Rump state

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Kingdom of Soissons, a Roman rump state. Detailed Domain of Soissons.svg
Kingdom of Soissons, a Roman rump state.

A rump state is the remnant of a once much larger state, left with a reduced territory in the wake of secession, annexation, occupation, decolonization, or a successful coup d'état or revolution on part of its former territory. [1] In the latter case, a government stops short of going into exile because it still controls part of its former territory.

Contents

Examples

Ancient history

Post-classical history

Modern history

Disputed cases

See also

Related Research Articles

History of China Account of past events in the Chinese civilisation

The earliest known written records of the history of China date from as early as 1250 BC, from the Shang dynasty, during the king Wu Ding's reign, who was mentioned as the twenty-first Shang king by the same. Ancient historical texts such as the Book of Documents, the Records of the Grand Historian and the Bamboo Annals mention and describe a Xia dynasty before the Shang, but no writing is known from the period, and Shang writings do not indicate the existence of the Xia. The Shang ruled in the Yellow River valley, which is commonly held to be the cradle of Chinese civilization. However, Neolithic civilizations originated at various cultural centers along both the Yellow River and Yangtze River. These Yellow River and Yangtze civilizations arose millennia before the Shang. With thousands of years of continuous history, China is one of the world's oldest civilizations, and is regarded as one of the cradles of civilization.

Colony Territory under the political control of an overseas state, generally with its own subordinate colonial government

A colony is a territory under the immediate complete political control and occupied by settlers of a state, distinct from the home territory of the sovereign. For colonies in antiquity, city-states would often found their own colonies. Some colonies were historically countries, while others were territories without definite statehood from their inception.

Irredentism Political movement for claiming territory considered lost

Irredentism describes various political and popular movements that claim, reclaim, and seek to occupy territory that the movement's members consider to be a "lost" territory, based on history or even legend.

China proper Geopolitical term

China proper, Inner China or the Eighteen Provinces was a term used by Western writers on the Manchu Qing dynasty to express a distinction between the core and frontier regions of China. There is no fixed extent for China proper, as many administrative, cultural, and linguistic shifts have occurred in Chinese history. One definition refers to the original area of Chinese civilization, the Central Plain ; another to the "Eighteen Provinces" system of the Qing dynasty. There is no direct translation for "China proper" in the Chinese language due to differences in terminology used by the Qing to refer to the regions and the expression is controversial among scholars, particularly in China, due to national territorial claims.

Chinese unification potential political unification of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) and the Republic of China (ROC)/Taiwan into a single sovereign state

Chinese unification, also known as the Cross-Strait unification or reunification, is the potential unification of territory currently controlled by the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China under one political entity, possibly the formation of a political union between the two republics. Together with full Taiwanese independence, unification is one of the main proposals to address questions on the political status of Taiwan, which is a central focus of Cross-Strait relations.

One-China policy Policy of only recognizing one state of China

The "One-China policy" is a policy asserting that there is only one sovereign state under the name China, as opposed to the idea that there are two states, the People's Republic of China (PRC) and the Republic of China (ROC), whose official names incorporate "China". Many states follow a one China policy, but the meanings are not the same. The PRC exclusively uses the term "One China Principle" in its official communications.

Secession is the withdrawal of a group from a larger entity, especially a political entity, but also from any organization, union or military alliance. Some of the most famous and significant secessions have been: the former Soviet republics leaving the Soviet Union, and Algeria leaving France. Threats of secession can be a strategy for achieving more limited goals. It is, therefore, a process, which commences once a group proclaims the act of secession. A secession attempt might be violent or peaceful, but the goal is the creation of a new state or entity independent from the group or territory it seceded from.

Koxinga Chinese military leader

Zheng Chenggong, Prince of Yanping, better known internationally by his Dutch-Romanised Hokkien honorific Koxinga or Coxinga, was a Chinese Ming loyalist who resisted the Qing conquest of China in the 17th century, fighting them on China's southeastern coast.

Names of China

The names of China include the many contemporary and historical appellations given in various languages for the East Asian country known as Zhōngguó in its official language. China, the name in English for the country, was derived from Portuguese in the 16th century, and became popular in the mid 19th century. It is believed to be a borrowing from Middle Persian, and some have traced it further back to Sanskrit. It is also thought that the ultimate source of the name China is the Chinese word "Qin", the name of the dynasty that unified China but also existed as a state for many centuries prior. There are, however, other alternative suggestions for the origin of the word.

The Eight Banners were administrative and military divisions under the Later Jin and the Qing dynasty of China into which all Manchu households were placed. In war, the Eight Banners functioned as armies, but the banner system was also the basic organizational framework of all of Manchu society. Created in the early 17th century by Nurhaci, the banner armies played an instrumental role in his unification of the fragmented Jurchen people and in the Qing dynasty's conquest of the Ming dynasty.

A government in exile is a political group which claims to be a country or semi-sovereign state's legitimate government, but is unable to exercise legal power and instead resides in another state or foreign country. Governments in exile usually plan to one day return to their native country and regain formal power. A government in exile differs from a rump state in the sense that a rump state controls at least part of its former territory. For example, during World War I, nearly all of Belgium was occupied by Germany, but Belgium and its allies held on to a small slice in the country's west. A government in exile, in contrast, has lost all its territory.

Kingdom of Tungning former country

The Kingdom of Tungning or Kingdom of Formosa was a government that ruled part of southwestern Formosa (Taiwan) between 1661 and 1683. It was founded by Koxinga as part of the loyalist movement to restore the Ming dynasty in China after it was overthrown by the Manchu-led Qing dynasty. Koxinga hoped to recapture the Chinese mainland from the Qing, using the island as a base of operations. Until its annexation by the Qing Dynasty in 1683, the Kingdom was ruled by Koxinga's heirs, the House of Koxinga.

Chinese imperialism aspect of history

Over the last four thousand years, Chinese imperialism have been a central feature of the history of East Asia. Since the recovery of Chinese strength in the late 20th century, the issues involved have been of concern to China's neighbors to the east.

A rump legislature is a legislature formed of part, usually a minority, of the legislators originally elected or appointed to office.

An exclusive mandate is a government's assertion of its legitimate authority over a certain territory, part of which another government controls with stable, de facto sovereignty. It is also known as a claim to sole representation or an exclusive authority claim. The concept was particularly important during the Cold War period when a number of states were divided on ideological grounds.

Two Chinas Refers to the situation where two political entities each name themselves "China"

The term Two Chinas refers to the current geopolitical situation of two political entities each calling itself "China":

Partition (politics) division of a territory

In politics, a partition is a change of political borders cutting through at least one territory considered a homeland by some community.

Republic of China (1912–1949) 1912–1949 country in Asia, when the Republic of China governed mainland China, prior to relocation to Taiwan

The Republic of China (ROC) was a sovereign state based in mainland China between 1912 and 1949, prior to the relocation of its government to the island of Taiwan. It was established on 1 January 1912 after the Xinhai Revolution, which overthrew the Qing dynasty, the last imperial dynasty of China. The Republic's first president, Sun Yat-sen, served only briefly before handing over the position to Yuan Shikai, the leader of the Beiyang Army. Sun's party, the Kuomintang (KMT), then led by Song Jiaoren, won the parliamentary election held in December 1912. However, Song was assassinated on Yuan's orders shortly after; and the Beiyang Army, led by Yuan, maintained full control of the Beiyang government. Between late 1915 and early 1916, Yuan proclaimed himself Emperor of China before abdicating not long after due to popular unrest. After Yuan's death in 1916, the authority of the Beiyang government was further weakened by a brief restoration of the Qing dynasty. Cliques in the Beiyang Army claimed individual autonomy and clashed with each other during the ensuing Warlord Era.

The history of Sino-Korean relations dates back to prehistoric times.

Secession in China

Secession in China refers to several secessionist movements in the People's Republic of China.

References

Citations

  1. Tir, Jaroslav (Feb 22, 2005). Keeping the Peace After Secessions: Territorial Conflicts Between Rump and Secessionist States. Annual meeting of the International Studies Association. Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu: Hawaii Online. Retrieved Oct 26, 2014.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
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  3. Fattah, Hala Mundhir; Caso, Frank (2009). A Brief History of Iraq. p. 277.
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  5. Struve, Lynn A. (1998). "The Ming-Qing Conflict, 1619-1683: A Historiography and Source Guide": 110–111.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
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  7. Struve, Lynn A. (1998). "The Ming-Qing Conflict, 1619-1683: A Historiography and Source Guide": 110–111.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  8. Fazal, Tanisha M. (2011). State Death: The Politics and Geography of Conquest, Occupation, and Annexation. Princeton University Press. p. 110. ISBN   9781400841448.
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  13. James Hartfield, Unpatriotic History of the Second World War, ISBN   178099379X, 2012, p. 424
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  16. Tir, Jaroslav (2005). "Keeping the Peace after Secession: Territorial Conflicts between Rump and Secessionist States". The Journal of Conflict Resolution. 49 (5): 714. doi:10.1177/0022002705279426.
  17. Tir, Jaroslav (2005). "Keeping the Peace after Secession: Territorial Conflicts between Rump and Secessionist States". The Journal of Conflict Resolution. 49 (5): 714. doi:10.1177/0022002705279426.
  18. 1 2 Sudetic, Chuck (1991-10-24), "Top Serb Leaders Back Proposal To Form Separate Yugoslav State", New York Times, retrieved 2018-03-07.
  19. Krasner, Stephen D. (2001). Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities. Columbia University Press. p. 148. For some time the Truman administration had been hoping to distance itself from the rump state on Taiwan and to establish at least a minimal relationship with the newly founded PRC.
  20. "TIMELINE: Milestones in China-Taiwan relations since 1949". Reuters . Retrieved March 4, 2015. 1949: Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists lose civil war to Mao Zedong's Communist forces, sets up government-in-exile on Taiwan.

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