Roman Catholic Suburbicarian Diocese of Porto-Santa Rufina

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Suburbicarian Diocese of Porto-Santa Rufina

Portuensis-Sanctae Rufinae
La Storta (Roma) - Sacri Cuori di Gesu e Maria 5.JPG
La Storta (Roma) Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Rome
Statistics
Area2,000 km2 (770 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2004)
307,000
300,000 (97.7%)
Parishes52
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established3rd century
CathedralCattedrale dei Sacri Cuori di Gesù e Maria (La Storta)
Co-cathedralChiesa di SS. Ippolito e Lucia (Portus)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Gino Reali
Website
diocesiportosantarufina.it

The Diocese of Porto-Santa Rufina (Latin: Portuensis et Sanctae Rufinae) is a suburbicarian diocese of the Diocese of Rome and a diocese of the Catholic Church in Italy. It was formed from the union of two dioceses. The diocese of Santa Rufina was also formerly known as Silva Candida.

Latin Indo-European language of the Italic family

Latin is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet.

The seven suburbicarian dioceses are Roman Catholic dioceses located in the vicinity of Rome, whose (titular) bishops are the ordinary members of the highest-ranking order of Cardinals, the Cardinal Bishops.

Diocese of Rome Diocese of the Catholic Church in Rome, Italy

The Diocese of Rome is a diocese of the Catholic Church in Rome. The Bishop of Rome or the Roman Bishop is the Pope, the Supreme Pontiff and leader of the Catholic Church. As the Holy See, the papacy is a sovereign entity with diplomatic relations, and civil jurisdiction over the Vatican City State located geographically within Rome. The Diocese of Rome is the metropolitan diocese of the Province of Rome, an ecclesiastical province in Italy. The first Bishop of Rome was Saint Peter in the first century. The incumbent since 13 March 2013 is Pope Francis.

Contents

From 1967, the diocese has had both a titular cardinal bishop, and a resident bishop who handles the diocesan business.

History

Early Christian history of Porto

Porto was in ancient times Portus, the chief harbour of Rome. It owes its origin to the port built by Claudius on the right of the Tiber, opposite Ostia. Trajan enlarged the basin, and in a short time there grew around it a city which soon became independent of Ostia.

Claudius Augustus

Claudius was Roman emperor from AD 41 to 54. Born to Drusus and Antonia Minor at Lugdunum in Roman Gaul, where his father was stationed as a military legate, he was the first Roman emperor to be born outside Italy. Nonetheless, Claudius was an Italic of Sabine origins and a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Because he was afflicted with a limp and slight deafness due to sickness at a young age, his family ostracized him and excluded him from public office until his consulship, shared with his nephew Caligula in 37.

Tiber river in Italy

The Tiber is the third-longest river in Italy, rising in the Apennine Mountains in Emilia-Romagna and flowing 406 kilometres (252 mi) through Tuscany, Umbria and Lazio, where it is joined by the river Aniene, to the Tyrrhenian Sea, between Ostia and Fiumicino. It drains a basin estimated at 17,375 square kilometres (6,709 sq mi). The river has achieved lasting fame as the main watercourse of the city of Rome, founded on its eastern banks.

Ostia (Rome) Frazione in Lazio, Italy

Ostia is a large neighbourhood in the X Municipio of the comune of Rome, Italy, near the ancient port of Rome, which is now a major archaeological site known as Ostia Antica. Ostia is also the only municipio or district of Rome on the Tyrrhenian Sea, and many Romans spend the summer holidays there.

It was near Porto that Julius Nepos compelled Emperor Glycerius to abdicate (474). During the Gothic War the town served the Goths (537 and 549) and the Byzantines (546–552) as a base of operations against Rome. In the 9th and 10th centuries it was sacked on several occasions by the Saracens. In 849 Pope Leo IV fortified it and established there a colony of Corsicans for the defence of the coast and the neighbouring territory, but the city continued to decay.

Julius Nepos Augustus of the Western Roman Empire

Julius Nepos was de jure and de facto Western Roman Emperor from AD 474 to 475 and then only de jure until his death in AD 480. He was also the ruler of Roman Dalmatia from AD 468 to 480.

Pope Leo IV pope of the Roman Catholic Church

Pope Leo IV was pope from 10 April 847 to his death in 855. He is remembered for repairing Roman churches that had been damaged during Arab raids on Rome, and for building the Leonine Wall around Vatican Hill. Pope Leo organized a league of Italian cities who fought the sea Battle of Ostia against the Saracens.

Christianity was early established there. Several martyrs of Porto are known, including Herculanus, Hyacinthus, Martialis, Saturninus Epictetus, Maprilis and Felix. The place was also famous as the probable see of St. Hippolytus.

Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls Church in Rome, Italy

The Papal Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls, commonly known as Saint Paul's Outside the Walls, is one of Rome's four ancient, papal, major basilicas, along with the basilicas of Saint John in the Lateran, Saint Peter's, and Saint Mary Major.

In 314 Gregorius was bishop. The great xenodochium , or hospice, of Pammachius was built about 370.

In the early Middle Ages, a xenodochium or xenodoch(e)ion was either a hostel or hospital, usually specifically for foreigners or pilgrims, although the term could refer to charitable institutions in general. The xenodochium was a church institution that first appeared in the Byzantine world. Xenodochia were more common than institutions of a more specific nature, such as the gerocomium, nosocomium and orphanotrophium. A hospital for victims of plague was called a xenodochium pestiferorum.

Early Christian history of Santa Rufina

Santa Rufina grew up around the basilica of the Holy Martyrs Sts. Rufina and Secunda on the Via Aurelia, fourteen miles (21 km) from Rome; the basilica is said to have been begun by Pope Julius I, and was finished by Saint Damasus. In the 9th century this town was destroyed by the Saracens, and the efforts of Pope Leo IV and Pope Sergius III were unable to save it from total ruin: all that remains are the remnants of the ancient basilica and a chapel.

The first notice of it as an episcopal see dates from the 5th century, when its bishop Adeodatus was present at the councils held by Pope Symmachus; its bishop St. Valentinus, Vicar of Rome during the absence of Pope Vigilius, had his hands cut off by Totila. Among its other bishops mention should be made of

The residence of the bishops of Silva Candida was on the Insula Tiberina beside the church of Sts. Adalbert and Paulinus, while that of the bishops of Porto was on the same island near the church of San Giovanni. The bishops of Silva Candida, moreover, enjoyed great prerogatives in relation with the ceremonies of the basilica of St. Peter.

The most famous of these prelates was Cardinal Humbertus (1050–1061), who accompanied Leo IX from Burgundy to Rome; he was appointed Bishop of Sicily by that pope, but, having been prevented by the Normans from landing on the island, he received the See of Silva Candida, and later was sent to Constantinople to settle the controversies aroused by Michael Cærularius. He wrote against the errors of the Greeks and against Berengarius (1051–63).

The last legitimate Bishop was Mainardo of Pomposa (1061–1073). During the schism of antipope Clement III there was a pseudocardinal-bishop Adalbert (1084–1102), later antipope Adalbert (1102).

Historically, the Bishop of Porto became the second cardinal, the Bishop of Ostia being the first, and officiated on Mondays in the Lateran Basilica; he obtained, moreover, the other rights of the Bishop of Santa Rufina, but lost jurisdiction over the Leonine City and its environs, when they were united to the city of Rome.

Recent History

In 1826, Civitavecchia was separated from the Diocese of Viterbo and Toscanella and united with that of Porto, but in 1854, with Corneto, it was made an independent see. Mention should be made of the Cardinal Bishop of Porto Luigi Lambruschini (1847), who restored the cathedral and the episcopal palace.

From the 16th century, the incumbency of prelates of this see was, as a rule, of short duration, because most of the cardinal-bishops preferred the See of Ostia and Velletri, which they exchanged for their own as soon as possible.

The Diocese of Cære, now Cerveteri, has been united with that of Porto since the 12th century. Cære was an ancient city, called at first Agylla, where the sanctuaries of Rome and the Vestals were hidden during the invasion of the Gauls; the Etruscan tombs scattered about its territory are important archeologically. Cervetri had bishops of its own until the 11th century; the first was Adeodatus (499), assuming that he was not the Adeodatus who signed himself Bishop of Silva-Candida in the third synod of Pope Symmachus (501). The last known was Benedictus, referred to in 1015 and 1029. The Diocese of Porto and Santa Rufina has 18 parishes, with 4600 inhabitants.

Incumbents

Cardinal bishops of Porto

  • Donatus (date uncertain), who built the basilica of St. Eutropius
  • Felix, a contemporary of Gregory the Great
  • Joannes, legate to the Sixth General Council (680)
  • Gregorius, who accompanied Pope Constantine to Constantinople (710)
  • Gregorius II (743–761) [1]
  • Citonatus, present at the consecration of the antipope Constantine (767)
  • Giovanni (797 – between 814 and 826) [1]
  • Stephano (826–853) [1]
  • Radoald (853–864). [1] He acted contrary to his instructions on the occasion of the difficulties with Photius at the Council of Constantinople (861), and was deposed for having prevaricated in connection with the divorce of Lothair II of Lorraine
  • Formosus (864–876), [2] who became pope (891)
  • Walpert (876–883) [1]
  • Valentino (883) [1]
  • Cardinal Formoso (later Pope Formosus) (864 – 876, 883 – 891.10.06)
  • Silvestro (891–898) [1]
  • Crisogno (after 904) [3]
  • Costantino (958) [4]
  • Benedictus (963–964 and again in 967–969), [5] who consecrated the antipope Leo VIII
  • Gregorio (985-994), [6] who built the irrigation system of the territory of the diocese
  • Benedetto (998–1001) [7] [1]
  • Tefilato (1001–1012) [1]
  • Benedetto da Potio (1012–ca. 1030) [1]
  • Giovanni Ponzio (1025–1033) [1]
  • Giovanni (1032–1046) [1]
  • Giorgio (1046–ca. 1049) [1]
  • Giovanni (1049–1062) [1]
  • Rolando (ca. 1050/62)
  • Giovanni (1057–1089), joined the obedience of antipope Clement III in 1084
  • Giovanni (1087–1095)
  • Mauritius (1095×99–1102), sent by Pope Paschal II to establish order in religious affairs in the Holy Land
  • John (1102×3–????)
  • Callistus II (1119–1124), who united to the See of Porto the other suburbicarian See of Silva Candida or Santa Rufina.

Cardinal bishops of Porto & Rufina

1500-1599

1600-1699

1700-1799

1800-1967

Cardinal-bishops since 1967

Diocesan bishops since 1967

In 1826, Civitavecchia was separated from the Diocese of Viterbo and Toscanella and united with that of Porto, but in 1854, with Corneto, it was made an independent see. Mention should be made of the Cardinal Bishop of Porto Luigi Lambruschini (1847), who restored the cathedral and the episcopal palace.[ citation needed ]

From the 16th century, the incumbency of prelates of this see was, as a rule, of short duration, because most of the cardinal-bishops preferred the See of Ostia and Velletri, which they exchanged for their own as soon as possible.[ citation needed ]

The Diocese of Cære, now Cerveteri, has been united with that of Porto since the 12th century. Cære was an ancient city, called at first Agylla, where the sanctuaries of Rome and the Vestals were hidden during the invasion of the Gauls; the Etruscan tombs scattered about its territory are important archeologically. Cervetri had bishops of its own until the 11th century; the first was Adeodatus (499), assuming that he was not the Adeodatus who signed himself Bishop of Silva-Candida in the third synod of Pope Symmachus (501). The last known was Benedictus, referred to in 1015 and 1029. The Diocese of Porto and Santa Rufina has 18 parishes, with 4600 inhabitants.[ citation needed ]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Creations of Cardinals of the 9th Century
  2. The Ecole Glossary
  3. The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Creations of Cardinals of the 10th Century
  4. The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Creations of Cardinals of the 10th Century
  5. The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Creations of Cardinals of the 10th Century
  6. The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Creations of Cardinals of the 10th Century
  7. Source for the period 1029-1130: Hüls, Kardinäle, Klerus und Kirchen Roms: 1049-1130, p. 117-124.
  8. During the incumbency of Francesco Condulmer, Pope Nicholas V separated the sees of Porto and Santa Rufina in 1452, and gave the latter to John Kemp, Archbishop of Canterbury, at whose death (1453) the sees were reunited.
  9. http://www.fiu.edu/~mirandas/bios1439.htm#Kempe
  10. "Suburbicarian See of Porto-Santa Rufina". Catholic-Hierarchy.org . David M. Cheney. Retrieved 21 January 2015.

Coordinates: 42°32′08″N12°22′42″E / 42.5356°N 12.3783°E / 42.5356; 12.3783