Romanization of Korean (North)

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Romanization of Korean is the official Korean language romanization system in North Korea proclaimed by the Sahoe Kwahagwŏn to replace the older McCune–Reischauer system since 1992, [1] [2] last updated in 2002. [2]

Romanization of Korean

Romanization of Korean refers to systems for representing the Korean language in the Latin script. Korea's alphabetic script, called Hangul, has historically been used in conjunction with Hanja, though such practice has become infrequent.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

McCune–Reischauer Korean language romanization system

McCune–Reischauer romanization is one of the two most widely used Korean language romanization systems. A modified version of McCune–Reischauer was the official romanization system in South Korea until 2000, when it was replaced by the Revised Romanization of Korean system. A variant of McCune–Reischauer is still used as the official system in North Korea.

Contents

Transcription rules

Vowels

Chosŏn'gŭl
Romanizationaaeyayaeŏe*yeowawaeoeyouwewiyuŭŭii

Consonants

Chosŏn'gŭl
RomanizationInitialkkkntttrmpppsss-jjjchkhthphh
Finalknt-lmp-tngt-tktp
  • 닭섬 → Taksŏm
  • 물곬 → Mulkol
  • 붉은바위 → Pulgŭnbawi
  • 앉은바위 → Anjŭnbawi

Examples

Guide

A personal name is written by family name first, followed by a space and then the given name with the first letter capitalized. And each letter of the name of Chinese character origin is written separately.

A name for administrative units are hyphenated from the placename proper:

However, a name for geographic features and artificial structures are not hyphenated:

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References

  1. "Working Paper No. 46" (PDF). UNGEGN . Retrieved 2018-03-17.
  2. 1 2 "Updates to the report on the current status of United Nations romanization systems for geographical names" (PDF). UNGEGN . Retrieved 2018-03-17. In the Democratic People's Republic of Korea there is a national system adopted in 1992 and presented to the 17th session of UNGEGN in 1994, updated version was published in 200220.