Ron Rylance

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Ron Rylance
Ronald Rylance - Wakefield Trinity.jpeg
Personal information
Full nameRonald Rylance
Born11 March 1924
Wakefield, England
Died11 January 1998(1998-01-11) (aged 73)
Wakefield, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight11 st 7 lb (73 kg)
Position Fullback, Wing, Centre, Stand-off
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1941–50 Wakefield Trinity 218872040669
194?–4?Castleford (guest)
1950–51 Dewsbury 5314940230
1951–55 Huddersfield 9727910263
Total36812838901162
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1945–54 Yorkshire 6
1947 England 10102
Source: [1] [2] [3]

Ronald "Ron" Rylance (11 March 1924 [4] – 11 January 1998) was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 486) (captain), Castleford (Heritage № 253), Dewsbury and Huddersfield, as a fullback , wing , centre or stand-off, i.e. number 1, 2 or 5, 3 or 4, or 6. [1]

Contents

Background

Rylance was born in Wakefield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, and he died aged 73 in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England, and he is buried Sugar Lane Cemetery, Wakefield, that is adjacent to Belle Vue stadium.

Playing career

Rylance made his début for Wakefield Trinity in the 27–2 victory over Broughton Rangers at Belle Vue on Saturday 6 September 1941. In 1950, he was transferred from Wakefield Trinity to Dewsbury. In August 1951, he moved to Huddersfield. [5] he appears to have scored no drop-goals (or field-goals as they are currently known in Australasia), but prior to the 1974–75 season all goals, whether; conversions, penalties, or drop-goals, scored 2-points, consequently prior to this date drop-goals were often not explicitly documented, therefore '0' drop-goals may indicate drop-goals not recorded, rather than no drop-goals scored. In addition, prior to the 1949–50 season, the archaic field-goal was also still a valid means of scoring points.

International honours

Rylance won a cap for England while at Wakefield Trinity in 1947 against Wales. [2]

He was in the Great Britain squad while at Huddersfield for the 1954 Rugby League World Cup in France, but did not participate in any of the four matches.

County honours

Rylance was selected for Yorkshire County XIII while at Wakefield Trinity during the 1945/46 and 1946/47 seasons. [6]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Rylance played right wing, i.e. number 2, in Wakefield Trinity's 13–12 victory over Wigan in the 1945–46 Challenge Cup Final during the 1945–46 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 4 May 1946, in front of a crowd of 54,730. [7]

County Cup Final appearances

Rylance played stand-off in Wakefield Trinity's 2–5 defeat by Bradford Northern in the 1945–46 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1945–46 season at Thrum Hall, Halifax on Saturday 3 November 1945, played right-centre, i.e. number 3, and scored a try in the 10–0 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1946–47 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1946–47 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 31 November 1946, he did not play in the 7–7 draw with Leeds in the 1947–48 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1947–48 season at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 1 November 1947, and played left wing, i.e. number 5, and was captain in the 8–7 victory over Leeds in the 1947–48 Yorkshire County Cup Final replay during the 1947–48 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Wednesday 5 November 1947. [7]

Contemporaneous Article Extract

"Played RU with Wakefield Q.E. Grammar School, but had experience of RL in workshop competitions before joining Wakefield Trinity in 1943. Primarily an off-half, he also occupied the centre , fullback, and wing berths with skill and credit to give valuable service to the Club. In '45/6 he scored 113 points in 11 weeks – a remarkable scoring run. Gained Yorkshire and England recognition. Dewsbury paid record fee for his transfer in 1950, after which he later joined Huddersfield before returning to Belle Vue as a committee member." [8]

Genealogical information

Ron Rylance's marriage to Betty (née Reyner) was registered during fourth ¼ 1948 in Wakefield district. [9] They had children; Ronald Mike Rylance (birth registered fourth ¼ 1949 (age 7172) in Wakefield district), [10] a teacher of modern languages at Queen Elizabeth Grammar School, Wakefield, sports journalist and editor (Rugby Leaguer & League Express and Rugby League World), and author, Yvonne Elizabeth Rylance (Fairclough), retired Deputy Head of Silcoates School, Wakefield, and chairman of Walton Parish Council (born 26 August 1952 (age 68) in Dewsbury district), Fiona S. Rylance (Smith) (born 25 March 1959 (age 62) in Wakefield district), and Louise Rylance (Higginbottom) (born 22 December 1964 (age 56) in Northampton).

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. Gronow, David (2008). 100 Greats: Huddersfield Rugby League Football Club. Stroud: Stadia. p. 97. ISBN   978-0-7524-4584-7.
  4. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. 1952 Fartown Rugby League Yearbook (PDF). H.C. & A.C. Supporters Club. p. 28.
  6. Lindley, John (1960). Dreadnoughts – A HISTORY OF Wakefield Trinity F. C. 1873 – 1960 [Page118]. John Lindley Son & Co Ltd. ISBN n/a
  7. 1 2 Hoole, Les (2004). Wakefield Trinity RLFC – FIFTY GREAT GAMES. Breedon Books. ISBN   1-85983-429-9
  8. Lindley, John (1960). Dreadnoughts – A HISTORY OF Wakefield Trinity F. C. 1873 – 1960. John Lindley Son & Co Ltd. ISBN n/a
  9. "Marriage details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  10. Mike Rylance (22 August 2013). "Trinity: A History of the Wakefield Rugby League Football Club 1872–2013". League Publications Ltd. ISBN   978-1901347289