Roma (opera)

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Roma
Opera by Jules Massenet
Georges Rochegrosse - Jules Massenet - Roma.jpg
Poster by Georges Rochegrosse for the Paris première
Librettist Henri Cain
LanguageFrench
Based onRome vaincue
by Alexandre Parodi
Premiere
17 February 1912 (1912-02-17)

Roma is an opera in five acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Henri Cain based on the play Rome vaincue by Dominique-Alexandre Parodi. It was first performed at the Opéra de Monte Carlo on 17 February 1912.

Contents

Roma was the last opera by Massenet to premiere in his lifetime. Three operas were subsequently premiered posthumously: Panurge (1913), Cléopâtre (1914) and Amadis (1922). The piece has not survived into the modern operatic repertoire, but has been revived recently and recorded by the Teatro la Fenice in Venice.

Roles

RoleVoice typePremiere Cast, [1] 17 February 1912
(Conductor: Léon Jehin)
Lentulus tenor Lucien Muratore
Fabius Maximus baritone Jean-François Delmas
Fausta soprano Maria Nikolaevna Kuznetsova
Lucius Cornélius bass Pierre Clauzure
Posthumia contralto Lucy Arbell
Juniasoprano Julia Guiraudon
Vestaporbaritone Jean Noté
The Grand Vestalsoprano Éliane Peltier
GallasopranoDoussot
CaïusbaritoneKozline/Skano
An old manbaritoneGasparini
Chorus: Senators, Priests, Vestal virgins, people.

Synopsis

The story takes place in Ancient Rome, following the Carthaginian triumph at the Battle of Cannae. Fausta, daughter of Fabius, has allowed the sacred fires to burn out at the Temple of Vesta, profaning the sanctuary. After failed attempts to escape her fate, to be buried alive wrapped in a black veil, Fausta returns to Rome to accept her punishment. As she is being led to execution, her blind grandmother, Posthumia, hands her Fabius' dagger. Fausta's hands are bound, however, and Posthumia must kill her granddaughter to spare her from the burial and expiate the sacrilege.

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References

Notes

  1. Casaglia, Gherardo (2005). "Roma, 17 February 1912" . L'Almanacco di Gherardo Casaglia (in Italian).