Roy Walker (production designer)

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Roy Walker
Born1931
Tonbridge, Kent, England
Died6 January 2013(2013-01-06) (aged 81–82)
OccupationProduction designer
Years active1953-2001
Awards Academy Award, British Academy Film Award

Roy Walker (1931 6 January 2013) [1] was a British production designer. He won an Academy Award and was nominated for two more in the category Best Art Direction. [2] Born in England Kent, England in 1931, Walker began his career at 16. [3]

Contents

Selected filmography

Walker won an Academy Award for Best Art Direction and was nominated for two more:

Won
Nominated

He also won a BAFTA Film Award for Best Production Design/Art Direction for The Killing Fields (1984).

Other notable projects include:

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References

  1. "Results Page" . Retrieved 21 June 2015.[ permanent dead link ]
  2. "IMDb.com: Roy Walker - Awards". IMDb.com. Retrieved 27 December 2008.
  3. 1 2 "A cluster of period pieces this season highlights the key yet often overlooked role of production designers. Here (and on Page 32) is their chance to describe . . . : How They Got the Look". Los Angeles Times. 7 November 1999. Retrieved 20 April 2021.
  4. "Roy Walker". www.tcm.com. Retrieved 20 April 2021.