Russ Cohen

Last updated
Russ Cohen
Russ Cohen - UC.jpg
Cohen pictured in The Cincinnatian 1937, Cincinnati yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1893-02-13)February 13, 1893
Augusta, Georgia
DiedApril 7, 1981(1981-04-07) (aged 88)
Waynesboro, Georgia
Playing career
1913–1916 Vanderbilt
Position(s) End
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1923–1926 Alabama (assistant)
1928–1931 LSU
1932 Vanderbilt (assistant)
1935–1937 Cincinnati
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1928–1931 LSU
Head coaching record
Overall31–25–4
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-Southern (1915)

Henry Russell Cohen (February 13, 1893 – April 7, 1981) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Louisiana State University (LSU) from 1928 to 1931 and at the University of Cincinnati from 1935 to 1937, compiling a career college football coaching record of 31–25–4.

Contents

Playing career

Cohen played as a prominent end for Dan McGugin's Vanderbilt Commodores football teams, serving as captain of its "point-a-minute" Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) champion 1915 team, with the likes of Josh Cody and Irby Curry. Cohen was selected All-Southern the same year. [1]

Coaching career

Cohen scouted teams for Wallace Wade at the University of Alabama. [2]

LSU

As was tradition for football coaches at the time, he also served as the athletics director at LSU during his tenure as head football coach. [3] His record with the LSU Tigers was 23–13–1. [4] McGugin recommended Cohen for the LSU job. [5] Huey P. Long was an ardent supporter of the team. [6]

Cohen's best year at LSU was probably his first, in 1928. Led by All-Southern captain Jess Tinsley, the Tigers posted a 6–2–1 record, suffering losses to Arkansas and Wade's Alabama. Star halfback Percy Brown broke his shoulder against Alabama. [7] The tie was to Bill Banker and rival Tulane, which was as good as its ever been from 1929 to 1931. In 1931 LSU played its first night game in Tiger Stadium, a 31–0 victory over Spring Hill.

Cincinnati

With the Cincinnati Bearcats, he compiled an 8–12–3 mark. [8]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
LSU Tigers (Southern Conference)(1928–1931)
1928 LSU 6–2–13–1–16th
1929 LSU 6–33–210th
1930 LSU 6–42–416th
1931 LSU 5–43–27th
LSU:23–13–111–9–1
Cincinnati Bearcats (Buckeye Athletic Association)(1935–1937)
1935 Cincinnati 7–23–2T–2nd
1936 Cincinnati 1–5–31–2–25th
1937 Cincinnati 0–5*0–1
Cincinnati:8–12–34–5–2*Last 5 games of season were coached by Wade Woodworth.
Total:31–25–4

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References

  1. Dick Jemison (November 30, 1915). "Composite All-Southern Of Ten Of The Dopesters". Atlanta Constitution.
  2. "Who's Who Among Grid Leaders". The Waco News-Tribune. October 11, 1928. p. 8. Retrieved May 23, 2016 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  3. "LSU Year-by-Year Records" (PDF). lsusports.net. p. 107. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  4. "LSU Football media guide". lsusports.net. Retrieved October 25, 2013.
  5. Edwin Pope (1955). Football's Greatest Coaches. p. 341. Retrieved March 8, 2015 via archive.org. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  6. "Huey P. Long Startling As A Football Fan". Cumberland Evening Times. December 4, 1930. p. 12. Retrieved June 2, 2016 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  7. "1928 Season" (PDF). grfx.cstv.com. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  8. "Russell T. "Russ" Cohen Records by Year". cfbdatawarehouse.com/. Retrieved October 25, 2013.