Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition

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The Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE) was an expedition from 19471948 which researched the area surrounding the head of the Weddell Sea in Antarctica.

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Background

Finn Ronne led the RARE which was the final privately sponsored expedition from the United States and explored and mapped the last unknown coastline on earth and determined that the Weddell Sea and the Ross Sea were not connected. The expedition included Isaac Schlossbach, as second in command, who was to have Cape Schlossbach named after him. The expedition, based out of Stonington Island was the first to take women to over-winter. Ronne's wife, Edith Ronne was correspondent for the North American Newspaper Alliance for expedition and the chief pilot Darlington took his wife.

Partial Listing of Discoveries

See also

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Mount Horne is, at 1,165 metres (3,820 ft), the highest and most prominent mountain in the Quilty Nunataks, standing 12 nautical miles (22 km) east-northeast of Mount Hassage in Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was discovered by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48, under Finn Ronne, who named it for Bernard Horne of Pittsburgh, who furnished wind-proofs and other clothing for the expedition.

Rare Range is a rugged mountain range between the Wetmore and Irvine Glaciers, in Palmer Land. Discovered and photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in recognition of the contributions made by this expedition to knowledge of Palmer Land and the Antarctic Peninsula area.

References

  1. "GNIS Detail - Mount Brundage". geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 3 April 2018.