Rolf Liebermann

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Rolf Liebermann
Rolf Liebermann par Claude Truong-Ngoc 1980.jpeg
Rolf Liebermann,
by Claude Truong-Ngoc (1980)
Born(1910-09-14)14 September 1910
Zürich, Switzerland
Died2 January 1999(1999-01-02) (aged 88)
Paris, France
OccupationComposer
Years active1943–1999

Rolf Liebermann (14 September 1910 – 2 January 1999 [1] ), was a Swiss composer and music administrator. He served as the Artistic Director of the Hamburg State Opera from 1959–1973 and again from 1985–1988. He was also Artistic Director of the Paris Opera from 1973–1980.

Switzerland federal republic in Central Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a country situated in western, central, and southern Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern as the seat of the federal authorities. The sovereign state is a federal republic bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. Switzerland is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million people is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are to be found: among them are the two global cities and economic centres Zürich and Geneva.

Hamburg State Opera opera building in Hamburg, Germany

The Hamburg State Opera is a German opera company based in Hamburg. Its theatre is located near the square of Gänsemarkt. Since 2015, the current Intendant of the company is Georges Delnon, and the current Generalmusikdirektor of the company is Kent Nagano.

Paris Opera the primary opera company of France

The Paris Opera is the primary opera and ballet company of France. It was founded in 1669 by Louis XIV as the Académie d'Opéra, and shortly thereafter was placed under the leadership of Jean-Baptiste Lully and officially renamed the Académie Royale de Musique, but continued to be known more simply as the Opéra. Classical ballet as it is known today arose within the Paris Opera as the Paris Opera Ballet and has remained an integral and important part of the company. Currently called the Opéra National de Paris, it mainly produces operas at its modern 2700-seat theatre Opéra Bastille which opened in 1989, and ballets and some classical operas at the older 1970-seat Palais Garnier which opened in 1875. Small scale and contemporary works are also staged in the 500-seat Amphitheatre under the Opéra Bastille.

Contents

Life

Liebermann was born in Zürich, and studied composition and conducting with Hermann Scherchen in Budapest and Vienna in the 1930s, and later with Wladimir Vogel in Basel. His compositional output involved several different musical genres, including chansons, classical, and light music. His classical music often combines myriad styles and techniques, including those drawn from baroque, classical, and twelve-tone music.

Zürich Place in Switzerland

Zürich or Zurich is the largest city in Switzerland and the capital of the canton of Zürich. It is located in north-central Switzerland at the northwestern tip of Lake Zürich. The municipality has approximately 409,000 inhabitants, the urban agglomeration 1.315 million and the Zürich metropolitan area 1.83 million. Zürich is a hub for railways, roads, and air traffic. Both Zürich Airport and railway station are the largest and busiest in the country.

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Liebermann was the director of the Hamburg Staatsoper from 1959 to 1973, and again from 1985 to 1988. [1] During his tenure in Hamburg, he commissioned 24 new operas, including The Devils by Krzysztof Penderecki, Der Prinz von Homburg by Hans Werner Henze, and Help, Help, the Globolinks! by Gian Carlo Menotti. In the intervening years he served as director of the Paris Opera from 1973 to 1980. He died in Paris. [2]

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At the inaugural Eurovision Song Contest in 1956, Liebermann acted as the president of the jury; being responsible for moderating and finalising the results of the seven international juries judging the competition. [3]

Eurovision Song Contest Annual song competition held among the member countries of the European Broadcasting Union

The Eurovision Song Contest, often simply called Eurovision, is an international song competition held primarily among the member countries of the European Broadcasting Union. Each participating country submits an original song to be performed on live television and radio, then casts votes for the other countries' songs to determine the winner. At least 50 countries are eligible to compete as of 2018, and since 2015, Australia has been allowed as a guest entrant.

In 1989, he was the head of the jury at the 39th Berlin International Film Festival. [4]

39th Berlin International Film Festival 1989 film festival edition

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Works

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References

  1. 1 2 John W. Freeman (March 1999). "The Houdini of Opera: Rolf Liebermann". Opera News . 63 (9).
  2. Tom Sutcliffe, "Fanfare of the opera" (obituary), The Guardian, 14 January 1999
  3. John Kennedy O'Connor, The Eurovision Song Contest—The Official History (Carlton Books, 2010).[ full citation needed ]
  4. "Berlinale: 1989 Juries". berlinale.de. Retrieved 9 March 2011.
  5. Hans Koeltzsch (1967). Der neue Opernführer (in German). Hamburg: Deutscher Bücherbund Stuttgart.